Department Head, Electrical Engineering

May 3, 2021

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first_imgAdditionally, candidates will need to include names, titles, andemail addresses of five (5) references who will be requested towrite confidential letters of recommendation.Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2019 and continueuntil the position is filled.The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga is the second largestschool in the University of Tennessee System, serving a diversestudent body of more than 11,000 undergraduate and graduatestudents through five academic colleges. UTC offers a unique blendof private and public school traditions and is a driving force forachieving excellence, embracing diversity, inspiring positivechange, and enriching the community. Since its founding asChattanooga University in 1886, UTC has developed a reputation forexcellence built on an unusual blend of the private and publictraditions of American higher education. For more than 83 years,the university was a private school. In 1969, UTC became part ofthe state university system. Today, UTC is on a journey toexcellence – boldly embracing a passion for excellence in allthings and focused on changing lives and transformingcommunities.Chattanooga, the fourth largest city in the state, is located inSoutheast Tennessee near the border of Georgia at the junction ofseveral interstate highways. The city has received nationalrecognition for the renaissance of its beautiful downtown andredevelopment of its riverfront. Chattanooga also has the fastestinternet in the country. Home to the first Gig Internet in theUnited States, Chattanooga has a 100% fiber network that linksevery home and business in a 600-square mile area. Companies likeUnum, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee, McKee, U.S. Xpress,Volkswagen, Coca-Cola United, and Amazon have chosen to set up shopin Chattanooga. Attractions such as the Tennessee Aquarium, LookoutMountain, Civil War battlefield sites, the African American Museum,and the Appalachian Trail bring thousands of people to the area, asdo events like the Riverbend Festival, Nightfall, Jazzanooga, theCreative Discovery Museum for Children, and the Southern WritersConference. Chattanooga is the home to the seven-time NCAA SouthernConference Football Champions, The University of Tennessee atChattanooga Mocs. People who love the outdoors use Chattanooga as abase for hang-gliding, bass fishing, mountain climbing and cavingexpeditions; the beautiful Smoky Mountains and Tennessee Riversupport the greatest variety of flora of any area in the UnitedStates. Chattanooga also has a long and rich past with regard todiversity, which includes Native American heritage, Civil Warhistory, and the Civil Rights movement. Chattanooga is also just atwo hour (or less) drive from Atlanta, Nashville, Knoxville,Huntsville, and Birmingham.The University of Tennessee Chattanooga is an EEO/AA/TitleVI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA/ADEA institution. All qualifiedapplicants will receive equal consideration for employment and willnot be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, nationalorigin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexualorientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability,or protected veteran status. Ph.D. Degree in Electrical Engineering or a closely relatedfield;Demonstrated strong peer-reviewed grant development experience,high quality research, and scholarship supported by federal, state,and/or industry funding;Demonstrated excellence in undergraduate and graduateteaching;Proven leadership experience and commitment to inclusion anddiversity;Demonstrated experience with ABET and regional accreditation;andExcellent communication and interpersonal skills. The Department of Electrical Engineering at the University ofTennessee at Chattanooga College of Engineering and ComputerScience invites applications for the Department Head position withthe successful applicant starting on August 1, 2020.Qualifications :Successful candidates must have the following requirements: Cover letterCVUnofficial transcriptsTeaching statementResearch statementAdministrative Philosophy statement The Department of Electrical Engineering offers degrees at BS andMS levels, serves over 170 majors and graduates approximately 35students per year. The department consists of eight full-timefaculty members with expertise in cross-cutting disciplines ofpower systems, microelectronics, robotics and controls, spacesystems, internet-of-things, communications, sustainability andrenewable energy. The faculty conduct research funded by theNational Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and variouscommercial industries. The college also offers a PhD degree inComputational Science (Computational Engineering concentration)with a focus in Electrical Engineering. The program and activitiesof the department—along with collaborations with the UTC Center ofExcellence in Applied Computational Science and Engineering, theUTC Center for Urban Informatics and Progress, Tennessee ValleyAuthority (TVA), Electric Power Board (EPB), and Oak Ridge NationalLaboratory as well as strong community and industry support—presenta unique opportunity for the successful candidate to have greaterregional and national impact.Responsibilities of the Department Head include, but are notlimited to: being a strong advocate for the department; promotingand supporting teaching, research and scholarly activities, as wellas professional service activities; ensuring alignment of thelong-term vision and goals of the department with the ones for thecollege and the university; formulation of a strategic plan forequity, inclusion, and diversity; advancing community engagement;development of initiatives that ensure student success; teachingassignments; and providing sound programmatic, operational, andfinancial stewardship for the department.Application Procedures:Applications must be submitted electronically through theUTC Faculty Career Site by visiting:last_img read more


