Tackling reconciliation Group tries to understand Indigenous perspectives

October 17, 2019

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first_imgVANCOUVER – As Canada grapples with how to achieve reconciliation with Indigenous people, a group in British Columbia has come together to figure out how to restore relations person-to-person.About a dozen people meet once every three weeks at Kristi Lind’s house in the small community of Naramata south of Kelowna to discuss how to build relationships, fight racism and support local Indigenous communities.“We are learning how to be good allies and to stand side by side,” Lind said.Lind has an interest in social justice and read the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report after hearing a call on the radio for all Canadians to do so. Not wanting to read it alone, she reached out through the local library for others to join her.The Naramata Truth and Reconciliation Group formed and has progressed from reading the report to discussing a range of issues including privilege, trauma and what it means to be an ally.A major benefit to the group has been the involvement of an Indigenous voice, Lind said.Anni Phillips, who grew up in Saskatchewan, is of Cree and Scottish descent.One of the group’s first activities was to unpack their personal ancestry, and Phillips said it became clear that her upbringing was very different from the experiences of the predominately white and middle-class group.Phillips said her mother, who is Indigenous, left her family when she was under the age of five. She then lived with her father’s non-Indigenous family for several years before moving in with her father and his partner’s family, who are Cree, she said.“I lived in both worlds,” said Phillips, who testified about her experience at hearings held by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.While it was “stressful” to share her past with the group in Naramata, it was also a learning experience, she said.“Growing up, I hid my identity in order to basically survive in this world because it was so bad to be an Indian.”Phillips credits the Truth and Reconciliation Commission for changing her awareness.“I started to understand more of my upbringing, and hiding my identity, why I did that, why I felt so much shame about who I was,” she added.Phillips said for her, reconciliation has come to mean self-healing, rebuilding relationships with family and educating the broader community about the truth of what has happened to Indigenous people.Lind said for the group, reconciliation is about listening and forming relationships with local First Nation communities.Members of the group attend events or rallies hosted by First Nations and participated in an anti-racism march in the village, she said. They have also inspired two other groups to form in the Okanagan.Ry Moran, director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation at the University of Manitoba, said Canadians can feel overwhelmed about where to begin with reconciliation but there are many simple ways to engage in Indigenous issues, from reading books to watching films.“The question isn’t so much what to do but how to fit it into one’s life and we have to make the choices in our daily lives to want to become involved and want to learn more,” he said.Throughout history, Moran said Canadians haven’t sought the perspectives and ideas of Indigenous people, but that is slowly changing.Reconciliation groups like the one in Naramata have formed across the country. There is also growing interest in Indigenous tourism and culture, and an increase in the number of Indigenous people in positions of power, he said.While change can feel destabilizing and discussions around race and equality are difficult, Moran said it’s important they take place.“It’s so powerful when we begin to listen to voices we have not been hearing in society, the voices of the people who are bearing the brunt of the unequal or unethical or unjust ways that our society is functioning.”— Follow @Givetash on Twitter.last_img read more


Toronto launches public consultation to address exotic animal and mobile zoo problem

October 17, 2019

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first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s most populous city has an exotic animal problem.Staff with the City of Toronto admit that a bylaw on prohibited animals contains loopholes allowing so-called mobile zoos — which take animals around for events ranging from birthday parties to church picnics — to flourish with little oversight, raising concerns about animal welfare and human health.To deal with the issue, the city has launched a wide-ranging consultation on prohibited animals that involves an online survey for the public, as well as meetings with exotic animal businesses and animal welfare groups to address the “significant rise” in mobile zoos.Toronto already has an extensive list of banned animals, such as monkeys, tigers and alligators, and owning one could result in a $240 fine. But the city admits there are weaknesses in the rules, particularly when it comes to mobile zoos.“We don’t know who’s bringing animals into the city, what kind of animals they’re bringing into the city and where they’re using these animals and how they’re using these animals,” said Elizabeth Glibbery, manager of the city’s animal services department. “We have no idea at this time.”An investigation by The Canadian Press last fall found that mobile zoos working with exotics — wild animals taken from their natural habitat or bred in captivity and not native to the country — appear to be on the rise in Canada, with industry watchers blaming a patchwork of outdated and inconsistent laws and bylaws for the trend.Some experts have said exposure to disease through mobile animal businesses is a concern since many exotics harbour contagions that do them no harm but can put humans at serious risk. Animals who are not adapted to endure significant human contact may also lash out in unexpected ways.Data on mobile zoos is hard to come by. The Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, for instance, had indicated late last year it only had five such mobile zoos registered in the province, but a list compiled from industry watchdog Zoocheck shows nearly 70 have popped up in the Greater Toronto Area over the past few years.In Toronto, a prohibited animal bylaw granted mobile zoos an exemption to the rule if they were accredited by Canada’s Accredited Zoos and Aquariums, the self-regulating industry group for which members pay dues, and were located in an industrial zone.Last December, an amendment to the bylaw got rid of that exemption, but grandfathered in companies already operating in the city.At the same time, city council also tried to get rid of another part of the bylaw that allowed exotic animals to be taken anywhere in the city as part of an educational program.It was at that point that about two dozen operations contacted the city to complain they weren’t consulted, Glibbery said.“We didn’t realize how many businesses this would affect,” Glibbery said, adding 26 business that deal with exotic animals were scheduled to sit down with the city in the coming weeks.Now it seems everything is on the table, Glibbery said, from ridding the city of mobile zoos entirely to changing Toronto’s list of prohibited animals, including the possibility of moving to a “positive” list — a list of animals people can own, as opposed to those they can’t.It has taken years for the loopholes in Toronto’s prohibited animal bylaw to be addressed, with city staff citing the backlog of work at the licensing and standards department for the slow progress. The exceptions to the rules may well have remained in the dark were it not for a now-infamous flamingo.In 2013, Coun. Paula Fletcher said she heard complaints about a kangaroo being walked on a leash in her ward.Incredulous, she started researching and discovered Hands On Exotics, a Toronto-based company that describes itself as an animal shelter specializing in exotics. It runs what it calls education programs for schools, community centres and private events, like birthday parties, where animals are taken to meet the public.Fletcher found that Hands On Exotics was operating in her ward and owned the kangaroo she had seen, along with many other animals on the prohibited list. She decided to visit the organization to learn more.“I looked in their window and saw a flamingo in this large room standing on one foot in an aluminum pie tin in small amount of water,” Fletcher said in an interview. “I felt terribly sorry for that flamingo and it spurred me on. We have to get a proper bylaw to protect these exotic animals from being exploited in this city.”Hands On Exotics said the flamingo had access to plenty of water and emphatically denied what Fletcher said she saw.Seth Falk, the owner of the company, said his business treats animals well and is inspected regularly by the OSPCA.“For us, most of our shows are with special needs people and seniors and those who can’t go to the zoo,” he said. “Education with animals isn’t going to be done in the same manner in every facility.”But Coun. Glenn De Baeremaeker, who is leading a push to rid the city of mobile zoos, scoffed at that explanation.“Nobody is really educated, they’re just entertained with some novelty items and it’s totally unnecessary,” he said, highlighting the case of the infamous flamingo.“If a family tells me they want to buy a flamingo, or have a flamingo come for a visit, well I’m sorry, you cannot buy a flamingo or hang out with a flamingo in your home, you must be crazy.”Flamingos, incidentally, are not currently on Toronto’s prohibited animals list.After its public consultations, the city’s licensing and standards bureau will draft a report on prohibited animals in the city that will make its way through committee and council meetings.last_img read more


