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…on the move

May 12, 2021

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Neil Patrick has decided toleave the HR industry after 30 years. After three years at StoddardInternational, as head of HR. Patrick, 47, (right) took up his new post asassociate director last month of recruitment company Ian Young ExecutiveSearch. Neil previously held the top HR jobin paper manufacturer Inveresk and knitwear manufacturer Lyle and Scott.Patrick will be succeeded by Gordon Watts who has been promoted from within thecompany.Cherri Marshall hasbeen appointed HR manager at profession services company Deloitte and Touche.Marshall, who started her new position last month, moved from her role as HRconsultant for Axa Insurance. She had previously worked for four years assenior HR officer with Nestlé UK.Paul Harris has beenappointed personnel officer at Warrington Borough Council. He will focus hisattentions on advice and support, training and sickness. Previously Harris waspersonnel officer (resource and relations) for at Knownley Metropolitan BoroughCouncil.which he joined in 1997.Ken Bryant has beenappointed HR manager with Bevan Ashford Solicitors (West Country). He is taskedwith earning the solicitors the Investors in People Award – a feat he achievedin his former position as personnel and training manager at Devon Training forSkills. His priorities in his new role will be to improve the appraisal systemand training for the companies 250 staff.Top jobCarolyn Gray has been appointeddirector of policy and services at manufacturing company Smiths Group.Gray, who started last month,  moved from her position as head of HR policyand HR strategy for e-commerce at Sainsbury’s.  She says she is “hugelyexcited” about her new role and the challenges it will bring. Last yearSmiths merged with engineering company TI group and she will be heavilyinvolved in merging the companies’ two HR policies.Fellow of the CIPD, Gray’s focalpoint will be the development of e-HR strategies, including the installationand implementation of Smiths’ global HR system.Gray said, “I am energised bymy new position, the challenges are immense. I will be able to make use of myexperiences in every HR function, but am really looking forward to using my e-HRknowledge to improve the company’s communication and increase theorganisation’s profits.” Gray will report to Anne Minto,director of HR, along with John Ginn who has also joined Smith’s HR team asdirector of compensation and benefits.Personal profileChristine Hurst is HR directorat Radiant Networks She moved to Radiant after a period as an HR consultant.Before that Hurst was HR director at cable comms company Bell Cablemedia. Shewas a member of the HR steering committee that took the company into a four-waymerger to form Cable & Wireless Communications.What is the mostimportant lesson you have learnt in your career?How theenvironment in which people work and how they are managed can change theirbehaviour.What is the strangestsituation you have had to deal with at work?Being held”hostage” in my office for three hours while an employee stood on thewindow ledge threatening to jump (he didn’t!)If you had two wishes to changeyour company, what would they be?To keep oursurroundings but be located nearer London (for recruitment), and to be theemployer of choice in the broadband wireless sector.What is the best thingabout working in HR?Being able toinfluence people’s working lives.What is the worst?Not always being able tosay what I think.If you could adopt themanagement style of a historical character, whose would you adopt and why?Bill Clinton because heseems to be able to get away with anything and still get respect.What would you do if you had morespare time?Read more books andshop  – not the kind you do inSainsbury’s.If you were to write abook, which subject would you choose to write about?Following IQ and EQ I’dwrite a book called 0Q about how it’s possible to do well in the business worldwithout formal qualifications. Comments are closed. …on the moveOn 6 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