Oxford Chancellor criticises campaigns to remove Rhodes statue as ‘hypocrisy’

May 3, 2021

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first_imgHe also invoked his own role as the last colonial governor, saying he had acknowledged that Britain had acquired Hong Kong in  “appalling circumstances”, but that “we did some good things in Hong Kong.” He said that Nelson Mandela had supported the Rhodes Trust, setting up the Mandela Rhodes Foundation to help heal the divisions and using the South African Constitution to underline his point. Lord Patten described how Mandela looked at a picture of Rhodes when setting this up and said: “Cecil, you and I are going to have to work together.” Lord Patten spoke today on the Radio 4 Today programme about protests over the Cecil Rhodes statue and Oxford’s colonial history. He stated that “in almost every aspect of history, you have to look at both sides, and normally there are more than two sides.” Lord Patten spoke in light of the peaceful protest yesterday to remove the statue of Cecil Rhodes on the Oriel College building facing the High Street and the resurgence of the Rhodes Must Fall Oxford campaign. Image credit to James Yuanxin Li/ Wikimedia Commons. Lord Patten pointed out that the decision to remove the statue can only be taken by Oriel College and disputed claims that the refusal to do so in 2016 was influenced by alumni’s threats to withdraw millions in donations. Nick Robinson, Radio 4 presenter, asked Patten whether he was too dismissive a few years ago, because “a young generation of black and ethnic minority people are offended by these symbols.” When asked whether Oxford should follow Cambridge in setting up an inquiry into how the institution benefits from slavery and colonial wealth, he referred to the guided tours by “young undergraduates” which take visitors around the city explaining places which show the history “people don’t approve of”.center_img “There are incredibly complicated issues and we actually have to have a sensible discussion, and I am pleased that it is turning into a discussion.” Oxford University Chancellor, Lord Chris Patten, has labelled calls to “throw the Rhodes statue in the Thames” as “hypocrisy”, because the Rhodes Trust funds 100 scholars each year, “a fifth of them from Africa”. He acknowledged the problems Oxford has with racism and discrimination, explaining that it partially stems from the fact that “so few students of colour who are getting the requisite numbers of As at A-Level.” The Chancellor said, therefore: “If it was alright withMandela, then I have to say it’s pretty well alright for me.” Patten said this should be taken seriously in a “proper engaged argument”, which involves “far more fundamental issues… like education, like public housing, like public health.” These are the ‘Uncomfortable Oxford’ tours, an independent organisation run by students across the university. last_img read more


