…on the move

May 12, 2021

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Neil Patrick has decided toleave the HR industry after 30 years. After three years at StoddardInternational, as head of HR. Patrick, 47, (right) took up his new post asassociate director last month of recruitment company Ian Young ExecutiveSearch. Neil previously held the top HR jobin paper manufacturer Inveresk and knitwear manufacturer Lyle and Scott.Patrick will be succeeded by Gordon Watts who has been promoted from within thecompany.Cherri Marshall hasbeen appointed HR manager at profession services company Deloitte and Touche.Marshall, who started her new position last month, moved from her role as HRconsultant for Axa Insurance. She had previously worked for four years assenior HR officer with Nestlé UK.Paul Harris has beenappointed personnel officer at Warrington Borough Council. He will focus hisattentions on advice and support, training and sickness. Previously Harris waspersonnel officer (resource and relations) for at Knownley Metropolitan BoroughCouncil.which he joined in 1997.Ken Bryant has beenappointed HR manager with Bevan Ashford Solicitors (West Country). He is taskedwith earning the solicitors the Investors in People Award – a feat he achievedin his former position as personnel and training manager at Devon Training forSkills. His priorities in his new role will be to improve the appraisal systemand training for the companies 250 staff.Top jobCarolyn Gray has been appointeddirector of policy and services at manufacturing company Smiths Group.Gray, who started last month,  moved from her position as head of HR policyand HR strategy for e-commerce at Sainsbury’s.  She says she is “hugelyexcited” about her new role and the challenges it will bring. Last yearSmiths merged with engineering company TI group and she will be heavilyinvolved in merging the companies’ two HR policies.Fellow of the CIPD, Gray’s focalpoint will be the development of e-HR strategies, including the installationand implementation of Smiths’ global HR system.Gray said, “I am energised bymy new position, the challenges are immense. I will be able to make use of myexperiences in every HR function, but am really looking forward to using my e-HRknowledge to improve the company’s communication and increase theorganisation’s profits.” Gray will report to Anne Minto,director of HR, along with John Ginn who has also joined Smith’s HR team asdirector of compensation and benefits.Personal profileChristine Hurst is HR directorat Radiant Networks She moved to Radiant after a period as an HR consultant.Before that Hurst was HR director at cable comms company Bell Cablemedia. Shewas a member of the HR steering committee that took the company into a four-waymerger to form Cable & Wireless Communications.What is the mostimportant lesson you have learnt in your career?How theenvironment in which people work and how they are managed can change theirbehaviour.What is the strangestsituation you have had to deal with at work?Being held”hostage” in my office for three hours while an employee stood on thewindow ledge threatening to jump (he didn’t!)If you had two wishes to changeyour company, what would they be?To keep oursurroundings but be located nearer London (for recruitment), and to be theemployer of choice in the broadband wireless sector.What is the best thingabout working in HR?Being able toinfluence people’s working lives.What is the worst?Not always being able tosay what I think.If you could adopt themanagement style of a historical character, whose would you adopt and why?Bill Clinton because heseems to be able to get away with anything and still get respect.What would you do if you had morespare time?Read more books andshop  – not the kind you do inSainsbury’s.If you were to write abook, which subject would you choose to write about?Following IQ and EQ I’dwrite a book called 0Q about how it’s possible to do well in the business worldwithout formal qualifications. Comments are closed. …on the moveOn 6 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