Look who’s talking

May 12, 2021

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first_img Comments are closed. Look who’s talkingOn 1 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today HelenVandevelde detonates the debate about foreign language training and gives herview that it has benefits which you probably haven’t thought ofAEurobarometer survey just out suggests that English is fast becoming the internationallanguage of the European Union. Asked whether everyone in the EU should speakEnglish, two-thirds of the 16,000 participants said “yes”.Thesurvey could not have come at a worse time for those who argue that people inthe UK should do more to acquire foreign language skills. At the end of lastyear, the Nuffield Languages Inquiry published its report, Languages: the nextgeneration, urging the establishment of a national strategy, complete with itsown supremo with direct access to the Cabinet Office. Andlast month saw the official launch of the European Commission’s project, theEuropean Year of Languages.Thenatural response from the monolingual tendency is to say, “Why bother ifeveryone else is going to learn English anyway?” – 40 per cent of thosesurveyed claimed to be able to use English as a foreign language. Ifyou add the 16 per cent of EU citizens who speak English as their firstlanguage, we’re already over halfway to English being the common language ofthe organisation (French and German come next with around one-third of the EUpopulation being able to speak them).Sohow strong is the case for the Brits to get off their bottom position in theEuropean language league? The problem with the debate about foreign languageacquisition is that it hasn’t been a debate at all. We’vehad a serial procession of worthy reports about the importance of languagelearning since the 1960s. They all warn of the job losses that will arisebecause we can’t speak the languages of our customers. And here we are in 2001,still unable to unveil the first person to be made redundant because theycouldn’t speak German or Spanish. Noone ever puts forward the case that we shouldn’t learn languages. Why shouldthey? Who would ever come up with a campaign slogan that goes, “Let’s justnot bother”?Theconsequence of the absence of debate is that the case in favour of languages isseen as special pleading on the part of vested interests like commerciallanguage trainers. So, how strong is the case against language training forbusiness?Infact, there’s a lot to be said against language learning in terms of itsopportunity cost. It takes a long time to learn. It’s expensive. And unlike forthose in all the other EU countries, except Ireland, there isn’t an obviousforeign language to learn.It’sthe long lead times that are the biggest problem for UK plc. If you want toexpand into Portugal or Greece, you can’t afford to hang around until yourstaff know how to ask for a business card in the relevant foreign language. Andwhat if your staff start to learn German but economic conditions require you toswitch to Spain? You’ll never see morale plummet so fast.Addto that the specialist language services available to companies seeking toexpand into new markets, and the coffin lid for languages looks firmly screwedon. Whybother training your staff when you can access multilingual call centres,specialist translation and interpretation services, not to mention targetedpromotional campaigns with in-depth knowledge of the culture and expectationsof the target market? If you’re still keen to pursue an in-house solution, theobvious route is to recruit the expertise you need, rather than spending yearsdeveloping it.Sohas the recent development of specialist language services weakened the casefor foreign language acquisition? Paradoxically the answer is “no”.Butthe strength of the argument in favour hasn’t been made by the lobbyists inreports like Languages: the next generation. What they have missed is the divergenceof interest between the individual and the company. The business case forlanguage development is marginal other than where there are unusualcombinations of circumstances, such as the need to collaborate closely withspecialists in a minority language area. Forthe individual, the position can be very different. The need to invest inlong-term employability makes foreign language acquisition attractive,especially for world languages like Mandarin Chinese and Arabic that have lowexposure in the West. Aswe’ve seen, the better solution for the company is to recruit for languageskills rather than to train for them. So for the individual, having the rightcombination of expertise and language skills can turn them into a piece of hotmerchandise.Andthis is just where the interests of the company reconnect to those of theindividual. Businesses whose success depends on their ability to attracttalented staff understand that the best way to retain talented staff is toinvest in their employability. So the smart thinking in company training isaround enabling good people to pursue their own career aspirations, includingforeign language acquisition.Thereare backwash advantages for the company too. Graham Heard, lecturer inlanguages and pre-MBA course director at the Cranfield School of Management, isconscious of the development of cross-cultural communication as a businessnorm. He has noticed how often first language English speakers get intodifficulty when communicating with speakers of English as an additionallanguage.”Nativespeakers have to become aware that their complex use of language isn’t going tobe understood by foreigners, even those who seem to speak English well.Learning a new language yourself helps you to develop that sensitivity.”MaryOrr, professor of French Studies at Exeter University, reinforces thecollateral benefits that arise from language learning. “If you speakanother language, you are sensitive to different things because you’re notquite a native. And that gives you a flexibility and self-awareness that amonolingual speaker never develops.”Thereis, then, a strong case to be made for company-sponsored foreign languageacquisition. But the arguments are more subtle than the white noise generatedby the language lobbyists. Languagetraining needs to be rescued from the tumbleweed sidings that the lobbyistshave shunted it into. As an option to be pursued within the broader context ofrecruitment, retention and motivation strategies, it could have a vibrantfuture.www.cilt.org.uk/ey12001/    [email protected]’cornerTheCouncil of Europe and the European Union have joined forces to implement the EYL,as the European Year of Languages 2001 is known.Theaims of the EYL include:–To increase awareness of Europe’s linguistic heritage and openness to differentlanguages and cultures as a source of mutual enrichment –Motivating European citizens to develop a degree of communicative ability in anumber of languages, in order to improve active participation in Europeandemocratic processes–Encouraging and supporting language learning for personal developmentTwomajor instruments to promote plurilingualism developed in the context of theModern Languages Project in Strasbourg will be launched:–The Common European Framework of reference – a tool for all those concernedlanguage coaching–The European Language Portfolio – to a personal record for learners Forinformation on EYL events in the UK, contact the Centre for Information onLanguage Teaching and Research  [email protected]   or   www.cilt.org.uk/ey12001/ Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