Feds have set aside money for interim Super Hornets but arent saying

October 17, 2019

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first_imgOTTAWA – National Defence has an idea of what it will cost to buy and operate 18 Super Hornets on an interim basis and has even set aside money to make the purchase — it just isn’t saying how much.Questions about the cost of the fighter jets have figured prominently since the Trudeau government announced its intention to buy the planes as a stop-gap last November.In an interview with The Canadian Press, National Defence’s chief financial officer, Claude Rochette, said his staff members were ordered to come up with a cost estimate for the Super Hornets at that time.The exercise ran in parallel with the much larger effort to cost out the Liberals’ new defence policy and included help from a team of experts from accounting firm Deloitte.“The government asked us to look at options, but in particular Super Hornets. So 18 Super Hornets,” Rochette said.“That (Deloitte) team came from the U.S. and they (had) worked directly with Boeing. So they had access to information, and they had done costing before.”Officials assessed the expected cost to not only purchase and fly the planes, he said, “we have also taken into account the disposal, what would be the residual value of the jets. So we have all that.”Yet there was hardly any mention of the interim fighter jets when the defence policy was unveiled in June with a promise to invest an extra $62 billion in the Canadian military over the next 20 years.Most of what was written about fighter jets instead focused on an eventual competition to replace Canada’s existing CF-18s with 88 new planes, at a cost of between $16 billion and $20 billion.The policy also revealed the cost of many other planned military procurement projects, including estimates that replacing the navy’s 12 frigates and three destroyers will cost up to $60 billion.What little was written about interim fighter jets did not include a dollar figure.Rochette insisted the policy does include money for interim fighters, but that he couldn’t reveal how much because the government still hasn’t decided to move ahead with the purchase.National Defence spokesman Dan Le Bouthillier said the department is also waiting for more reliable data from the U.S. That information was expected this week, but it has since been delayed.“In order to provide accurate and reliable costing information, Canada requires additional information from the U.S. government,” Le Bouthillier said in an email.“Only then will we be able to determine whether we can obtain an interim fighter with the capability we need, in the time frame we need it, and at an affordable cost. It’s part of the analysis we do to allow government to make a final decision.”Some public estimates have pegged the figure at around $2 billion just to buy the planes, and several more billion to maintain and operate them, but Rochette would not confirm those numbers.The decision whether to buy the Super Hornets is expected to ultimately hinge on the results of a trade dispute between their U.S. manufacturer, Boeing Co., and Canadian rival Bombardier.The U.S. Commerce Department on Sept. 25 will present the results of its investigation into whether Bombardier sold its CSeries passenger jets at an unfairly low price with help from federal subsidies.An adverse finding could result in fines or tariffs on Bombardier, but could also prompt the Liberals, which have criticized the investigation, to walk away from interim Super Hornets.The Trudeau government announced in November its plan to purchase the planes to temporarily fill a critical shortage of fighter jets until a full competition can be run to replace the aging CF-18s.The government said at the time that the Super Hornet was the only aircraft able to meet its immediate requirements, including being a mature design compatible with U.S. fighters.Many defence experts, including 13 retired air force commanders, have criticized the plan to purchase interim Super Hornets and called for an immediate competition to replace the CF-18s.— Follow @leeberthiaume on Twitterlast_img read more


No salmon return to Canada river bringing New England fears

October 17, 2019

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first_imgA conservation group’s discovery that no wild Atlantic salmon have returned to a key river in New Brunswick is prompting concern for the fish’s population health in the U.S. and eastern Canada.The New Brunswick-based Atlantic Salmon Federation has been monitoring the Magaguadavic River for the Canadian government since 1992. The group says this year is the first time since then that no wild salmon have returned to the river to spawn.Atlantic salmon were once abundant in rivers of New England and eastern Canada, but they’re now endangered or have disappeared in parts of both areas. The U.S.’s National Marine Fisheries Service is in the midst of reviewing the Gulf of Maine’s population, which is listed endangered under the Endangered Species Act.About 900 wild salmon entered the river to spawn in 1983, and the fact that none returned this year is bad news for the fish’s population in Maine and Canada, said Neville Crabbe, spokesman for the Atlantic Salmon Federation.“It means for the Magaguadavic River, whatever wild salmon that existed there are now extinct,” Crabbe said. “It affects the good work being done on all the rivers.”Atlantic salmon populations have suffered due to dams, loss of habitat, pollution, climate change and overfishing. They cannot be legally fished commercially in the U.S., but continue to face fishing pressure from Greenland. The only native populations of Atlantic salmon left in the U.S. are in Maine, though restoration efforts are afoot elsewhere in New England.Maine’s most active salmon river is the Penobscot River, and returns there have ebbed and flowed over the years, said Dan Kircheis, a fisheries biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service. Nearly 850 have returned this year, which is an improvement from 261 in 2014, but far less than more than 1,950 that returned in 2009, according to fisheries service statistics.The disappearance of salmon from the Magagauadavic reflects recent stock assessments that say the river has been “effectively extirpated of wild fish,” said John Kocik, another biologist with the fisheries service.Canada assessed the Outer Bay of Fundy population of Atlantic salmon as endangered in 2010, Fisheries and Oceans Canada spokeswoman Carole Saindon said. The agency recognizes threats to the fish such as poaching, disease and changing marine conditions and “remains committed to restoring the wild Atlantic salmon runs in Eastern Canada,” she said.The Magaguadavic River is located about 45 minutes from the Maine border. It feeds into Passamaquoddy Bay, which is home to salmon farming pens and in turn feeds into the Bay of Fundy.Atlantic Salmon Federation places some of the blame for wild salmon’s struggles off of New Brunswick on salmon farming in the area. Escaped salmon from ocean pens compete with wild fish, and can interbreed with wild fish to yield hybrid offspring that are less fit to survive in the wild, Crabbe said. He described salmon farming as one of the problems affecting fish that humans have the most control over.Cooke Aquaculture, the biggest player in salmon farming in New Brunswick and Maine, is required to report escapes, and there have been very few in recent years, said Nell Halse, a Cooke spokeswoman.“It’s not really accurate to portray it as this terrible problem of escapes,” she said. “It’s a very small number of fish.”last_img read more