Poor conditions pushing staff out of call centres

May 12, 2021

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first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Poor conditions pushing staff out of call centresOn 24 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Call centres are still struggling to retain staff because of anti-socialshift patterns, poor pay and stressful working conditions, according to a majorreport on the industry. The study, published last week, reveals that although there have beenimprovements in training, career progression, flexible working and bonusschemes, call centres are still failing to retain staff. Pay and Conditions in Call Centres 2002 reveals that call centre managersbelieve that low pay rates are the most important factor in losing staff. Paylevels for new staff are still only £12,400 on average, despite increasesacross the sector of 4.6 per cent last year. Six out of 10 of the 133 organisations polled cite retention problems – upfrom half in last year’s survey. Average staff turnover rates have increased by2.5 per cent to 24.5 per cent since 2001. Half of the call centre organisations polled also report difficultiesrecruiting staff. Sarah Miller, one of the report’s authors, believes that staff burn-out isone of the main reasons for the staffing problems.It shows that a third ofcompanies run a 24-hour, seven-day week operation, while three out of 10 areopen seven days a week. “More work needs to be done on flexible working and job designs – theroles need to be less monotonous. Staff need to be multi-skilled and given morebreaks. It takes more than pay [to retain staff],” said Miller. Shey Garland, chief executive at Garland Call Centre – who has ultimateresponsibility for HR – agrees that one of the keys to retention is to makework interesting. She said: “The main reasons for staff leaving is boredomand stress. Variation is key.” By Paul Nelsonwww.incomesdata.co.uk Comments are closed. last_img read more


Outsourcing giant faces protests over payroll upgrade

May 12, 2021

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first_imgOutsourcing giant faces protests over payroll upgradeBy Jo Faragher on 11 Apr 2019 in Zero hours, Employee communications, Industrial action / strikes, Latest News, Information & consultation, Trade unions, Personnel Today, Payroll, Employment contracts, Sick pay No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Cleaners are among the outsourced staff who have been hit by the payroll change The outsourcing company ISS faces protests today over changes to its payroll system that will see it withhold the pay of thousands of workers. ISS workers include security guards, porters and caterers at a number of prominent private sector employers and NHS hospitals. The payroll upgrade will mean that staff are paid one week later than they are currently. The money owed will be paid to them when they leave the company.Payroll changesCan an employer change the date on which it pays employees?Letter to an employee proposing to change the method of paying him or herThe GMB union has organised a “day of action” today at south London hospitals, while the RMT union has urged action by cleaners working for the company on its Arriva Rail North bus contract.ISS employees at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital and Broadgreen Hospital said they had been informed at the end of March of the changes to the payroll cycle, known by management as ‘Project Greenfield’.Their next new pay date will be 9 May, when they will have worked for three weeks but only been paid for two weeks.One employee said: “To think that ISS has at some point had a meeting and decided to take a week’s pay off low-paid staff and keep it is beyond despicable morally.”Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe, national officer for health at the Unite union, which is also supporting the action, said: “Without proper consultation this multi-billion pound company is withholding the pay of hard-working cleaners and security guards. Many workers who live from pay cheque to pay cheque are struggling to make ends meet and will face genuine hardship as a result.”In a statement, ISS responded: “Currently we operate 15 different pay cycles, which is complex to manage. To prepare us for the transition to the new payroll system, from 9 May we are moving to just one fortnightly pay cycle and one monthly pay cycle.”“A range of loan options are available to suit individual circumstances, with repayment options from eight weeks up to 30 weeks. Local managers are having proactive one-to-one discussions with their employees to ensure that our people receive the financial and emotional support to meet their specific needs. ISS will not withhold any money that is payable to any employee.”The GMB union is also campaigning to get the NHS hospital contractors – many of whom are on zero-hours contracts – the day-one sick pay rights that their salaried colleagues have.Helen O’Connor, GMB regional organiser, called ISS an “exploitative contractor”.She said: “The list of injustices being meted out against ISS workers by their managers appears to be endless and relentless.“ISS has no regard for the wellbeing of its workforce and it is beyond belief that low paid workers can be expected to pay back loans in excess of £300 a month of their own wages so that a multi-million-pound global company like ISS can change their pay cycles.”  Payroll opportunities on Personnel TodayBrowse more payroll jobs Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more