Letters to the editor

May 12, 2021

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first_imgDo you have any comments or views on articles that have appeared in globalhror on the global HR profession in general? If so, write to the editor at:globalhr, 3rd Floor, RBI, Quadrant House, The Quadrant, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5AS,UK. E-mail: [email protected] new hot targets The article ‘The new hot targets’ in your February/March issue raised anumber of pertinent issues. I couldn’t agree more with the closing statement that employers who keep aneye on the market will be the ones with the fewest recruitment problems. As itmentions, there is a current skills shortage in the IT sector with a projectedfuture shortage. Now Microsoft has plans to acquire PWA – a Great PlainsCompany, this potential shortfall has never been more of a concern. In times ofchange, these passive seekers could become attractive targets for competitors.As a result, a primary acquisition objective is 100% retention of staff, which,in tune with the article, illustrates how important it is to retain valuedemployees. In an extreme way, the article highlights the importance of sourcing passivejob seekers internally too. Enormous talent can be discovered and redeployed byknowing your teams better and understanding what makes an individual tick. Thebenefits of internal headhunting are exponential. It creates a sense ofsatisfaction and respect from individuals who’ve been headhunted not byexternal agents, but from perhaps a more surprising internal source. People will be hired – and retained – for their ability to contribute to theorganisation, rather than to ‘do the job’. Job descriptions will graduallydisappear, to be replaced by aptitudes, abilities and cultural compatibilities.e-HR is currently a much-used phrase, but it’s important that HR people donot banish it as an IT project. e-HR should manifest itself throughout theorganisation, enabling it to rise above the competition. It’s something that,if done correctly and completely in tune with company strategy and culture, cantruly make a difference to results. Organisations must do their utmost to look after their own employees,develop their skills and empower them to empower the company. Adrian Hobbs Chief Operating Officer, PWA – A Great Plains Company Marlow, UK Diversity in europe? It is widely acknowledged that black graduates are under-represented in thegraduate recruitment programmes of global employers. To the extent thatdiversity means “thinking differently”, a company whose workforce isless diverse may find less creative solutions to problems. Perhaps morerelevantly, clients, the media and next year’s tranche of graduates arestarting to demand true diversity in the workforce – even in Europe. Recruiting teams understand that the problem is not caused by anydiscrimination by the managers who make the final hiring decisions. Rather, thereason I hear most often from employers in Europe is that few black candidatesapply for the jobs in the first place. Since the college presentations are opento all with the interest and the appropriate degree subject and year ofgraduation, there seems to be little that can be done to encourage more blackapplicants. In fact, there are lots of initiatives that partially succeed in targetingblack students, but none that seems to do anything more than identifycandidates who were going to apply anyway. In an ideal world, the resumés ofall black undergraduates would be available in one place for the employer toaccess. My company, DiversityNow, is co-ordinating the Alliance of British &European Afro-Caribbean Societies to provide a means for employers to reachthousands of black candidates before the campus presentations begin. The ideais for companies to target a group of people who are simply not applying in thefirst place and currently have no intention of attending the campuspresentation. Employers in consulting, banking and other industries are usingthe Alliance to target black students. But even with their efforts, it will takeyears rather than months to correct the perception that employers in Europe donot care that much about diversity. Peter Harrison Chief Executive Officer, DiversityNow London, UK Letters to the editorOn 1 May 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