In Short

April 21, 2021

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first_img== Hardakers robbery == == Free training offer == == Pearsons publicity == A robber armed with what appeared to be a handgun burst into Hardakers bakery in Horsforth, West Yorkshire, last month and threatened staff before fleeing with cash. == Marmite pasties == == 7Up promotion ==center_img Pearsons of Ingleton from North Yorkshire claimed the runner-up prize in California Raisins’ 2009 Innovation Competition for its free-range pork pies, made using California Raisins. Pearsons will receive advertising and publicity for its products, courtesy of California Raisins. Warrens Bakery has launched two new pasties containing Marmite. The Marmite & Steak and Marmite & Cheese Pasty have been developed in partnership with Unilever Food Solutions, and will be available in Warrens’ 56 bakeries in the south west of England. Food consultant Nellie Nichols is offering the chance to win five free days of training to launch her new Food on the Move Academy. Nichols, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the recent British Sandwich Awards, consults on new product development, training and sourcing. To be in with a chance, email [email protected] with a brief description of your business objectives and the reasons why you believe you should win. Britvic and Pepsico have launched an on-pack promotion across the 7Up soft drinks range. Consumers can get £10 off their next holiday with Thomas Cook with every purchase, as well as the chance to win a holiday to one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The promotion will run from 15 June to 31 October across all 7Up bottles and cans.last_img read more


Thai firm snaps up UK’s Intelipac

April 20, 2021

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first_imgThai packaging company TPBI is to enter the paper packaging market for the first time after inking a deal to acquire stakes in UK firm Intelipac – the business that resurrected bakery packaging supplier Reynards last year.The move was in response to “strong demand in south-east Asia and Australia” for eco-friendly paper and packaging products, a TPBI spokesman told British Baker.The new signings, which include the former Reynards business, will enable the Bangkok-based company to offer paper packaging alongside its reusable plastic products, including bags for life, food and liquid pouches.Reynards entered administration in 2017, but was rescued by Stoke-on-Trent-based Intelipac, a supplier of bakery and deli bags, carrier bags and corrugated cardboard boxes to retailers in the UK and Australia.TPBI said it expected the new acquisitions would enable it to start earning fresh revenue – Thai Baht 1 billion (£233.3k) per year – as early as Q4 2018 and achieve its FY2018 growth target.“The acquisitions have transformed us into a world-class producer and supplier of packaging products from a variety of materials, and they have equipped us with the channels for distribution of reusable plastic bags in new markets. We are also looking to increase the variety further to reflect demand in European and Australian markets,” said Somsak Borrisuttanakul, TPBI chief executive.Kamol Borrisuttanakul, TPBI’s chief financial officer, noted that the company had obtained a paper packaging production plant with a capacity of two million units per day in the UK, as well as management teams with “extensive experience and understanding of the European and Australian market environment and demand”.In April 2017, Intelipac acquired the name, goodwill and certain assets of Reynards, a supplier of bakery goods including foil trays, paper cases and films for more than 45 years.last_img read more


Firefly Festival Announces 2019 Lineup With Panic! At The Disco, Travis Scott, Post Malone, & More

March 2, 2021

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first_imgFirefly Music Festival has announced its return to The Woodlands in Dover, Delaware for its eighth year on June 21st–23rd, 2019. The multi-day event has grown into one of the premier camping music festivals along the eastern U.S. since beginning back in 2012. Along with a smattering of rock and indie acts, Firefly boasts a diverse, hip-hop- and electronic-heavy lineup for next summer, with scheduled headlining performances from Panic! At The Disco on night one, Travis Scott on Saturday, and Post Malone to close the event on Sunday.The festival’s 2019 lineup poster appears to be aimed towards a slightly younger audience who would be much more inclined to embrace such a strong presence of rap and EDM. More top-level names scheduled to perform at Firefly next year also include Tyler, The Creator, Zedd, Kygo, Louis The Child, GRiZ, DJ Snake, Brockhampton, and Alison Wonderland. Rock fans should at least be happy to see names like Death Cab For Cutie, Vampire Weekend, Courtney Barnett, X Ambassadors, and Dashboard Confessional towards the top of the daily lineups, although the number of guitar-playing artists is certainly dwarfed by ones who solely rely on a computer and external hard drive to perform. Fans should also make a note of some of the mid-tier artists found on next year’s lineup, including Tank and the Bangas, Yoke Lore, Rubblebucket, and KNOWER.Firefly Music Festival 2019 Lineup Announcement Video[Video: Firefly]Over this past summer, it was announced that AEG Presents would purchase the remaining ownership of the event from original producers, Red Frog Events. The full acquisition of Firefly adds to corporate promoter’s growing arsenal of festivals ranging from Coachella to New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. The new ownership would explain some of the noticeable changes to Firefly’s 2019 format, starting with the festival shrinking in length from its usual four days down to three. Another big takeaway would, of course, be the dominance of hip-hop and electronic music throughout the lineup. The overall artist programming for 2019 isn’t necessarily weak, but does come as a surprise from a festival which that booked Arctic Monkeys, Muse, Kings Of Leon, and even Paul McCartney in recent years.All ticket options will be going on sale starting this Friday, December 14th at 12 p.m. EST at the official event website.last_img read more


