Feeding ecology of the deep-sea lanternshark Etmopterus pusillus (Elasmobranchii: Etmopteridae) in the northeast Atlantic

May 9, 2021

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first_imgThis study provides the first description of the feeding ecology of the smooth lanternshark Etmopterus pusillus based on stomach contents of specimens caught as bycatch in the Algarve (southern Portugal) with bottom trawling and bottom longline. The diet of E. pusillus consists mainly of fish (dry weight (% W)=87.1%; frequency of occurrence (%FO)=28.6%; number (%N)=30.3%), crustaceans (%W=7.7%; %FO=36.7%; %N=3.4%) and cephalopods (%W=4.7%; %FO=11.3%; %N=11.1%). The diet did not vary between sexes. Ontogenic changes were detected: crustaceans decreased in importance as the sharks increased in size and fish became dominant in the diet of adults. Combining two fishing methods provided broad information on the diet of E. pusillus, as bottom trawling caught smaller specimens and longlines caught larger individuals. E. pusillus feeds mainly on non-commercial species, and therefore does not compete directly with commercial fisheries. Finally, E. pusillus feeds in various parts of the water column and thus it can access a wide range of prey; however, this also means that it can be caught by both gears, making it more vulnerable in terms of conservation.last_img read more


Influence of fasting during moult on the faecal microbiota of penguins

May 9, 2021

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first_imgMany seabirds including penguins are adapted to long periods of fasting, particularly during parts of the reproductive cycle and during moult. However, the influence of fasting on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota has not been investigated in seabirds. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the microbial composition and diversity of the GI microbiota of fasting little (Eudyptula minor) and king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) penguins during early and late moult. The results from this study indicated that there was little change in the abundance of the major phyla during moult, except for a significant increase in the level of Proteobacteria in king penguins. In king penguins the abundance of Fusobacteria increases from 1.73% during early moult to 33.6% by late moult, whilst the abundance of Proteobacteria (35.7% to 17.2%) and Bacteroidetes (19.5% to 11%) decrease from early to late moult. In little penguins, a decrease in the abundances of Firmicutes (44% to 29%) and an increase in the abundance of Bacteroidetes (11% to 20%) were observed from early to late moult respectively. The results from this study indicate that the microbial composition of both king and little penguins alters during fasting. However, it appears that the microbial composition of king penguins is more affected by fasting than little penguins with the length of fast the most probable cause for this difference.last_img read more


Reconstructing SALMFamide neuropeptide precursor evolution in the phylum Echinodermata: ophiuroid and crinoid sequence data provide new insights

May 9, 2021

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first_imgThe SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea), and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea) reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here, we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea) and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea). We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus, and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif, and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea) and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea) in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids), which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialized to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the “cocktails” of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms.last_img read more


Region 15 Championship: Day 1

May 8, 2021

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first_imgMay 8, 2018 /Sports News – Local Region 15 Championship: Day 1 Tags: Grand/Manti/North Sanpete/Region 15/Richfield/South Sevier/State Track Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailMANTI, Utah-Tuesday, the Manti Templars hosted the first day of competition of the Region 15 track and field championships.As is customary at all region track and field championship meets, the top four individuals in every event qualify for state.This day of action consists primarily of preliminaries, with a few exceptions.Among these was the girls’ 1600-meter run, which saw Grand’s Kylah Ricks win the title in a time of 5:32.59. Richfield’s Jamie Holt placed third in a time of 5:38.36 to boost the Wildcats in the standings and secure her place at the state championship meet.The boys’ 1600-meter run was won by Richfield’s Hayden Harward in a time of 4:25.81 while Manti’s Jordan Cheney placed third.The boys’ high jump Region 15 title was won by Grand’s Jayden Dowd with a leap of six feet, while North Sanpete’s Jamal Mayoul also qualified, placing fourth overall.The girls’ discus title was wo by another Grand athlete, as Veda Gritts posted a toss of 106-06.50 feet. Richfield’s Carrol Taufatofua also qualified, placing second with a toss of 106 feet.Richfield’s Melissa Crane won the Region 15 girls’ long jump title with a leap of 16-10.50 feet with her teammate Passion Reitz placing second. South Sevier’s Kaylie Jenson also qualified in this event by placing third.The girls’ medley title was won by the Grand Red Devils in a time of 4:26.15. Manti placed second and North Sanpete was third, so the Templars and Hawks both qualified for the state championship meet in this event.The boys’ medley title was won by Manti in a time of 3:40.90, while Richfield placed second, also qualifying. The Templars’ region-winning medley team consists of Cooper Parry, Lance Fowles, Jaden Sterner and Riley Searle. Brad Jameslast_img read more