Eby speaks about rooting out racism after posters appear at university

October 17, 2019

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first_imgVICTORIA – The appearance of discriminatory posters at the University of Victoria campus are stark reminders of the need to fight racism in its overt and subtle forms, British Columbia’s attorney general told law students Friday.David Eby denounced the posters found on university bulletin boards that called for a fight against “anti-white hatred,” saying they are reminders of the work that must be done to identify and prevent racism.“The posters here at the University of Victoria remind us that there is important work to be done in identifying and rooting out racism and discrimination and also in educating the broader public who may not face this as part of their day-to-day reality,” he said.Eby said racism and discrimination can be overt in the presence of hate-filled posters, flyers and public protests, but there are also subtle forms where people are denied opportunities due to their ethnicity or economic standing.He said as a young lawyer working in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside he offered advice to Indigenous clients who were regularly turned down by landlords despite their solid qualifications. He also encountered clients on welfare who couldn’t get housing because landlords wouldn’t offer them places to rent.“That’s what discrimination looked like to my clients,” Eby said. “It was a much more subtle kind of discrimination.”Eby’s appearance at the law class is part of the New Democrat government’s promise to re-establish the B.C. Human Rights Commission, disbanded 15 years ago by the former Liberal government. A public meeting and submission process is open until Nov. 17 and human rights legislation is expected next year.“It is, in my opinion, critically important to reassure communities targeted by these kinds of posters, flyers and other attacks that government is engaged in this, that we care about it, we want to address it and that this is a place that supports them as a critical piece of our diverse province,” said Eby.The University of Victoria said the posters were removed immediately, but they are examples of the many forms of racism and discrimination that exist on the campus and in society.“Unfortunately, we also know that discriminatory, racist and anti-Semitic attitudes continue to exist; and this reinforces the importance of education and the responsibility of educational institutions like ours to confront ignorance and actively promote respect, inclusiveness and better understanding’” university president Jamie Cassels said in a statement.B’nai Brith Canada spokesman Daniel Koren said in an interview the posters seek to embolden white supremacists.The posters included coded signs and messages to people in underground movements who espouse hatred against Jewish people and others, he said.“When you’re promoting imagery that says to people who understand what it means — Jews will not replace us — and all those connotations, especially given recent neo-Nazi rallies, yes, I would say definitely the work of white supremacists,” Koren said.last_img read more


Answers coming soon in Lionel Desmond killings NS officials say

October 17, 2019

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first_imgHALIFAX – Almost a year after former soldier Lionel Desmond killed his family and then himself in rural Nova Scotia, an official response shedding light on the tragedy is near.The province’s medical examiner, Dr. Matthew Bowes, says he’s “very close” to deciding whether to conduct a fatality inquiry, and Premier Stephen McNeil says the province will give the family some answers, regardless of what Bowes decides.“I’m expecting that something will be happening soon,” McNeil said Wednesday in an interview with The Canadian Press.On Jan. 3, 2017, the retired corporal shot his wife Shanna, 31, their 10-year-daughter Aaliyah and his 52-year-old mother Brenda, before turning the gun on himself. Desmond had been diagnosed with PTSD and post-concussion disorder after completing two difficult tours in Afghanistan in 2007.Advocates say an inquest is long overdue.“The family deserves to have answers and some closure,” says Peter Stoffer, a longtime veterans advocate and former Nova Scotia MP. “Unless there’s an inquiry, there’s always going to be suspicion that the government at either level may be responsible in some way.”Family members say Desmond was a radically changed man when he was medically discharged, and returned home to Upper Big Tracadie, N.S., in 2015. They say his outgoing sense of humour had dimmed and, more importantly, he seemed withdrawn and in a defensive posture much of the time, as if he was still in combat mode.Within hours of the killings, relatives came forward to complain Desmond did not get the help he needed to cope with civilian life, and they demanded a public inquiry to determine what went wrong and how to prevent similar tragedies.Two of Desmond’s sisters, twins Chantel and Cassandra, have led a high-profile campaign calling for an inquiry. Neither woman responded to requests for interviews this week.Bowes has the option of conducting an inquiry under the province’s Fatality Investigations Act.However, such investigations are rare in the province. The last time a fatality inquiry was held in Nova Scotia was almost 10 years ago.Dr. John Butt, the former medical examiner for both Nova Scotia and Alberta, has said Nova Scotia should order an inquiry. And several veterans groups and individuals have also come forward to call for action, including Vets Canada and Wounded Warriors Canada.“Our thoughts are with Lionel Desmond’s family and we support their effort to learn the full details associated with this tragedy,” Scott Maxwell, executive director of Wounded Warriors Canada, said in a statement Wednesday.“It’s important that this situation becomes focused less on political manoeuvering — between the province and the federal government — and more on learning from the review of this case so we, as a nation, can do better by our ill and injured veterans and their families.”The federal and provincial governments have spent the past 11 months largely avoiding the issue, says Trev Bungay, a retired soldier who at one point served in Afghanistan as the master-corporal in charge of Desmond’s unit in the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. Both saw heavy combat amid a rapidly growing list of Canadian casualties.“Everybody wants to push the blame onto somebody else instead of fixing the problem,” says Bungay, co-founder of Trauma Healing Centers, which offer treatment for veterans, first responders and civilians suffering from PTSD, trauma, chronic pain or disabling illness.“Nobody wants the answers because they know the answers are going to put everybody at fault — both governments … How many times does something like this need to happen before they sit down and talk about it?”Bungay spent 18 years in the military, which included four combat tours in Afghanistan. Like Desmond, he struggled with PTSD.“I came home and I went through this exact same thing,” he said in an interview this week.“I spiralled out of control. I lost everything. I was an alcoholic. I was on illicit drugs. You name it, I did it. Eventually, it turned into two suicide attempts … (But) I came out on the other end. I’m one of the lucky ones.”He established the first trauma clinic in 2014. Now there are six centres in Nova Scotia, Ontario and New Brunswick offering help to about 6,000 clients.Bungay says the federal government has improved the way it deals with medically discharged veterans and those with PTSD, but he says it has more work to do.In October, Ottawa promised to improve support for military personnel through a new suicide prevention strategy, which focuses on easing the transition from a military career to civilian life.“Unfortunately, people had to die before any polices changed,” Bungay says. “And that’s exactly where we are right now.”More than 130 serving military personnel have taken their own lives since 2010, according to National Defence.In October, federal Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan suggested his department didn’t have the jurisdiction to conduct an inquiry into the Desmond case because it couldn’t gain access to provincial medical records.McNeil responded by suggesting the responsibility for a probe rested with Ottawa, but this week said the province will respond in some way.“Whatever happens, one or the other (level of government) is going to have to share information,” he said.“Once the medical examiner presents something to the (provincial) justice minister, our goal is then to go out and do something to … bring some level reassurance to the family to show that people are hearing them, and they can find some level of what happened throughout this process.”Like Bungay, Stoffer says both levels of government are apprehensive about allowing an inquiry to dig into what really happened to Lionel Desmond.“They may be afraid they might be ashamed of some policies and practices that were supposed to be in place and weren’t followed properly,” Stoffer says.“It may be a money matter. Who knows the reasons why? … There’s a lot of unanswered questions. And there’s no reason why both levels of government wouldn’t want to co-operate to find out exactly what happened.”— Follow @NovaMac on Twitterlast_img read more