Inspired to serve, and lead

March 1, 2021

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first_imgIt was a memorable day for James Clarke ’16, who departed Tercentenary Theatre as a 2nd lieutenant in the Army.And it was memorable for Clarke’s parents, Lt. Col. John Paul Clarke, who graduated from Harvard College in 1967, and Kendra Warren, a 1993 Harvard Kennedy School graduate who worked for the Defense Department as a civilian.Before the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) commissioning ceremony on Wednesday, Clarke’s parents and his brother, Kenneth Russell, an infantry officer who just returned from Afghanistan, surrounded him to share their pride and joy. On the steps of Memorial Church, Clarke was beaming.“I get to graduate from Harvard, which is in itself a great honor, and I get to go into the Army to serve my country, which is again a great honor,” said Clarke, a native of Chesterfield, Va. “And perhaps, the best for me is to follow my family tradition of service to the country.”Clarke was among 12 seniors honored at the ceremony. It was the largest crop of commissioned officers at Harvard since 2010, President Drew Faust said in her remarks.“This is a historic time, one that reminds us of proud traditions these young officers will carry forward into a new era as they join the long Crimson line,” said Faust, as she saluted the new officers. “With your commissioning today, you join an exceptional company, a fellowship unlike any other at this University or elsewhere.”Importance of military service <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hO-n8e2dwM” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/4hO-n8e2dwM/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Congressman Seth Moulton ’01, a former Marine who served four tours in Iraq, earning dual master’s degrees from the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Business School between tours, talks about the importance of service and the impact his military training had on his career. Faust, who over the past five years has spearheaded the return of ROTC to Harvard, noted that only a few weeks ago the University welcomed Air Force ROTC back to campus. In the 1970s, wide protests against the Vietnam War led the University to end military training on campus, a decision that held for nearly 40 years. In 2011, after Congress repealed the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” ban on gay and lesbian service members, Harvard moved to bring back ROTC.“Just this week we have seen powerful evidence of how that repeal has not only strengthened Harvard’s ties to the military, but it has strengthened the armed forces more generally,” said Faust. “Throughout our history, the military and the nation have grown stronger together as they have become more inclusive — of blacks, of women, of gays and lesbians.”Joining Clarke as Army 2nd lieutenants were Charley Falletta, a government and economics concentrator who will attend the Armor Basic Officer Leaders Course at Fort Bennington, Ga., and Lucy Perkins, who is graduating with a master’s in urban planning from the Graduate School of Design. Perkins will attend the Military Intelligence Basic Officer Leaders Course in Fort Huachuca, Ariz., before joining the 450th Civil Affairs Battalion at Fort Meade, Maryland.,Midshipmen Marines were Carolyn Pushaw, with a degree in evolutionary biology; Francis Girard Davis (human development and regenerative biology); Robert Solmssen, (history concentrator); and Steven Wessman (economics concentrator). They will attend the Basic School in Quantico, Va.New Navy ensigns were Jimmy Castaño (physics concentrator); Adam Jorge Gracia (engineering concentrator); and Anne McCue Nonnamaker (organismic and evolutionary biology). The three will move next to the Naval Nuclear Power School in Charleston, S.C.Zander Farrow, a government and economics concentrator with a focus on counterterrorism, was commissioned as a cadet in the Air Force. His first assignment is pilot training at Randolph Air Force Base in San Antonio.As for Clarke, a government concentrator, he will attend the Quartermaster Basic Officer Leaders Course at Fort Lee, Va., before going to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, where he’ll join the 3rd Brigade Combat Team of the 101st Airborne Division.He said he’s looking forward to a life of commitment, service, and learning.“I want to learn, give back, and help people out,” he said.last_img read more