Managing agents back MPs calling on government to pay for cladding failures

May 7, 2021

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first_imgHome » News » Managing agents back MPs calling on government to pay for cladding failures previous nextRegulation & LawManaging agents back MPs calling on government to pay for cladding failuresARMA says housing committee’s response to draft Building Safety Bill – including call for Ministers to bankroll tower upgrades – is right.Nigel Lewis27th November 20201 Comment357 Views Managing agents have backed a parliamentary committee’s call for the government to pay for remedial work to residential towers with cladding defects, rather than leaseholders.The Association of Residential Managing Agents (ARMA) says the report, published this week by the committee of MPs which scrutinises the ministry of housing, mirrors its advice that forcing leaseholders to finance the replacement or upgrade of cladding on residential towers is unfair.The comments refer to the draft Building Safety Bill, a controversial piece legislation which will attempt to fix the flaws in the UK’s building safety regime highlighted by the Grenfell tragedy.As the leading trade association for residential leasehold management, ARMA is calling for further clarity around the bill’s legislation and regulation, particularly the roles and responsibilities of key professions in the construction and building management sectors.These include the new titles of ‘accountable person’ and ‘building safety manager’, which will form vital parts of the new regime.ARMA welcomes the report’s suggestion of subjecting those in these roles to national accreditation and registration standards.Nigel Glen (pictured), CEO of ARMA, who gave evidence to MPs during the draft Bill’s pre-legislative scrutiny, says: “The feedback is encouraging and certainly a step in the right direction towards alleviating residents’ fears over crippling remediation costs.“Whilst historic defects are not the responsibilities of leaseholders to pay, there is an obvious shortfall of money in the current building safety fund. We urge the government to find a way to bridge this gap.MP Clive Betts (left), who heads up the committee scrutinishing the Bill, says: “The Government must bring an end to the ongoing uncertainty around who will pay the cost for the historic failures in the building safety regime. Leaseholders should not be expected to foot the bill for failures that were not of their making.” Grenfell Tower Nigel Glen ARMA Clive Betts November 27, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentPossession Friend, Possession Friend Possession Friend 27th November 2020 at 8:28 pmIts Not the Tax-payers responsibility to pay to put right bad, unsafe cladding work that the building owner commissioned. !Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more


HMS Argyll Snatches £10 Mln Worth of Cocaine

May 4, 2021

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first_img Authorities View post tag: americas Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Argyll Snatches £10 Mln Worth of Cocaine View post tag: worth View post tag: News by topic October 29, 2014 View post tag: Naval Share this article A Royal Navy warship has seized cocaine with a wholesale value of £10 million from a yacht in the Caribbean.Just 24 hours after helping in the aftermath of Hurricane Gonzalo in Bermuda, the Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll’s Lynx helicopter spotted the yacht in the Atlantic.A search by the US Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment, working from HMS Argyll, uncovered 10 bales of cocaine which was confiscated before the 2 crew members were taken into custody.Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said:This is yet another clear demonstration of the flexibility and versatility of the Royal Navy. HMS Argyll and her crew are playing a key role in disrupting the drugs trade which blights the UK.The British people should be proud of the work that they undertake on our behalf.This is HMS Argyll’s second bust in 2 months having seized £21 million of cocaine in August.The ship is operating as part of a 15-nation collaboration to stop criminal organisations getting access to regions of Central America, with a focus on the illegal movement of drugs from South America to the western world.Able Seaman Specialist Alex Hartley said:Life on board is hectic at the moment, I was involved in working ashore to help the locals in Bermuda after Hurricane Gonzalo and the next day I drove one of our boats out to intercept a yacht with drugs on it.This is just typical of our deployment to be honest, life is challenging but rewarding onboard HMS Argyll right now.[mappress mapid=”14243″]Press release, Image: UK Navy View post tag: UK View post tag: HMS Argyllcenter_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Royal Navy View post tag: Mln View post tag: Cocaine View post tag: 10 View post tag: Caribbean View post tag: europe View post tag: Snatches HMS Argyll Snatches £10 Mln Worth of Cocainelast_img read more