The Thursday news briefing An ataglance survey of some top stories

October 17, 2019

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first_imgHighlights from the news file for Thursday, Dec. 21———MEMORIAL HELD FOR SHERMANS: Thousands of people attended a memorial on Thursday for billionaire philanthropists Barry and Honey Sherman, who were found dead in their Toronto home nearly a week ago. The Shermans’ children say coping with the speculation surrounding their parents’ deaths has compounded the pain of losing their parents. Police have said the Shermans died of “ligature neck compression” and have called the deaths suspicious. The Shermans’ son Jonathon says it has all been a terrible, shocking adjustment.———OPPOSITION WANT TRUDEAU TO REPAY SOME CHRISTMAS VACATION COSTS: The Opposition parties say Prime Minister Justin Trudeau should repay all or part of the transportation and security costs for a Christmas vacation to the Aga Khan’s private Bahamian island last year. The trip cost taxpayers more than $200,000. Ethics commissioner Mary Dawson found the prime minister violated four different provisions of the Conflict of Interest Act. The Tories and New Democrats say Trudeau owes it to taxpayers to repay the bill. The Prime Minister’s Office says Trudeau paid the cost of his and his family’s flights to and from Nassau but would not disclose the precise tab.———MAN FOUND GUILTY OF KILLING NOVA SCOTIA POLICE OFFICER: A Halifax jury has found a man guilty of punching and strangling Nova Scotia police officer Catherine Campbell. The jury rejected Christopher Garnier’s claim that the off-duty officer died accidentally during rough sex. Garnier was convicted of second degree murder, which comes with an automatic life sentence. A hearing to determine Garnier’s parole eligibility is scheduled for May.———HELICOPTER CRASH MAY HAVE BEEN CAUSED BY LOOSE TOOL BAG: The Transportation Safety Board says it appears that an improperly secured tool bag hit the rear rotor of a helicopter that subsequently crashed in eastern Ontario last week. The board says its preliminary investigation into the crash suggested the tool kit carried on a platform outside the helicopter owned by electrical utility Hydro One was the main cause of the deadly incident.———CANADA AVOIDS CRITICIZING TRUMP OVER EMBASSY MOVE: Canada abstained from a vote in the United Nations that criticized U.S. President Donald Trump for his decision to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The UN voted 128-9 in favour of a resolution declaring the U.S. president’s recognition of Jerusalem as the Israeli capital to be null and void. Canada was among the 35 countries that abstained. Canada was left in a difficult position because Trump had threatened to retaliate against countries that supported the resolution.———COUGAR HUNTING IN ALBERTA POPULAR, BIOLOGIST SAYS: A wildlife biologist says cougar hunting is not only legal but quite popular in Alberta during the late fall and early winter. Mark Boyce of the University of Alberta says there are at least 2,500 cougars in the province. He says there is an annual quota of up to 155 cougars that can be killed by residents each winter season in Alberta. Another 30 cats can be hunted by non-residents. The issue surfaced after an Alberta-based host of an outdoor TV show triggered outrage online when he bragged about hunting a big cat earlier this month.———FIRST NATIONS ELDER CRITICAL OF CANADIAN TIRE SEARCH: The family of a First Nations elder says he was humiliated when a Canadian Tire employee in Saskatchewan stopped him and searched him this week. Gordon Albert of the Sweetgrass First Nation was in North Battleford shopping for a gift with his family. Albert’s wife Marlene says an anti-theft device at the door beeped as they left and Albert was searched. The store manager denied race had anything to do what happened but Albert’s son disagrees.———FORMER MONTREAL CONDUCTOR ACCUSED OF SEXUAL ASSAULT: Four performers say renowned conductor Charles Dutoit sexually assaulted them, telling The Associated Press he physically restrained them, forced his body against theirs and caused other non-consensual contact. The Swiss-born maestro has not responded to multiple efforts to contact him. The performers — three opera singers and a classical musician — contend the attacks took place between 1985 and 2010 in five different cities in the U.S. Dutoit, who had a 25-year run with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, did not immediately respond to multiple attempts by the AP to reach him.———last_img read more


Nenshi sides with Notley on AlbertaBC pipeline dispute

October 17, 2019

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first_imgFor the first time, Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi is weighing in on the latest dispute between Alberta, British Columbia and the Trans Mountain expansion project.Premier Rachel Notley has promised economic or legal action against B.C., which announced plans this week to ban increased shipments of bitumen off its coast until it can determine if shippers are prepared to deal with a spill.Nenshi said the B.C. government needs to do a better job of reviewing the federally approved project.“I would strongly encourage the British Columbia government to actually read the N.E.B. ruling that talks, in great detail, about what they claim to be concerned about, about the risk of bitumen spills. I will also remind them that when you fill up your gas in the lower mainland where do you think that gas came from? It came from the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline,” said Nenshi.He’s happy with Notley’s decision.“What the province of British Columbia has done on Trans Mountain is a stunt, it is a dangerous stunt. It is absolute political pandering of the worst kind,” said Nenshi. “I am strongly behind Premier Notley on whatever she does to push this. It is time for us to show our strength and I’m also calling upon the federal government to come together and assert their responsibility and their jurisdiction on this matter.”Nenshi said without the pipeline, oil would be shipped by tanker into Burnaby, B.C., adding that transporting product by pipeline is not only safer, but it also keeps coastal gas prices lower.last_img read more