US women soccer stars Ali Krieger and Ashlyn Harris get married

May 8, 2021

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first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailartisteer/iStock(NEW YORK) — Two of U.S. women’s soccer’s biggest stars are officially married. Ashlyn Harris, a goalkeeper for the U.S. Women’s National Team (USWNT), and Ali Krieger, a defender, tied the knot over the weekend in Miami in a glamorous wedding attended by their teammates, including Megan Rapinoe.The hashtag for Harris and Krieger’s wedding was #AliGotaKeeper, a reference to Harris’ position.Krieger, 35, wore a white wedding gown and Harris, 34, wore a tuxedo designed by Thom Browne.The newlyweds, who both also play for the Orlando Pride, were joined Saturday by many of their past and present World Cup teammates, including Abby Wambach and co-captains of the 2019 World Cup-winning team Rapinoe and Alex Morgan.The couple chose a rainbow-colored wedding cake to celebrate their union.They also celebrated the fact that they could actually get married, choosing as a reading at their ceremony the 2015 Supreme Court opinion written by now-retired Justice Anthony Kennedy that made same-sex marriage legal, according to Wambach’s wife Glennon Doyle, who shared details of the moment on Instagram.“Thank you, thank you for last night, @ashlynharris24 and @alikrieger. Your love makes everyone who knows you braver and softer and truer. You are loved,” Doyle wrote. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. December 30, 2019 /Sports News – National US women soccer stars Ali Krieger and Ashlyn Harris get marriedcenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more


Third train of Cameron LNG project enters final commissioning stage

May 7, 2021

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first_img Image: Computer rendering of Cameron LNG project. (Credit: Sempra Energy) Sempra LNG said that the phase 1 of the Cameron LNG project in Louisiana has entered the final commissioning stage following the introduction of feed gas into the third liquefaction train.The phase 1 of the liquefaction-export project in Hackberry, being developed by the Sempra Energy subsidiary and its partners, comprises three LNG trains. Put together, the three trains will have an estimated export capacity of about 12 million tonnes per annum (Mtpa) or nearly 1.7 billion cubic feet per day of LNG.Last month, the second train of the Cameron LNG project began commercial operations, while the first train achieved the same milestone in August 2019.The third train is set to be on track to achieve commercial operations as scheduled for the third quarter of 2020. Prior to this, initial LNG production from the third train is likely to begin in the second quarter of 2020.According to Sempra LNG, already 58 cargoes of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have been shipped from the liquefaction-export project.Sempra LNG chief operating officer and Cameron LNG board chair Lisa Glatch said: “We are proud of Sempra LNG’s development of this project as well as Cameron LNG’s employees and contractors who have built and are operating this facility. With a commitment to health and safety first, the commissioning and startup of Train 3 will help meet demand from global markets for cleaner and more secure energy sources.”Sempra Energy indirectly has a stake of 50.2% in the Cameron LNG export project and is partnered by Total, Mitsui, and Japan LNG Investment.McDermott, Chiyoda have been executing the EPC of the Cameron LNG project phase 1The engineering, procurement, construction and commissioning (EPC) for the first phase of the Cameron LNG project is being executed by McDermott International and Chiyoda International under a contract worth around $6bn.McDermott North, Central and South America senior vice president Mark Coscio said: “Congratulations to everyone on the Cameron LNG project team for their continued commitment to project delivery and high-quality standards as we work toward completion of Train 3.“Their hard work and strong safety performance have propelled us to the final train of the project and we look forward to keeping this momentum through completion.” Phase 1 of the Cameron LNG project will feature three LNG trains with a combined liquefaction capacity of about 12Mtpa last_img read more


Russia: PF Task Force Heads for Kamchatka

May 4, 2021

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first_img View post tag: News by topic Russia: PF Task Force Heads for Kamchatka Pacific Fleet (PF) task force headed by Capt 1 rank Viktor Sokolov and consisting of Guard missile cruiser Varyag, large ASW ships Admiral Vinogradov, Admiral Tributs, and destroyer Bystry performs training tasks in the northern part of the Sea of Japan; the force is heading for Kamchatka in order to attend large-scale maneuvers of Eastern Military District.The task force command has formed several surface ship groups conducting various functions, and arranged all kinds of drills and defenses on the way to the exercise area.ASW aviation permanently assists PF task force along the whole cruise route. It performs scheduled flights in order to search and detect “enemy” submarines and conducts long-range antisubmarine patrols.PF marine units on board the ships carry out anti-terror drills in the night time.Recall that Eastern Military District will hold active phase of large-scale maneuvers in mid-Sept near Kamchatka Peninsula. In the course of the exercise, PF warships will perform missile, torpedo, and gun firings, as well as landing assault operation on unprepared coast.In total, over 50 warships and support vessels, 50 aircrafts, and up to 10,000 military servicemen and civilian specialists will participate in the coming exercise.[mappress]Source: rusnavy, September 12, 2011; View post tag: Task Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: PF Task Force Heads for Kamchatka View post tag: Russia View post tag: Navy View post tag: PF View post tag: Kamchatkacenter_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: For September 12, 2011 Training & Education View post tag: Force View post tag: heads Share this articlelast_img read more