Concert For Fallen Music Fan To Take Place Featuring Members Of Cornmeal & More

March 2, 2021

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first_imgAbout a year ago, passionate music lover Kelsey Fourdyce from Edwardsville, IL lost her life in a mysterious series of events at age 31. While her family and friends continue to mourn the tragic loss, a concert is being organized in her honor to celebrate her life and raise money for her memorial scholarship, which has been set up to help underprivileged students study abroad. The lineup will feature a dance party provided by Grood, spearheaded by Kelsey’s college friend Charlie Otto and featuring members of Cornmeal, Indigo Sun, Melk, Nasty Snacks, Woo Park, Bonzo Terks, and JJ and Dre, plus Marcus Rezak, Jared Rabin, and additional special guests TBA. “Concert for Kelsey” will take place at Chicago’s Lincoln Hall on Sunday, 8/7 and tickets are available here.Kelsey, a graduate of the University of Illinois, was found dead at the Great Star Theater in San Francisco’s Chinatown on May 10th, 2015. You can read more about the strange circumstances surrounding her passing here, or watch the video below for more info.In addition to the music, a series of fun prizes will be auctioned off, including concert tickets, Cubs tickets, Grassroots California merchandise and more.Concert organizers are seeking to raise funding to help cover production costs, staffing, musicians, and venue costs to ultimately be able to generate more money for Kelsey’s cause. If you wish to contribute, head over to the GoFundMe page.last_img read more


Men’s soccer pushes past Penn

March 1, 2021

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first_img Passing through Andre Akpan ’10 moves swiftly down the field toward a Penn defender. The impenetrable wall A diving Austin Harms ’12 makes one of two key saves on the day, earning his sixth shutout of the year in Harvard’s 1-0 victory over Penn. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Needing one win to claim the Ancient Eight crown and an automatic NCAA playoff berth, freshman defender Richard Smith came up big for the Harvard men’s soccer team against Penn on Nov. 15, netting the game’s only goal in the 68th minute to put the Crimson up, 1-0.From there, tight defensive play for Harvard was enough to hold off the Quakers, as the Crimson clinched their first Ivy League championship since 2006 (13th overall) and finished the regular season with the team’s best record in more than a decade. Quality control Crimson midfielder Robert Millock ’11 controls the ball in front of a Penn player. Running toward the rock In a mad dash for the ball, Harvard midfielder Desmond Mitchell ’10 is too fast for his Penn counterpart. The victors Erupting in cheers, the Harvard men’s soccer team celebrates a hard-earned Ivy League Championship. Harvard vs. Penn Put it on the board Two-time Ivy Rookie of the Week Brian Rogers ’13 celebrates after teammate Richard Smith ’13 scores the game’s only goal. Making necessary headway Crimson midfielder Adam Rousmaniere ’10 tries to put a head on the ball while fending off a defender. Bringing ‘Ivy’ back to Cambridge Baba Omosegbon ’12 (left) and Andre Akpan ’10 share a joyful moment at game’s end. Flight 006 clearing for takeoff Baba Omosegbon ’12 leaps over a fallen Penn player in pursuit of the ball. Sophomore goalkeeper Austin Harms made two saves in posting his sixth shutout of the season. Smith’s game-winning tally was his first career goal, and earned him Ivy League Rookie of the Week honors.The Crimson finished the regular season ranked 11th nationally with a record of 13-3-1 (5-1-1 Ivy League). Harvard, who has a first round bye in the NCAA tournament, will host the winner of Friday’s (Nov. 20) Monmouth or Connecticut match. Game time is set for Sunday (Nov. 22, 1 p.m.) at Ohiri Field.last_img read more