Trudeau needs to push for meeting with BC premier on pipeline ASAP

October 17, 2019

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first_imgOTTAWA – Conservatives say Prime Minister Justin Trudeau missed a huge opportunity to save the Trans Mountain pipeline last week when he failed to meet with British Columbia Premier John Horgan.Trudeau’s trip to B.C. last Thursday included a stop at the Canadian Coast Guard offices where he discussed the balance needed between environmental protection and natural resource development as pipeline protesters looked on.Although the event was just over one kilometre from the B.C. legislature, no meeting with Horgan was planned — something Conservative MP Chris Warkentin says should have been a priority.Warkentin says Trudeau should immediately demand a meeting with Horgan if he is really serious about actually getting the Trans Mountain pipeline built.Trudeau was also criticized last summer when his first meeting with Horgan following the B.C. premier’s June election purposely did not focus on the pipeline, which Horgan has vowed to do everything he can to stop.B.C.’s opposition, including a threat to bar any additional oil from flowing through B.C., was cited Sunday by Kinder Morgan as the main reason it was suspending all non-essential spending and activities on the pipeline.last_img read more


ExTory Senate leader blasts former colleagues for gutting impaired driving bill

October 17, 2019

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first_imgOTTAWA – A former leader of the Conservatives in the Senate is blasting her erstwhile colleagues for spearheading a move to gut a bill aimed at cracking down on impaired driving.Marjory LeBreton, whose daughter and grandson were tragically killed by a drunk driver 22 years ago, says she’s “appalled” that her former colleagues have succeeded in stripping the centrepiece measure out of Bill C-46.The deleted provision would authorize police to conduct random roadside breathalyzer tests, without needing to have reasonable grounds to suspect the driver may be impaired by alcohol.LeBreton noted that an identical measure was championed by former Conservative public safety minister Steven Blaney in a private member’s bill just two years ago, with the support of some of the same senators who now argue it’s unconstitutional. His bill received unanimous approval in principle from all parties in the House of Commons but did not proceed beyond that stage.“I must tell you in all honesty that I am profoundly disappointed by the actions and words of some of my former colleagues in the Senate and wonder how it is that some have completely reversed themselves on the issue of mandatory alcohol screening,” LeBreton told The Canadian Press in an email.LeBreton had particularly harsh words for Conservative Sen. Denise Batters, who last month persuaded her Conservative colleagues, plus one Liberal independent, on the Senate’s legal and constitutional affairs committee to delete the roadside testing measure from the bill.At the time, Batters argued that a “glut” of impaired driving cases has already resulted in major court delays that have caused other more serious cases to be dismissed — a situation she predicted would only be made worse by approving the constitutionally questionable provision on random alcohol testing in C-46.“I know we don’t want to see many more serious criminal charges like murder, sexual assault, serious child abuse cases dismissed because of the massive amount of charter challenges brought because of the random alcohol testing provisions in this bill,” Batters told the committee.LeBreton said she was “shocked and saddened by the insensitivity” of Batters’ words.“For a senator and a lawyer, to cite ‘more serious criminal charges’ in relation to impaired driving proves yet again that our society and, unfortunately, some of our legislators refuse to acknowledge the seriousness of this preventable crime,” she said.“I would like to remind my former colleague that my daughter and my grandson, who were killed by a drunk driver in 1996, are just as dead as those victims who are dead as a result of her ‘more serious’ crime of ‘murder.’”An attempt earlier this week by independent Sen. Marc Gold to reinstate the provision was defeated on a tie vote of 38-38. Twenty-two Conservative senators voted against reinstatement, while just six supported it.And on Thursday, senators approved Bill C-46, as amended without the measure, in a voice vote.It will now go back to the House of Commons, where the Liberal government has already indicated it will reject the deletion of the random roadside testing provision. Senators will then have to decide whether to bow to the will of the elected chamber or dig in for a protracted parliamentary battle.Constitutional experts are divided on the issue, with some agreeing the provision would likely be struck down as a violation of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and others, including pre-eminent constitutional scholar Peter Hogg, saying it would not.Hogg has argued that the benefit to public safety would be so strong that a court would find the provision to be a justifiable infringement of charter rights.LeBreton, who as government leader in the Senate was a member of Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet from 2006-2013, also doubted a charter challenge would succeed.“The reality is that hundreds of thousands of Canadians are already subject to mandatory screening many times as they go about their lives, whether at airports, entering government buildings, crossing the border or attending pubic events,” said LeBreton, who retired from the Senate in 2015.“I doubt that any Canadian court would rule that these mandatory searches violate one’s charter rights.”To those who contend the existing law on roadside testing, which requires police to have reasonable grounds to suspect alcohol impairment, is working, LeBreton said she’d ask them “if they consider about 1,000 deaths and 60,000 injuries every year (resulting from impaired driving) as a law that is ‘working.’”New Zealand has had mandatory alcohol screening for years and a 2003 study found it’s resulted in a 54 per cent decrease in serious and fatal car crashes, LeBreton said, adding that Ireland has seen a similar reduction since adopting mandatory screening in 2006, along with a big drop in the number of impaired driving charges.Bill C-46 is a companion bill to C-45, the government’s bill to legalize recreational cannabis. However, the roadside testing provision was intended to apply only to alcohol.Liberals suspect Conservative senators’ newfound opposition to the provision has more to do with trying to hold up the government’s plan to legalize cannabis by this summer rather than with its constitutionality.While it would prefer to implement the two bills at the same time, the government has said it will push ahead with legalization without the stiffer impaired driving laws if need be — a position that’s been slammed by Conservative MPs in the Commons.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said two Conservative senators voted for reinstatement.last_img read more


Three people die in small plane crash flying from Ontario to Prince

October 17, 2019

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first_imgA Maine airport manager says three people have died after a small plane that departed from Ontario bound for Prince Edward Island crashed during an attempted landing.Jesse Crandall says witnesses saw the airplane pass over Greenville Municipal Airport before crashing in a field on the approach to the runway on Monday morning.“They turned around over the airport and were coming back, banked sharply … and they hit the ground real hard,” he said in a telephone interview.He says he drove quickly to the airport minutes later but first responders on the scene told him there were no survivors in the mangled twin-engine propeller Aerostar AEST aircraft.Crandall said he’d been receiving calls from aviation authorities informing him that the Canadian plane had communicated it was in distress and needed to make an emergency landing at his community’s airport.“It’s a sad day … and now there’s a whole lot of people hurting from it, all the families,” said Crandall, who is also the town manager.A spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said the plane had departed Pembroke, Ont., and was bound for Charlottetown when it went down in northeastern Maine.A spokeswoman for the Pembroke airport said the flight was one of two that departed around 9 a.m. on Monday morning, but had no information about the nationality of the three on board or the nature of the flight.The National Transportation Safety Agency is looking into the accident and will investigate its probable cause.Agency spokesman Terry Williams said an investigator is en route and will speak to witnesses, arrange for the aircraft to be moved to a secure location and gather evidence such as the engine condition, maintenance condition and the pilot’s records over the next 10 days.Maine State Police spokesman Stephen McCausland was unable to confirm the nationality of those killed.“I have no information on the victims and do not expect any later today,” he said in an email.last_img read more