Desperate bid for staff worsens war for talent

May 12, 2021

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Employers have to develop the potential of their existing staff instead ofdesperately recruiting new people in order to compete in the war for talent. Research called People: The Phoney War? shows that high levels ofrecruitment are having a limited impact on the profitability of companies. While median profitability was up 6 per cent in 2000, the wealth created perfull-time employee had fallen by 30 per cent since 1999, according to the jointresearch by SHL and EP-Saratoga. Roger Austin, commercial director at SHL, claims that the skills shortage isbeing exacerbated by firms hoarding staff. He said, “Companies are snapping up all the available talent to getahead of their competitors, without having a role for them. The upshot is thatthese employees will not be productive, will get bored and then leave. “Recruiting employees is also more expensive, as you often pay a highersalary for less experienced staff than the ones the company already employs.Existing employees can then get dissatisfied and will also leave.” Line managers have to improve their people management skills to developexisting staff, said Austin. The report, released exclusively to Personnel Today, surveyed 1,250 Europeancompanies across six different sectors, including retail and finance. Comments are closed. Desperate bid for staff worsens war for talentOn 19 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


Placing HR on the agenda

May 12, 2021

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first_imgHow can HR directors best grab thelimelight as CEOs look for short-term profits? Keith Rodgers reports that often it is a matter of taking something tothe table that will grab the attention of the boardIf you’re strugglingto understand why human capital management tends to slip off your board meetingagenda with such depressing regularity, consider this simple equation putforward by the HR director of a large multinational. A serious attempt to raisethe value of human capital takes three to five years. The average incumbency ofa chief executive is between three to four years, and falling. What kind ofnewly appointed leader is going to commit to a project that in all likelihoodwill exceed their own tenure?The question, whilesomewhat cynical, is asked from the perspective of years of senior-levelexperience in the HR field. This is not someone who believes HR has anunwritten right to be represented on the board, nor one who argues that HRissues should be the top priority for every CEO. Rather, it’s raised in thecontext of boardroom reality.While every companytalks a good story about the value of their employees, the harsh truth for manycompanies is that their actions don’t back up their best intentions. In apecking order where the likes of finance, operations, sales, marketing and ITare all vying for position, getting HR issues onto the table can be a toughtask.HR is fighting backhard, however, and some of the largest companies can demonstrate in practicalterms that their boards, from the CEO down, have committed topeople-development principles. Organisations like BT, DHL, Boots, TRW andothers are undergoing major change – from distributing the HR function acrossthe enterprise to measuring leadership skills and shop-floor satisfaction –which reflect a fundamental acceptance of the importance of strong humancapital management throughout their organisation. The big question for theirpeers is how these groundbreaking initiatives can be driven through andsupported in their own boardrooms.Mark Geary, managingdirector of AsiaNet Consultants in Hong Kong, believes that the issues facingHR directors are both structural and philosophical. With over 20 yearsexperience on three continents, including senior executive positions at ICI,Ladbroke, Inchcape and InterContinental Hotels, Geary has witnessed thechallenges HR faces in a variety of organisations.He believes that whilehuman capital management is an increasingly high-profile issue, there are fewconcrete examples of companies practising it. Part of the problem is theendemic obsession with short-term strategy. Twenty years ago, companiesreported their results on an annual basis, today the emphasis is on hittingquarterly numbers. “It’s focused on the share price, they look at thecosts they can influence in the short term. For many companies, labour costsare a significant item,”  saysGeary.Many of HR’s problemslie with the accounting profession. “Machinery can be depreciated overseven to 10 years, computer software over five years. But human capital – it’snot on the balance sheet. There is no proper consideration given to the valueof a company’s human resources, no depreciation, no annual maintenance budget.If the same detailed financial management was given to people as it is tomachines I believe companies would be a lot healthier.”That obsession withnumbers is exaggerated in instances where the CEO and other senior managers aredriven by large share option packages. But there are also subtler factors atplay, linking back to the argument about a CEO’s tenure. The issue here,according to the HR director of the multinational mentioned above, is not justthe timescale – it’s also the conflict between corporate and personal needs. The first part of anew leader’s reign, he argues, is often occupied in clearing out part or evenall of the old guard, and bringing in trusted lieutenants – trust-ed, that is,in terms of their loyalty to the CEO. Non-executivedirectors, the people who backed the leader’s appointment, inevitably fall intoline and support the new team. Together, this band of senior executives spends timeassessing corporate strategy, refines the vision, sets out plans to execute onthe new direction and finally gets the operational machine moving.Through all of thistime, often a period of painful change, the CEO is looking to secure thesupport of his or her appointees, and ensure that power brokers emerging fromwithin the corporate ranks can also be brought onside. “Where doesmeasuring human capital come in with this sort of scenario?” he asks.”Not that high.”Faced with these kindsof political problems, senior HR executives argue HR has to take a pragmaticstance to get itself heard. If the driving force in the boardroom is numbers,then HR has to be armed with its own statistics to reinforce its business case.As Richard Townsend, adivisional HR director at DHL, argues, “In terms of what gets you listenedto in the boardroom, you need convincing data that says this will be the impacton productivity and profit. When a company leader is driven by doing deals, nomatter what metrics the HR director has, it doesn’t get listened to. But ifyou’re trying to talk in a boardroom and you don’t have metrics, you’re notgoing to get listened to anyway.” Townsend is keen todifferentiate between “rear-view mirror” metrics – particularlyexternal benchmarking data that tends to be historically focused – and datathat “drives the future”. He says, “In my experience, if youhave internal comparative benchmarks, you are more likely to excite themanagers into action. If their colleagues can produce excellence, they can doso too.”A team of businessmanagers and HR professionals at DHL is currently working on an initiative todevelop what it calls “HR productivity metrics with a purpose”, inthe course of which it’s asking hard questions about the practical value ofdifferent types of measurement. They range from “Is it real?” and”Is it a priority?” to pragmatic questions such as “What are wereally going to do about it?” and “What are the specific actionplans?””There’s no pointin having 101 metrics if you’re only looking at two or three of them,”says Townsend.Most HR professionalsagree that effective metrics are critical in allowing HR’s voice to be heard.Geary, for example, argues that the HR profession has not been as numerate asit should be, but believes that the core metrics, including links between staffattitude and customer satisfaction, are not too hard to produce. More importantly, theyneed to be fed back into operations for continual improvement. At Inchcape’sToyota business in Hong Kong, for example, Geary’s team carried out research tomeasure what customers saw as important when purchasing a car, and whatemployees believed the motivators were. The cross-match threw forward differingperspectives that helped define the forward-looking business plan. “Itwasn’t difficult to convince the CEO,” he says. “If you give him asimple survey about employees, he’s listening. It’s all about theapproach.” Ultimately, however,HR’s ability to influence board-level opinion can only be demonstrated by concreteresults, and it’s abundantly clear that those companies embarking onleading-edge human capital projects tend also to be the companies that enjoysupport from the top down. As such, the critical issue is not how HR persuadesthe board to support certain programmes as much as how closely HR’s visionmatches the overall business goals. This difference isevident at Boots in the UK, which is currently rolling out a leadershipdevelopment programme for its 200 top managers – one which, according to grouppersonnel director Andy Smith, was driven by the HR department and the CEO inconcert. Under the programme, conducted in association with Hay Group, Bootsinterviewed a range of employees with different performance records from thetop three tiers of management. That helped it define a leadership model,incorporating Hay Group’s competency assessments, which provides the frameworkto build individual development programmes. Additionally, it’s been able toaggregate  all the competency dataaround three leadership elements – thinking, pace and team – and assess the group’s overall skill levels. As a result, it hasidentified a need to boost its team leadership skills, and is incorporating theleadership model into its recruitment processes. Significantly, board membershave both driven the process and been interviewed as part of the leadershipskills research.John Steele, grouppersonnel director at BT, argues that rolling out any kind of advanced HRprogramme requires this kind of board level involvement. The heavily unionisedcompany has been through intense restructuring during Steele’s 11-year tenure,with staff numbers being halved from 250,000 to 125,000 over that period – andHR has been at the centre throughout. “There’s arealisation at chairman and CEO level that without people you’re not going tochange your strategy,” says Steele. He argues, however, that HR also hasits own responsibilities in driving its agenda. ‘You have to have an HRfunction that is appropriately skilled and has some strong players on it. Youneed a group of people who are business people first, HR professionals second,and who have the ability to work with and influence their colleagues.” Four years ago, Steeleseparated out BT’s transactional HR work into a shared