Wealthy backgrounds lead to higher graduate earnings

May 3, 2021

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first_imgOn the issue of why those from wealthier backgrounds might do better than their peers in competition for the very highest earning jobs, the study offers suggestions but no firm answer. According to one postgraduate with experience in business and hiring processes however, “it remains an unfortunate reality that wealthy, influential families have connections that can give certain graduates an unfair advantage in hiring processes for highly-paid roles.” Jonathan Black, director of the Oxford Careers Service, highlighted the initiatives run by the university that aim to address any disadvantages brought about by household income or gender. He told Cherwell, “the Careers Service provides connections with alumni (to address any social capital deficits) for students, and training programmes are being introduced (eg, Springboard for women students) to address any confidence issues.“The Moritz-Heyman scholarships programme, which particularly targets students from low-income and disadvantaged backgrounds, includes as part of its support for on-course students funded internship opportunities that allow students to pursue valuable work experience while having their costs covered.”­­­ A recent study on graduate income has revealed that students from wealthy backgrounds go on to earn more than those from less well-off families. The findings of the report also indicate a disparity in the earnings of men and women, as well as differences based upon the course studied and institution attended by the graduate.The study was a collaboration between the Institute for Fiscal Studies, Institute of Education, University of Cambridge and Harvard University, with funding from the Nuffield Foundation. The Institute for Fiscal Studies’ (IFS) press release states ‘the average student from a higher-income background earned about 10% more than the average student from other backgrounds.’ Zoe Fannon, currently reading for an MPhil in Economics, told Cherwell, “the question in both cases is why individuals from less-wealthy families and female graduates seem to not end up in the high-paid jobs.” The disparity grew at the very top of the earnings spectrum. ‘The 10% highest-earning male graduates from richer backgrounds earned about 20% more than the 10% highest earners from relatively poorer backgrounds even after taking account of subject and the characteristics of the university attended. The equivalent premium for the 10% highest-earning female graduates from richer backgrounds was 14%.’ She was eager to address the information the study was based on and said “they only have data on the graduates who took out loans from the Student Loan Company.” As a result of how income thresholds are calculated, “the graduates from wealthy families are mostly people whose parents are professionals rather than people whose parents own companies or run hedge funds (because they would likely pay fees straight up rather than taking out a loan).” Oxford was no exception in the study. While ‘more than 10% of male graduates from LSE, Oxford and Cambridge were earning in excess of £100,000 a year ten years after graduation in 2012/13’ only LSE had over 10% of its female graduates earning above the same figure.last_img read more


Bakers’ Benevolent Society to hold family open day

April 21, 2021

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first_imgThe Bakers’ Benevolent Society (BBS) is holding a family open day, following the success of its 150th annniversary open day last year.It will be held on Sunday 5 July at Bakers’ Villas in Epping, Essex. Its president, the honourable Moira Rank, will be present, as will members of the Worshipful Company of Bakers and trade associations.The gates will open at 1pm and the theme this year will be ‘jazz’. There is a New Orleans jazz band booked for the afternoon and there will be a hog roast and barbecue.There will also be an opportunity for BBS supporters to see how donations have been spent, and the work that has been carried out at Bakers’ Villas.last_img read more