Federal government announces new measures for killer whale protection

October 17, 2019

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first_imgVANCOUVER – The federal government wants to create new ocean sanctuaries in British Columbia as part of an additional $61.5 million it is spending to protect endangered killer whales.Fisheries and Oceans Minister Jonathan Wilkinson said Wednesday the government also wants to create new areas of critical habitat off the west coast of Vancouver Island for southern resident killer whales.The protected areas of Swiftsure in the Juan de Fuca Strait between Vancouver Island and Washington state, and La Perouse Bank off Tofino will be areas that the whales can call home, he said.“We are in the process of consulting on those new critical habitat areas and expect to be able to move forward on them in the next couple of months,” he said. “We are also talking about creation of killer whale sanctuaries, which essentially are within the areas of critical habitat … which means that we can prohibit a range of different activities, not simply fisheries, where you can regulate that ships cannot go.”The government previously announced $167.4 million would be spent to improve prey availability and reduce disturbances for whales.Southern resident killer whales were listed as endangered in 2003 and only 74 of them remain in the wild.Wilkinson said the government will take a closer look at enhancing food sources for whales by putting money into a new hatchery to increase the stock of chinook salmon.While there have been calls for a ban on chinook salmon fishing, he said the government “hasn’t gone there yet.”“We’ll certainly be looking at the needs of the southern resident killer whales and trying to ensure balancing economic issues with environmental issues,” he said.Earlier this year, the federal government closed about 35 per cent of recreational and commercial chinook fisheries in the Juan de Fuca Strait and around portions of the Gulf Islands.Misty MacDuffee, a conservation biologist at the Raincoast Conservation Foundation in B.C, said she was encouraged by the move to identify sanctuaries where the animals can be protected from fishing and whale watching.She said the government has to increase the number of salmon in the sanctuaries and a hatchery “is not a promising way to do that.”“The best way to increase the abundance of chinook is by closing fisheries.”The Fisheries Department proposal to enhance the availability of chinook in the fall in the Fraser River will not help southern resident killer whales when they need the salmon in the early spring and the summer, MacDuffee said.“The importance of those early time chinook are key to southern resident killer whales,” she said. “What the feds are proposing to do is enhance chinook that are returning in the fall.”In addition to food, Wilkinson said the government is looking at moving shipping lanes further away from areas preferred by killer whales as well as long-term solutions, such as quieter ships to reduce noise from vessels.“With the ferries, they are structured in such a way that reducing the speed doesn’t help as much with the noise.”A conservation agreement is in the works with BC Ferries to ensure its vessels take a wide berth around the whales, he said.Two years ago, Transport Minister Marc Garneau said the government was working with BC Ferries on possible approaches to help decrease noise and traffic.Wilkinson said he hopes to have the bulk of the measures in place by May when the whales return to the area. But it will take some time to reduce noise and purchase ships that are quieter, he said.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version had the incorrect spelling for La Perouse Bank.last_img read more


Health Canada releases draft regulations for edible cannabis products

October 17, 2019

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first_imgOTTAWA — The federal government has released a list of proposed rules for edible cannabis products in Canada as it prepares to add them to the list of legal pot products by next fall.The draft regulations propose a set of hard caps on the amount of THC that could be in any package, depending on the product.Restrictions would be placed on ingredients that would make edible cannabis more appealing to children, such as sweeteners or colourants, or adding ingredients like nicotine that could encourage consumption.Similar restrictions are proposed for topical products and cannabis extracts, and manufacturers would be prohibited from making any claims about health benefits or nutrition on their labels.All packaging would have to be child-resistant and display the standard cannabis symbol with a health warning message.Ottawa is gathering public input on these proposed rules until Feb. 20.Edibles will legalized for sale in Canada no later than Oct. 17, 2019. The Canadian Presslast_img read more


Goodale says report on terror threats maligned certain communities

October 17, 2019

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first_imgOTTAWA — Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says future reports on terrorist threats to Canada will not refer to Sikh extremism and instead use “extremists who support violent means to establish an independent state within India.”Goodale says the language used in his department’s 2018 terror-threat report “unintentionally maligned” certain communities and is not in keeping with Canadian values.But Goodale isn’t going to change the language in the existing document, which drew ire from Canada’s Sikh community, nor has he provided public evidence backing up the decision to include Sikh extremism in the annual report for the first time.Balpreet Singh Boparai, the lawyer for the World Sikh Organization in Canada, says admitting the language was wrong and fixing it in the next report is a small step forward, but questioned why the existing report wouldn’t be revised.He also said Goodale is missing the wider concern that the government has provided no evidence of extremist threats among any Canadians who want to have an independent Sikh state within India, known as Khalistan.The House of Commons public-safety committee voted this week to summon Goodale to appear sometime before the end of June to discuss the concerns about the report.The Canadian Presslast_img read more


Friends Show Appreciation For Robin Williams

October 16, 2019

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first_img“I will never forget the day I met him and he stood on his head in my office chair and pretended to drink a glass of water using his finger like a straw,” director Garry Marshall told the LA Times.There is no doubt that the late actor Robin Williams had a knack for making people laugh. In a statement about his passing from The Juilliard School, where Williams attended in the mid-70s, president Joseph Polisi said, “Robin’s genius for comedic improvisation was matched by his deep understanding of the actor’s art and how to touch his audience in meaningful ways. As an artist, he brought together a unique mix of traditional actor training with a creative spirit that set new standards for performance in cinema, television and live theater.”That Williams brought joy and inspiration is echoed by countless industry people, but there are many actors who also praise him for the profound effect he had directly on their careers.“He made Matt [Damon] and my dreams come true,” said Ben Affleck. “What do you owe a guy who does that? Everything.” Marlee Matlin said, “He was so helpful early in my career. I have no words. I am heartbroken.”Jessica Chastain credits Williams for enabling her to even go to school. “Through a scholarship, he made it possible for me to graduate college,” said Chastain. “We didn’t have a lot of money and Juillard is a pretty expensive school. Robin Williams was a very generous Julliard alumnus and gave a scholarship every two years to a student. It paid for everything and I got it.”Although Chastain never did meet Williams during her time at Julliard, she is still deeply appreciative of the education that was provided for her. “Robin Williams changed my life. His generous spirit will forever inspire me to support others as he supported me.”Copyright ©2014Look to the Starslast_img read more