Physics, real and fictional

March 1, 2021

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first_imgThe findings, Ullman said, showed wide agreement across nearly all participants that certain spells, like conjuring a frog, making it cease to exist, or transforming it into a mouse, would require more effort than others, like levitating a frog or changing its color.To understand whether those rankings were influenced by books, films, or even video games, Ullman and McCoy asked participants how much exposure they had to fictional worlds like those found in the “Harry Potter” books or “Star Wars” films, and the results suggested the influence was minimal.“We did try to control for that,” Ullman said. “There was no effect any way you slice it. We had people who had a lot of exposure and with very little exposure, and it didn’t matter in the slightest in these rankings. I don’t think that’s a knockdown argument against cultural differences — it’s difficult these days to find someone who hasn’t read ‘Harry Potter’ — but I think the next step is to run these experiments cross-culturally.”The team performed two other tests, one in which volunteers were asked about the same spells, but on a much larger target — a cow rather than a frog. Just as they had in the first experiment, people showed wide agreement on which spells would be hardest to perform.To reinforce those findings, Ullman and McCoy later replicated the first experiment using a much larger pool of volunteers, with similar results.“For us, the interesting thing is that these are two different groups of subjects who had no idea about each other, but people overall agreed with one another,” Ullman said. “That suggests there is some internal parameter, some intuitive theory of physics where we understand that to levitate a cow, we need to enact some force against its weight, and it will take more for heavier than for lighter things.“That seems obvious, but I think what’s interesting is to explore why it’s obvious,” Ullman added. “There is something that’s making that decision … I would suggest that one thing they’re drawing on is their intuitive understanding of physics. The understanding that allows you to get by in the real world all the time, is the same thing you’re querying in this fictional scenario.”Perhaps even more tellingly, Ullman said, the rankings also seem to align with decades of research that showed that young children — in some cases as young as 4 months old — already possess some hierarchy when it comes to that sense of intuitive physics.“Children are surprised when there is a violation of their intuitive physics, but certain things seem to come online earlier than others,” Ullman said. “So very early on, violations of solidity and permanence are very surprising to them. They understand things shouldn’t just disappear or appear. But other things, like shape changes or color changes, they don’t care about very much until older ages.”Ultimately, Ullman believes that understanding how those intuitive senses work and where they come from could help shed new light on how the brain itself works.“If we take seriously the central metaphor of cognitive science, that the mind is something like a computer and it’s running some programs, what I’m particularly interested in is, what’s the program for intuitive psychology and intuitive physics, and how did we learn those programs?” Ullman said. “I’m putting my chips on the idea that a central part of those programs has been there from birth, and I think that makes sense both empirically based on what we see in other studies, and it makes sense from an engineering point of view. If you were going to program a video game, you wouldn’t want to write all the code from scratch, you would import a bunch of the basics that people have already created.