Harvard names new executive director of i-lab

March 1, 2021

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first_img Read Full Story Matt Segneri will become the Bruce and Bridgitt Evans Executive Director of the Harvard Innovation Labs (i-lab), a university-wide entity that fosters team-based and entrepreneurial activities and provides a forum for interactions among students, faculty, alumni, and the surrounding community.A first-generation college student and graduate of both Harvard College and Harvard Business School (HBS), Segneri has been the director of the HBS Social Enterprise Initiative for the past five years. During that time, he served as co-lead of the HBS New Venture Competition; as an MBA Ombudsperson; and as a judge for and advisor to the President’s Innovation Challenge, MassChallenge, and the MIT $100K Competition. Segneri also was instrumental in developing the proposal that established the Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative, a collaborative effort across the Harvard Business School and Harvard Kennedy School and an innovative example of entrepreneurship within academia.He received the Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 and the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce Ten Outstanding Young Leaders Awards. Segneri held previous leadership roles in organizations of different sizes and phases of development, including the City of Boston Mayor’s Office, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and the Monitor Group.“The i-lab has been an extraordinary success, and as we gain new neighbors in Allston — beginning with the Science and Engineering Complex next fall — it’s thrilling to imagine an even greater future,” said Nitin Nohria, Dean of Harvard Business School and director of the i-lab Advisory Board. “Matt’s passion for innovation and entrepreneurship, his strong ties to the student and alumni communities, and his proven record of excellence make him an outstanding choice for this role.”Harvard University Provost Alan M. Garber, added, “Matt’s deep understanding of undergraduate and graduate education, along with his demonstrated commitment to mentoring and helping educate the next generation of student entrepreneurs, makes him the right person to guide the i-lab in this next chapter.”Since its launch in 2011, more than 38,000 students from all 12 Harvard University schools have experienced the i-lab, 1,600 ventures have been incubated, and $2.7 million has been distributed in non-dilutive funding.Segneri said he looks forward to building on the success of his predecessors, Gordon Jones and Jodi Goldstein, while exploring new opportunities and meeting new needs. “I believe that problems are solved at the intersection of ideas and disciplines. It is pure magic when you bring together people from across the University to think differently and build new things. The i-lab truly is One Harvard at its best,” he said. “This is a very exciting moment in time and a way to be in service to these student entrepreneurs, the University, and the city that I love.”last_img read more