January Jones And Jon Hamm Attend Oceanas SeaChange Summer Party

October 16, 2019

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first_imgA number of stars attended the 8th annual SeaChange Summer Party in Dana Point on Saturday evening to support Oceana, the world’s largest ocean conservation organization.January Jones at Oceana’s SeaChange Summer PartyCredit/Copyright: Oceana/Nick KoonsAmong the attendees were Jon Hamm, January Jones, Kiernan Shipka, Sam Waterston, Beth Behrs, Michael Gladis, Aimee Teegarden, Nolan Gould, Billy Joe Armstrong, Oscar Nunez, Leonor Varela, Lilimar Hernandez, Olympic swimmer Aaron Peirsol and featured musical performer Bethany Joy Lenz.Jon Hamm and Sam WaterstonCredit/Copyright: Oceana/Tom VickersThe event honored marine ecologist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, Dr. Enric Sala, for his work to protect the world’s last pristine marine ecosystems. The sold out evening was held on the private beaches of The Strand in Dana Point for Oceana. Over 400 guests attended.Oceana ambassador January Jones mingled with guests and addressed the audience about her work with Oceana to protect sharks.“I’ve long been a supporter of Oceana and have been fortunate enough to work with them on their efforts to save sharks,” Jones told the crowd. “These are some of the most fascinating — and threatened — creatures in our oceans.”The evening’s honoree, Dr. Enric Sala, took the stage to accept Oceana’s Ocean Heroes award. Sala, founder and leader of the National Geographic Society’s Pristine Seas project, works with his team to identify, explore, survey and, ultimately, protect the ocean’s last-remaining wild places. His upcoming book PRISTINE SEAS: Journeys to the Ocean’s Last Wild Places (National Geographic Books; September 22, 2015), highlights ten of these untouched sites. Most recently, Sala returned from an expedition to explore the remote Artic seas. Upon receiving his award, he stated:“Protecting the ocean must be a collective effort that involves each and every one of us every day. With the support of organizations like Oceana and National Geographic, we can and will make a difference for the ocean — whether through individual choices or combined action.”SeaChange guests were treated to specialty Nolet cocktails and a delicious dinner. The evening included presentations from Oceana executives and celebrity supporters. Guests also raised their paddles in both silent and live auctions. The program this year focused on Oceana’s Save the Oceans; Feed the World campaign, which aims to restore the biodiversity and abundance of the world’s oceans to support a growing global population.Oceana CEO Andrew Sharpless spoke about Oceana’s work, stating:“Thanks to our SeaChange supporters, Oceana has grown tremendously in the past few years, tackling problems that are global in nature with a country-by-country approach that’s achieving measurable results. Oceana has now protected over 1.2 million square miles of ocean and achieved dozens of policy victories that will protect these places for the future.”The evening was capped with a musical performance by actress and singer Bethany Joy Lenz. Party-goers then spent time dancing in the ocean breeze at the Post Party Lounge.SeaChange was co-chaired by Oceana Board Member Valarie Van Cleave and Oceana Council Member Eve Kornyei Ruffatto.The highlight of the evening auction was the lively bidding for an exquisite retreat at the Gili Lankanfushi Resort in the Maldives. Other items included Corum Watches, a Mikimoto White South Sea pearl necklace with matching earrings, custom suits from David August and Brioni, gorgeous handbags from Emilio Pucci, Versace, Bottega, Giorgio Armani, Fendi, Miu Miu, Bally, MaxMara, Longchamp and items from other South Coast Plaza luxury boutiques including Jo Malone, Baccarat, Salvatore Ferragamo, Prada, and Hervé Léger. Stunning jewelry was featured from Winston’s Crown Jewelers, Kimberlin Brown, Julia Post, J. B. Diamonds, Kendra Scott and more.Fabulous trips included a getaway to Sir Richard Branson’s private island in the British Vigrin Islands, a stay at the luxurious Amanyara in Turks & Caicos, and a vacation at the French Chateau of the Count & Countess de Vanssay in the Loire Valley. Other trips included stays at the Las Ventanas al Parasio in San Jose del Cabo, the Montage Kapalua Bay in Maui, the Chabil Mar in Belize, and the La Morada Hotel in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. A BMW i8 Electric Sports Car and custom set of Louis Vuitton luggage was auctioned off to a lucky bidder.The SeaChange Summer Party is made possible by the generous support from various distinguished local and international businesses and philanthropists. Special thanks to presenting sponsor BMWi and the Orange County BMW Dealers, media sponsor Coast Magazine, liquor sponsors Nolet Spirits and Ketel One Partners, wine donated by Chloe Wine Collection and gift sponsors Bloomingdale’s Fashion Island and Links London. SeaChange partners and underwriters include the Harriet E. Pfleger Foundation, Tricia and Michael Berns, Eve and Mike Ruffatto, Wendy and Rick Aversano, Julie and Peter Hill, Jean and Tim Weiss, Elizabeth Wahler and LadyLux, Britt and Robert Meyer, Betsy and Andy Ackerman, Janet and Carl Nolet, The Fanticola and Knode Families, Nancy and Jim Salomon, Joanne Artman Gallery, Carol and Dennis Berryman, Fiona and Tod Bensen, Dr. Danni Sun, Barbara and Greg MacGillivray, Marisa and Steve Robbins, Laura and Lou Rohl, Versace, Bonnie Lee and Justin Pham, Leslie and Dino Cancellieri, Mary and John Carrington, Maralou and Jerry Harrington, Bloomingdales, Prada, Dior, Susie and George Wood, Ocean Institute, Laurie Rodnick and Thomas Moore, Bhadra and Mark Gordon, Barbara Streisand Foundation, Summer Crosley, Danielle Steakley, Commerce Printing, and Signature Party Rentals.last_img read more


Your Chance To Join Charlize Theron At The Fate Of The Furious

October 16, 2019

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first_imgHere’s your chance to join Charlize Theron at the premiere of The Fate Of The Furious in New York – and help charity at the same time.Join Charlize Theron at The Fate Of The Furious premiereOmaze is giving you and a friend the chance to: *Join the Fast family at the premiere of The Fate of the Furious *Snap a photo with Charlize Theron and Dwayne Johnson on the red carpet *Get a drink (or two) with Charlize at the VIP after-party *Get flown out to New York and put up in a 4-star hotelAll you need to do is head over to omaze.com and donate to the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project. The more you donate, the more entires to win this fantastic experience. Plus, there are all sorts of goodies available as extra incentives to give.Founded by the Academy Award winning actor and UN Messenger of Peace, the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project’s (CTAOP) mission is to invest in African youth to keep themselves safe from HIV/AIDS. Primarily focusing on Charlize’s home country of South Africa, which has the largest HIV positive population in the world, the Project supports community engaged organizations that use innovative and community specific programming to work with youth between the ages of 10-20 years old. These organizations provide critical resources like access to youth friendly health care, sexual and reproductive health education, life skills, and psychosocial support – all of which empower young people to keep themselves and their peers HIV free.last_img read more