services centre, whichis now run as a 50/50 joint venture with Accenture. At the same time, thevalue-added  HR consulting services weremoved into the line of business, with each divisional CEO now working with itsown HR director. Now, compared with a 10,000-strong HR function when Steelejoined, the total numbers across the group have dropped to 600.TRW, the internationalautomotive, aerospace and IT company, is going through a similar process toalign HR with the individual business functions. Previously, the UK divisionoperated nine facilities, each with their own management team and HRdepartment, and with a range of different HR procedures covering areas such assickness, absence and overtime. Now, the company is reorganising in preparationfor opening a shared services centre next year, either internal or outsourced,to handle transactional operations.Meanwhile, like BT,other key HR personnel have joined the management teams of the business unitsthemselves. According tovice-president of HR, Doug McIldowie, the whole restructuring programme – whichincludes the cost of installing a backbone HR IT system from Peoplesoft and ashop floor self-service HR system for its 3,500 UK staff – is expected to getpayback within less than a year. Board-level backinghas also allowed TRW to embark on more advanced retention and measurementprogrammes, based around an internal “assignment” culture. Here, theconcept of “jobs” is replaced by serial projects, offering employeesthe chance to continually develop new skills and, if they wish, to switchlocations both nationally and internationally.The company isbuilding individual assessments that log employee’s competencies and skills,developing an ongoing profile based on individual performance measurement ofeach assignment. However much thesekinds of initiatives reflect HR’s strategic importance. McIldowie believes thatHR directors will always have a specific position within the boardroomhierarchy. Even if human capital is a CEO imperative, HR’s own role is primarilyas an influencer. “We’re a supportservice – we’re not going to be like the operations vice-president or theengineering vice-president or the customer vice-president. Our role is to makethem successful in getting equipment out of the door or developing newbusiness. We never have power, but we have more influence.”Capturing the board’sattention As they battle topursue their agendas, HR directors across industry tend to come across abroadly similar range of issues – getting boardroom backing at a strategiclevel, getting the necessary funds for specific investments and then executinghuman capital management projects. According to RichardTownsend, a divisional HR director at DHL, the first, basic priority is for HRto express itself in terms that line of business managers understand, ratherthan being seen to drive its own agenda. Grabbing airtime, he adds, ultimatelycomes down to respect.”It does dependon the dynamics of the team. Sometimes the HR director will have already provedto be adding value, by finding great people, or giving the CEO insight into howto build the business,” he says. “Sometimes there’s almost a ‘proveyourself first’ feeling. I can think of two individuals in Top Twenty Corporationswho have gained credibility by helping recruit and then develop the top team.Other HR directors will have been thrown into the team and will have to provethemselves.” In terms ofinvestment, Andy Smith, group personnel director at Boots, says that provingthe business case is essential – but it doesn’t always require a financialreturn on investment. When pushing through Boots’ leadership developmentprogramme at board level, he says the process was eased by the fact there wasan underlying assumption it needed to be done. While the HRdepartment was required to put forward a business case for the total spend, thedecision to hire Hay Group and the investment in management  time, there was no insistence on provingthat a particular pound spend would deliver a specific increase in sales. That wasn’t the casein his previous position at Boots the Chemist, where the company underwent abehavioural change project within the stores for customer-facing staff. Theproject, designed to raise awareness of customer issues and get employees totake ownership of their business units, included the use of BalancedScorecard  methodologies  measuring finance, operations, people andcustomers. In this case, the project team had to commit to increasing sales at20-odd pilot stores by some 2 per cent in comparison to similar outlets. John Steele, grouppersonnel director at BT, agrees that the board’s financial  perspective of HR is as important as theCEO’s strategic commitment to human capital. “Some of these programmes doneed investment, so you have to start looking at people programmes as aninvestment, not a cost – although you have to keep challenging yourself aboutwhether you’re using the budget effectively.”Once human capital hasbeen placed on the agenda, most HR directors believe the functions’ prioritiesboil down to similar core issues. Alongside compensation, training anddevelopment activities and headcount overhead issues, Smith argues that the topissues at board level essentially boil down to two factors – “Have we gotthe right people in place and have the individuals got what it takes to take uswhere we need to be?” Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Placing HR on the agendaOn 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