Snow White and the darkness within us

March 1, 2021

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first_imgGAZETTE: Can you explain the connection between Snow White’s skin color and her innocence and goodness?TATAR: The red, white, and black color coding in many European versions of this story reminds me of how the Grimms believed that those were the colors of poetry. Their beautiful girl is “white as snow, red as blood, and black as the wood on this window frame.” It was Disney who changed that to “lips red as the rose, hair black as ebony, and skin white as snow.” When you look at other versions of the story, you realize that, generally, the daughter’s skin color is not an issue, though, curiously, there is a Samoan version of the tale with a girl with albinism who is an outcast. The fact that the beautiful girl in a global repertoire of stories about mothers and daughters is stereotyped as having skin white as snow because of the influence of the Grimm and Disney versions limits the global cultural resonance of the story. There’s nothing sacred about the Grimms’ version of that fairy tale or about Disney’s reimagining of it, but we tend to think of Grimm and Disney as the “originals,” and, unfortunately, they have become the “authoritative” versions.GAZETTE: What are some of the themes or morals that you found across the tales you collected for this volume?TATAR: Tales about beautiful girls circulated in adult storytelling cultures, in communal settings. They gave parents a way to talk about, think about, and address their own complicated feelings and unacknowledged resentment about raising children only to have them grow up and exceed you in one way or another. Myths and fairy tales enact all the fantasies, fears, anxieties, and terrors stored up in our imaginations that we are ordinarily afraid to talk about. By amplifying and exaggerating real-life conflicts, folktales animated our ancestors, getting them to sit up, listen, and think. In the safe space of “once upon a time,” they could explore taboo subjects and talk about the dark side of human nature. They are the symbolic stories that help us talk about and navigate the real. That’s why a psychologist like Bruno Bettelheim saw in the telling of the stories a form of therapeutic value.But there is more to these stories than cathartic release. Fairy tales are also a great contact zone for all generations, enabling us to think more and think harder about crisis, resources, and recovery in a whole range of situations: famine, expulsion, abduction, loss, dispossession, enslavement, and so on, all the terrible things that can happen to us.A 1923 illustration of Snow White and the hunter by Gustaf Tenggren.GAZETTE: Were there any versions of the story that surprised you in their approach?TATAR: I think that almost every version of Snow White surprised me in one way or another. There’s a Swiss story called “The Death of the Seven Dwarves” in which you have all the tropes of the Snow White story, but scrambled up. A homeless child finds protection with seven dwarves, and an old woman comes knocking on the door, seeking a bed for herself as well. When the girl refuses to offer shelter, the old woman denounces her as a slut and accuses her of sleeping with all seven of the dwarves. This is pretty heady stuff, and that tale made it clear to me that these stories were never really for children. They were meant to entertain adults while they were spinning, sewing, repairing tools, and doing chores late at night. John Updike tells us that fairy tales were the television and pornography of an earlier age, and a story like that is revelatory about the true uses of enchantment.GAZETTE: You say that fairy tales are larger than life and can reflect and magnify our fears and anxieties. What do you think fairy tales can provide during this time of uncertainty and fear during the COVID-19 pandemic?TATAR: One of my favorite fairy tales, “Hansel and Gretel,” starts in a time of famine. How do you manage to stay alive when your parents throw you out? The philosopher Walter Benjamin put it beautifully when he said that fairy tales transmit one big lesson: You need wits and courage to confront the monsters out in the woods.There’s no practical advice or wisdom to be drawn from the lore of times past. But our ancestors did use these stories to talk with each other about the tools you need to survive, and what is often modeled in fairy tales is an instinct for compassion and collaboration. I think here of all those grateful animals that are not slaughtered and then turn up to help carry out an otherwise impossible task. In the time of a pandemic, something global that affects all of us, the golden network of storytelling reminds us of everything we share, that we are all human, and that solidarity and caring for each other build a path forward to developing the tools and knowledge we need for healing.Interview was edited for clarity and length. Walt Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” was released as the first feature-length animated film in 1937, and decades later, the musical fantasy based on a Grimm Brothers fairy tale about the complications and conflicts in the mother-daughter relationship is still a cultural touchstone. The story has virtually eclipsed every version of the many told the world over about beautiful girls and their older rivals, often a cruel biological mother or stepmother, but sometimes an aunt or a mother-in-law. In her new book, “The Fairest of Them All: Snow White and 21 Tales of Mothers and Daughters,” Maria Tatar, the John L. Loeb Research Professor of Folklore and Mythology and Germanic Languages and Literatures and a senior fellow in Harvard’s Society of Fellows, collected tales from a variety of nations, including Egypt, Japan, Switzerland, Armenia, and India. She spoke to the Gazette about her lifelong fascination with the saga and how we can look to fairy tales to navigate uncertain times.Q&AMaria TatarGAZETTE: Why did you decide to take up the Snow White story?TATAR: While working on my previous book with Henry Louis “Skip” Gates Jr., “The Annotated African American Folktales,” I came across a South African story called “The Unnatural Mother and the Girl with a Star on Her Forehead.” It was basically what we call the Snow White story, but in it the “beautiful girl” falls into a catatonic trance after putting on slippers given to her by her jealous mother. That’s when I fell down the rabbit hole of wonder tales and discovered stories from all over the world in which a stunningly attractive young woman arouses the jealousy of a woman who is usually her biological mother. The Brothers Grimm, whose 1812 story inspired Walt Disney to create the animated film, had many vernacular tales available to them, but they chose to publish the one in which the rival is the stepmother, in part because they did not want to violate the sanctity of motherhood. Now, decades later, it is still our cultural story about the many complications and conflicts in the mother-daughter relationship. It has eradicated almost every trace of the many tales told all over the world about beautiful girls and their rivals.GAZETTE: Why does this particular story remain so resonant?TATAR: All of the tales in this collection are cliffhangers. They begin with the counterfactual “What if?” then leave us asking “What’s next?” and finally challenge us to ask “Why?” These stories were originally told in communal settings, and they got people talking about all the conflicts, pressures, and injustices in real life. How do you create an ending that is not just happily ever after, but also “the fairest of them all”? What do you do when faced with worst-case possible scenarios? What do you need to survive cruelty, abandonment, and assault? In fairy tales, the answer often comes in the form of wits, intelligence, and resourcefulness on the one hand, and courage on the other. With their melodramatic mysteries, they arouse our curiosity and make us care about the characters. They tell us something about the value of seeking knowledge and feeling compassion under the worst of circumstances, and that’s a lesson that makes us pay attention today. “All of the tales in this collection are cliffhangers. They begin with the counterfactual ‘What if?’ then leave us asking ‘What’s next?’ and finally challenge us to ask ‘Why?’” Related Fairy tales for all Gates and Tatar discuss origins, ambition of annotated volume African-American folklore inspires meeting of the mindscenter_img Harvard experts explain attraction, meaning of the beckoning genre Tatar examines ‘simple expressions of complex thought’ Oh, the horror! The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more