“Now a child, you can imagine they would need some of those general programs, so you can say, ‘I don’t know what you’re going to encounter, I don’t know what they’ll be shaped like, but I do know they’ll have goals and intentions, and they won’t be able to pass through each other,’” he continued. “Those things would be true if you were born on Earth, but they would be true if you were born on Alpha Centauri. They would be true if you were born in the ‘Star Wars’ universe, so I think when we consider imaginary worlds, we’re really considering the limits of that program. It can describe our world, but it can also describe all these fictional worlds as well.”This research was supported with funding from the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines. Harvard-MIT research may provide data to improve computational models for artificial intelligence and machine learning The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. By studying African population, researchers discover genetic variations based on latitude Relatedcenter_img Skin pigmentation is far more complex than thought Babies understand cost-reward tradeoffs behind others’ actions, study says It’s not something most Harvard faculty spend much time contemplating, but Tomer Ullman likes to think about magic.In particular, he likes to think about whether it would be harder to levitate a frog or turn it to stone. And if you’re thinking the answer is obvious (turning it to stone, right?), Ullman says that’s the point.The reason the answer seems clear, the assistant professor of psychology said, has to do with what researchers call “intuitive physics” — our built-in sense of how the physical world operates. Even young children, he said, understand that there are certain “rules” to the world. Gravity makes things fall, for instance. Large objects weigh more than small ones, and solid objects can’t pass through each other.But Ullman and co-author John McCoy, assistant professor of marketing at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, said in a study published in PLOS ONE that intuitive sense not only underpins our understanding of the “real” world but also informs the fictional ones we create.“We are interested in the structure of the imagination,” Ullman said. “What’s interesting is that, while we exist in a world that has a particular set of rules that we understand, even if we are not scientists … yet we’re capable of conceiving of many different, alternate worlds that deviate from the real world.”That intuitive understanding, Ullman said, isn’t limited to physics. It’s probably how we make sense of most of the world around us.,Thanks to a sense of intuitive psychology, he said, we recognize that other people have intentions and goals and take actions to fulfill them, despite the fact that we can’t read their thoughts.“And the interesting thing about these intuitive theories is they can explain the world as it is, but they can also explain these other worlds,” Ullman said. “So even though a fictional character might look very different from us, and they might have very different goals than us … we can still understand them as having goals and beliefs that they are working to reach.”But even in those fictional worlds, Ullman said, there are limits.“We tend to think of imaginary worlds that are closer to our own world,” he said. “So in the ‘Harry Potter’ books, gravity still exists, and J.K. Rowling doesn’t need to tell us, at the beginning of the story, that it still exists. Basically, when we build the canvas of this imaginary world, we import some things from our world, so while there are some things, like the fact that people can perform magic, that have changed, there are other things that we assume.”To understand how ubiquitous that intuitive understanding is, and how it gets uploaded into fictional worlds, Ullman and McCoy devised an unorthodox experiment: Assuming magic exists, volunteers were asked to rank spells — everything from conjuring a frog from thin air to transforming it into a mouse to changing its color — according to their difficulty. “We are interested in the structure of the imagination. … [W]hile we exist in a world that has a particular set of rules that we understand, even if we are not scientists … we’re capable of conceiving of many different, alternate worlds that deviate from the real world.” — Tomer Ullmanlast_img read more