Poor conditions pushing staff out of call centres

May 12, 2021

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first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Poor conditions pushing staff out of call centresOn 24 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Call centres are still struggling to retain staff because of anti-socialshift patterns, poor pay and stressful working conditions, according to a majorreport on the industry. The study, published last week, reveals that although there have beenimprovements in training, career progression, flexible working and bonusschemes, call centres are still failing to retain staff. Pay and Conditions in Call Centres 2002 reveals that call centre managersbelieve that low pay rates are the most important factor in losing staff. Paylevels for new staff are still only £12,400 on average, despite increasesacross the sector of 4.6 per cent last year. Six out of 10 of the 133 organisations polled cite retention problems – upfrom half in last year’s survey. Average staff turnover rates have increased by2.5 per cent to 24.5 per cent since 2001. Half of the call centre organisations polled also report difficultiesrecruiting staff. Sarah Miller, one of the report’s authors, believes that staff burn-out isone of the main reasons for the staffing problems.It shows that a third ofcompanies run a 24-hour, seven-day week operation, while three out of 10 areopen seven days a week. “More work needs to be done on flexible working and job designs – theroles need to be less monotonous. Staff need to be multi-skilled and given morebreaks. It takes more than pay [to retain staff],” said Miller. Shey Garland, chief executive at Garland Call Centre – who has ultimateresponsibility for HR – agrees that one of the keys to retention is to makework interesting. She said: “The main reasons for staff leaving is boredomand stress. Variation is key.” By Paul Nelsonwww.incomesdata.co.uk Comments are closed. last_img read more


Recruits jump ship after bad start with new organisations

May 12, 2021

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first_img Comments are closed. Recruits jump ship after bad start with new organisationsOn 14 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article More than half of employees strongly regret accepting a new job immediatelyafter joining an organisation, a survey claims. The study also shows that 26 per cent of respondents voluntarily left theirjobs within one month because they were treated poorly by their new employers. Nick Hood, senior London partner of Begbies Traynor, which carried out theresearch in conjunction with online directory UK Net Guide, said the findingsshow how important it is for employers to spend time helping new starters tosettle in. “If staff leave during the first few weeks of joining, the organisationhas to meet more costs both in time and money recruiting replacements. “It is far simpler and more cost effective to ensure they are properlyintegrated in the first place,” he said. The survey also shows that 59 per cent of new starters had simply been leftto their own devices during their first day at work and nearly half had notbeen allocated a desk. www.begbies-traynor.co.uklast_img read more


IOSH 2004 International Conference and Exhibition

May 12, 2021

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first_imgIOSH2004 International Conference and Exhibition, 20-21 April, HarrogateInternational CentreTakingas its theme ‘Growing professionally – developing influence’, IOSH’s 2004conference will examine the challenges and opportunities for health and safetyprofessionals as they seek to develop their role and influence in anincreasingly global environment. IOSH’sorganising committee would like to hear from anyone with ideas for potentialtopics, speakers and other contributions to the conference programme.Thecommittee is also calling for papers on issues of contemporary interest inhealth, safety and the environment, including the following:–Disaster planning and recovery–Insurance, compensation and blame–Accident investigation–Noise and vibration –International standards–Globalisation and the supply chain–Best practice in international working–Management systems–Career development and mentoringIfyou wish to be considered as a presenter at the conference, you are invited tosubmit an abstract of your work to Kate Pallett, special events co-ordinator,PR department, IOSH, The Grange, Highfield Drive, Wigston, Leicestershire, LE181NN, UK, or e-mail [email protected] All abstracts must be received by30 June 2003.Theabstract must be typed and include the following information:–Title of paper–Name of author, organisation, city and country–A concise statement of aims, results and conclusionsPresentingauthors will be notified of receipt and notification of acceptance of theabstract submitted will be sent to the author in August.Otherproposals for contributions to the event should also be sent in writing to Kateby 30 June 2003.Anyfurther queries should also be addressed to Kate, 0116 257 3100 (phone) or 0116257 3101 (fax). Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. IOSH 2004 International Conference and ExhibitionOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


What is an expert?