Celebrities Support US Bill To Ban Wild Animal Circus Acts

October 16, 2019

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first_imgRicky Gervais, Pamela Anderson, Joanna Lumley, Shelley Morrison, and Marilu Henner are among a host of international stars supporting a campaign by Animal Defenders International (ADI) to end the suffering of wild animals in travelling circuses in the United States, through the passing of H.R. 1759, the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act (TEAPSPA).Ahead of World Circus Day, 21st April, ADI called on the public to visit shows where the acts have a choice about performing, and ask their Representatives to support TEAPSPA, as urged by celebrity supporters.Multi-award-winning actor and comedian, writer, producer, director, musician Ricky Gervais: “For animals in circuses, there is no escape from the merry-go-round of imprisonment, deprivation, and being forced to perform. Elephants, lions, tigers, bears, and others live a life of desperation and fear. It doesn’t have to be this way. Please support the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act and help end the use of wild animal acts.”Pamela Anderson, actress, model; internationally known for Baywatch: “Circuses like to give the idea that the animals are having fun, that’s an illusion. Animals in circuses suffer a life of deprivation, chained, and tied up, and a brutal culture where they are kicked, punched, whipped, and beaten. The circus is no fun for the animals, it has to stop. Support ADI’s call for a federal ban on wild animals in circuses.”Actress Joanna Lumley, award-winning star of Absolutely Fabulous, said: “No animal should be caged and trained to perform in the grim circumstances of a circus life. The world has changed and grown up; compassion to all living creatures must be our watchword. No circus should keep animals in these shameful and cruel conditions, and no animals should be made to exist purely for our dubious entertainment.”Beloved actress from Will & Grace, Shelly Morrison: “It may be a dream for some to run away with the circus, but for the animals it’s a nightmare. Life on the road in tiny cages, nowhere to run, takes a terrible toll, and you can see the animals literally going out of their minds. Please urge your representative to support TEAPSPA and help end their suffering.”Marilu Henner, Golden Globe nominated actress from Taxi, “These intelligent, social wild animals live sad lives on the road, confined to parking lots, deprived of everything natural… There is no place for cruelty in entertainment, and thankfully Congress has an opportunity to end this circus abuse. Please act now to support the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act. This bill will protect elephants, tigers, bears, and other wild animals from being forced to suffer in travelling performances.”Audiences have been turning away from animal circuses in droves; several, including Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus, have closed, while others have gone animal-free and thrived. Over 80 US jurisdictions in 31 states have now taken action to restrict wild animal circus acts.Studies and evidence has shown that the health and welfare of animals in travelling circuses is inevitably compromised due to necessarily small, barren, mobile accommodations, restriction of movement, long journeys and excessive periods of time spent in transporters and containers.Training methods are brutal and ADI undercover investigations have documented the violence and abuse occurring in the U.S. and worldwide. The tools of the trade include stun guns and other electric prods, metal bars, whips, bullhooks (a heavy bar with a sharpened point and hook), deprivation of food and water, and intimidation.These stressed wild animals also represent a threat to public safety. Escaped animals have maimed and killed workers and members of the public, including children, and animals escaping from temporary facilities in city centres or onto busy roads present hazards.Supporting the reintroduction of TEAPSPA, by Representatives Ryan Costello (R-PA) and Raul Grijalva (DA-AZ) in March 2017, ADI launched ‘The Reluctant Entertainers’, an online video featuring Ed Asner, Danny Boyle, Brian Blessed, James Cromwell, Jorja Fox, Tonya Kay, Kim Matula, Moby, Eric Roberts, Mindy Sterling, Eric Szmanda, Alexandra Paul, and Diane Warren. Its simple message: “Leave the entertaining to the people who want to perform, they have a choice.” Watch it here.ADI President Jan Creamer said: “The circus of the future is one without animals. Animal Defenders International has repeatedly documented the suffering and abuse of circus animals, in the US and around the world. Over 40 countries have taken action to end these compromising acts, it is time now for the US to act. To help stop circus suffering, never visit a circus with animals and ask your Representatives to support TEAPSPA today.”For more information about TEAPSPA, click here.last_img read more


REMINDER REELWORLD FILM FESTIVAL DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS TODAY

October 15, 2019

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first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Awards & Prizes Advertisement Now in its 17th year, the Reelworld Film Festival is dedicated to using film as a force for social good. Founded in 2001 by Tonya Williams, Reelworld is a platform for underrepresented voices to showcase Canadian and international films that explore current and pressing social issues facing the world.Reelworld showcases narrative features, documentaries, shorts, music videos, episodic content and VR/360 films that tell important stories, spark meaningful dialogue and inspire social change. Advertisement Advertisement Eligibility– Submissions must have been completed after January 1, 2016;– All submissions and exhibitions must be in English, subtitled in English or English versioned;– Must not be available online, via any home device (blu-ray, DVD, etc.) or released theatrically in Canada at the time of the festival exhibition;– Entrant confirms and warrants required legal authority to submit the entry into the Festival and to use all music, images, and content in the entry; and– Rough cuts and works-in-progress will not be considered. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION – CLICK HERE Twitter Login/Register With: Facebook All selected short and feature-length films will be considered by the jury:1. The Impact Award – Short Film: awarded to the director of the short film selected as most impactful and capable of inspiring social change (juried).2. The Impact Award – Feature Film: awarded to the director of the feature length film selected as most impactful and capable of inspiring social change (juried).3. The Audience Award: awarded to the director of the feature length film chosen by audience members by way of ballot (audience choice).4. The Emerging Storyteller Award: awarded to a first time director in either the feature film, episodic, or short film categories (juried).5. Best Music Video Award: awarded to the director of the music video selected as most impactful in conveying message (juried). Rules & Termslast_img read more


Art Gallery of Ontario names new top curator

October 15, 2019

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first_imgAdvertisement The Art Gallery of Ontario ended a yearlong vacancy for its top curatorial position Thursday, naming British-born Julian Cox as its chief curator.“I wasn’t quick out of the gate,” said the AGO’s CEO and director Stephan Jost, regarding the time frame within which Cox was chosen. Jost, who took over as director in the spring of 2016, intentionally put off the search for six months. Being new, “I wanted to get to know the curators we had, to make sure we hired the right person,” he said. “We have a huge diversity of approaches at the AGO and I wanted to be sure we had the right fit.”As chief curator, Cox assumes oversight of all of the gallery’s exhibitions and content. His predecessor, Stephanie Smith, left the gallery in October 2016. She had been in the position only two years. READ MORE Login/Register With: Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Julian Cox, a Brit by way of San Francisco, is the Art Gallery of Ontario’s new chief curator. (COURTESY ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO) Advertisement Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more