Community mourns 9/11 during prayer service in the era of COVID-19

January 26, 2021

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first_imgMaggie Klaers | The Observer The Notre Dame community gathered at 8:46 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Grotto for an annual prayer service to honor those affected by 9/11. The event was scheduled to start 12 hours after the first tower was struck.In a similar way manner, students and community members gather on Sept. 11 every year. Sophomore Sabrina Curran, director of faith & service in student government, was in charge of planning this year’s memorial prayer service.“Planning this event amidst the coronavirus pandemic was by no means an easy task,” Curran said in her opening speech.Now, in the era of COVID-19, such physical togetherness that was characteristic of the memorial services of previous years is not possible in the same way, yet first-year Annmarie Hackworthy said the emotional support and fellowship of the Notre Dame community was not lacking in Friday’s event.“Everybody still was distanced, but you could tell that we still have that unity,” Hackworthy said. “The way everybody was standing when we came and walked out, it seemed like everyone was hopeful and together and unified in remembrance of 9/11.”On campus in the days following the attacks in 2001, Malloy said there was that same sense of unity present, even amidst the fear of the times.“There was a terrible sense of anxiety; were more things going to happen? So much we had taken for granted was not so assured. And so when we were going to say the Lord’s Prayer during mass, where we usually hold hands, people instinctively locked arms like the alma mater because it was more comforting,” Malloy recalled in his speech.Malloy said he visited New York City around 40 days after the attack. In his speech, he described his horror in witnessing the aftermath of the crashes firsthand.“Watching them retrieve bodies, smelling the smells and hearing the sounds and watching what was like a picture of hell — with things burning, steel being pulled up and while these courageous people were looking for the remains of their colleagues and friends,” Malloy said.Much of today’s Notre Dame’s student body is either too young to remember the infamous day themselves or weren’t alive to experience it, at least in the same way Malloy recalled in his speech on Friday night. Despite this, a generation of post-9/11 students gathered in remembrance and reverence for the lives lost. Hackworthy was not yet born on Sept. 11, 2001. As a member of the Air Force ROTC at Notre Dame, she had the opportunity to present the colors at the memorial, a tradition that she says is a way of honoring those who gave their lives to protect civilians. As she was presenting the colors, Hackworthy said she noticed there was a palpable energy within the grotto.“The atmosphere was very similar to that feeling that you get when you walk into the Grotto,” Hackworthy said. “You’re walking down the stairs, and if you’re walking with someone and you were maybe chatting, and it’s just like a hush, a feeling of a weight off your shoulders, and just kind of a presence of everybody just understanding how special that place is.”Tags: 9/11, memorial, Prayer service, sept. 11, September 11 Nineteen years and 12 hours after the first plane struck the World Trade Center, the Notre Dame community came together to remember those lost to the tragic events of 9/11 in a prayer service at the Grotto Friday.University President Emeritus Fr. Edward Malloy shared his memories of the day and the response on the campus in the days to come.Following the attacks, Malloy arranged for mass to be held near the flagpole in South Quad. Nearly 10,000 community members came together that afternoon, Malloy recalled. “It was like, ‘Well, the world is up for grabs. We at Notre Dame can be in each other’s presence and that’s consoling, in and of itself,’” Malloy said in his speech.last_img read more


Tony Eligibility Rulings Announced for Five More Shows

January 18, 2021

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first_img Jessie Mueller will be considered eligible in the Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical category for her performance as the titular role in Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. View Comments Jessie Mueller All other decisions were consistent with the shows’ opening night credits. The committee has previously discussed eligibility for 17 productions this season, and will meet once more to discuss final rulings. Listen up: more Tony eligibility rulings are in! The Tony Awards Administration committee has met for the third time this 2013-14 season and made rulings on five additional productions: Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, Outside Mullingar, Bronx Bombers, Machinal and The Bridges of Madison County. Check out the decisions below. The 2014 Tony Awards are just around the corner! The nominations will be announced on April 29 at the Paramount Hotel’s Diamond Horseshoe and the winners announced in a live telecast June 8 on CBS, hosted by Hugh Jackman. Star Files Debra Messing Outside Mullingar stars Debra Messing and Brían F. O’Byrne will be considered eligible in the Best Performance by an Actress and Actor in a Leading Role in a Play categories, respectively.last_img read more


How to develop an effective communication strategy for your credit union

December 18, 2020

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first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr An effective communication strategy is vital to making sure that your credit union’s messages are appropriately deployed and received. It’s also an important part of meeting core organizational objectives.But creating a successful strategy is no easy task. According to research by the Overseas Development Institute, only 12 percent of communication teams believe that their strategic plans strongly support their brand’s top priorities. That’s not a promising number. So how do you take your credit union’s communication strategy from zero to hero? Well, here’s what you should focus on:ObjectivesSetting objectives and goals is the key to the success of your overall strategy. Why? Well, it’s incredibly helpful to establish why you’re developing one in the first place, as well as determining what you hope to achieve with it. Maybe your goal is to receive at least a 50% open rate on eblasts. Maybe you want to minimize questions and unrest about an impending merger. No matter what it is, set a goal and go for it. continue reading »last_img read more