May 12, 2021

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Read full article Related posts:No related photos.center_img What is an expert?Shared from missc on 9 Dec 2014 in Personnel Today During our working lives, almost by default, we look at the long tenured staff members in our organisations with reverence. We see them as professionals to look up to, fountains of knowledge and information, given the years of service. Quite rightly so. In that time, they must have learned a fair amount about the industry in which they operate. But surely having 10, 15, 20 years of experience in an industry doesn’t constitute immediate ‘expert status’?In my opinion, it’s the breadth of experience you have in your chosen skill-set that will differentiate you. Let’s take the recruitment industry for example. Recruitment isn’t the type of industry that has one clear cut way to do things that’s considered “correct” and does not follow a specific formula or set of rules. Success in recruitment will come from tackling a range of recruitment challenges in your career and the way in which you handle them, along with the experience you gain from them. The length of time in an industry can of course ensure a certain depth of knowledge in one or a number of things and in my opinion, I would put a higher value in less depth of knowledge of 10 recruitment challenges learned over 20 years, than 20 years of experience facing one recruitment challenge.It’s the age old “1 year of experience 10 ways, or 10 years of experience 1 way” adage. I believe the most successful recruiters who can legitimately call themselves experts fall into the “1 year of experience 10 ways” group. We operate in an industry where our skill-set is not an exact science. It will be our adaptability and ability to be agile in our approach when grasping the intricacies of any given talent acquisition problem, (whether it’s internal or agency, large enterprise or SME, volume or not etc.) and offering expertise on efficient and effective ways to manage it based on previous experience, that will genuinely ensure the worthiness of the reverence you will receive.last_img read more


Outsourcing giant faces protests over payroll upgrade

May 12, 2021

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first_imgOutsourcing giant faces protests over payroll upgradeBy Jo Faragher on 11 Apr 2019 in Zero hours, Employee communications, Industrial action / strikes, Latest News, Information & consultation, Trade unions, Personnel Today, Payroll, Employment contracts, Sick pay No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Cleaners are among the outsourced staff who have been hit by the payroll change The outsourcing company ISS faces protests today over changes to its payroll system that will see it withhold the pay of thousands of workers. ISS workers include security guards, porters and caterers at a number of prominent private sector employers and NHS hospitals. The payroll upgrade will mean that staff are paid one week later than they are currently. The money owed will be paid to them when they leave the company.Payroll changesCan an employer change the date on which it pays employees?Letter to an employee proposing to change the method of paying him or herThe GMB union has organised a “day of action” today at south London hospitals, while the RMT union has urged action by cleaners working for the company on its Arriva Rail North bus contract.ISS employees at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital and Broadgreen Hospital said they had been informed at the end of March of the changes to the payroll cycle, known by management as ‘Project Greenfield’.Their next new pay date will be 9 May, when they will have worked for three weeks but only been paid for two weeks.One employee said: “To think that ISS has at some point had a meeting and decided to take a week’s pay off low-paid staff and keep it is beyond despicable morally.”Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe, national officer for health at the Unite union, which is also supporting the action, said: “Without proper consultation this multi-billion pound company is withholding the pay of hard-working cleaners and security guards. Many workers who live from pay cheque to pay cheque are struggling to make ends meet and will face genuine hardship as a result.”In a statement, ISS responded: “Currently we operate 15 different pay cycles, which is complex to manage. To prepare us for the transition to the new payroll system, from 9 May we are moving to just one fortnightly pay cycle and one monthly pay cycle.”“A range of loan options are available to suit individual circumstances, with repayment options from eight weeks up to 30 weeks. Local managers are having proactive one-to-one discussions with their employees to ensure that our people receive the financial and emotional support to meet their specific needs. ISS will not withhold any money that is payable to any employee.”The GMB union is also campaigning to get the NHS hospital contractors – many of whom are on zero-hours contracts – the day-one sick pay rights that their salaried colleagues have.Helen O’Connor, GMB regional organiser, called ISS an “exploitative contractor”.She said: “The list of injustices being meted out against ISS workers by their managers appears to be endless and relentless.“ISS has no regard for the wellbeing of its workforce and it is beyond belief that low paid workers can be expected to pay back loans in excess of £300 a month of their own wages so that a multi-million-pound global company like ISS can change their pay cycles.”  Payroll opportunities on Personnel TodayBrowse more payroll jobs Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more