Speech: Climate Change: Turning emergency into opportunity

April 20, 2021

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first_imgIntroductionMy original working title for this speech was: ‘Is climate change the new Brexit?’My point was that it’s not. You can worry about Brexit if you want, but you’ll be worrying about the wrong thing. If you rank the things that could literally kill us on a scale of one to ten, Brexit isn’t even a one. Climate change is a ten.That said, there are similarities between Brexit and climate change. The timescales of both are uncertain and the consequences highly contested. They will both directly affect everyone in this room, governments, businesses, the public, our daily lives. Most important of all, we have agency on both: the key factor in whether either of them ultimately turn out for better or for worse is what we do now.Why resilience to climate change needs to be at the top of everyone’s agendaLet’s start with why this matters, with why climate change needs to be at the top of everyone’s agenda. I set this out in a speech last September called Too True To Be Good. I won’t repeat all that: you can find it online if you want. But here’s the short version.Climate change is happening: the evidence is compelling and no serious scientist denies it. There has always been climate change: almost since the Earth formed, natural processes have driven cycles which cause ice ages and global warming. We wouldn’t be here if this hadn’t happened.However the climate change we are now experiencing is different, because this time it’s being caused by humans – by the emissions from fossil fuels since the start of the industrial revolution which have greatly increased the amount of carbon dioxide and similar gases in our atmosphere.These gasses are creating a greenhouse effect around the planet which means temperatures are increasing. This has two major effects. It is making the world’s seas rise, as landlocked ice melts. And it’s making the world’s weather more extreme.And this, ladies and gentlemen, is a bad thing. The result will be (and already is) more frequent and more extreme flooding; faster and more extreme coastal erosion; more frequent and more extreme droughts, water shortages and fires; more pollution; and potentially existential damage to habitats, plants and wildlife.We are already seeing all of these effects. Unless we tackle them, they will have profound and potentially terminal consequences for everything that matters to us. Some parts of the planet, including in this country, may become unliveable. While you can recover from a flood, there is no recovery from a rising sea: it takes land, communities, infrastructure and everything else away forever.The business models of many companies will cease to work. Example: the greatest risk to the water companies the Environment Agency regulates is the gap that climate change is likely to open up between the supply of water and the demand for it – what I called the Jaws of Death in another speech a few weeks ago.And without enough water or the other inputs which climate change puts at risk, our wider economy may cease to function. Our politics may be changed utterly, as people demand action from their leaders on what may become the only issue that matters. Our world may become more dangerous, as conflict over water and other scarce resources escalate. At worst, our planet may simply become unviable as a place for the species who caused all this: us.That is why climate change is simply the biggest issue there is. It is the biggest threat out there to our economy, environment, health, way of life, our country, our world, and our future.Bill Shankly, the legendary manager of Liverpool FC, said that of course football wasn’t a matter of life and death: it was much more important than that. So: climate change is not the new Brexit. It is much more important than that, and it is a matter of life and death.How to tackle climate change successfullyThe good news is that it doesn’t have to be like this. We can tackle climate change successfully if we act now and act together.We know what we need to do: mitigate and adapt.We need to mitigate the causes of climate change, by cutting our emissions of greenhouse gases. Most of the UK’s emissions come from the way we produce and consume energy – from heating our buildings, driving our cars, manufacturing goods, watching our TVs or boiling our kettles. We can lower our emissions by becoming more energy efficient and switching to renewable or low-carbon fuels.We’ve made a good start on that. UK emissions are down 43% compared to 1990, while over the same period the economy has grown significantly. That’s really important: it shows that we can both tackle climate change and grow our economy.But here’s the catch: most of these reductions in emissions have come from closing down coal power stations and cleaning up heavy industry. That was the easy bit. It’s a lot harder to reduce emissions from transport, agriculture and buildings. That will require much greater use of renewable energy, and infrastructure to capture and store remaining carbon emissions.And we need to go much further than that. A truly successful response to climate change requires us not just to change our technology but to change our whole way of living and of thinking. We need a revolution in the head. This is about much more than just cutting emissions – it’s about turning our thinking on its head to plan for a sustainable future in which we are responsible consumers of stuff and responsible custodians of the planet’s future. We don’t yet have all the answers, and we should recognise that. But we do know that by radically changing the way we live, think about and plan for the future we can build a thriving economy, vibrant communities, and a more resilient world.Much of this is about our lifestyle choices. As I said, we have agency. We are free to make those choices: about how we work, how we travel, what kind of buildings we live in, what food we eat, how we use the land around us, how we transport the things we need, how we heat our homes, right down to how we wash ourselves and how we dry our clothes.So much for mitigating the drivers of climate change. We also need to adapt to its effects, by preparing for, reducing and as far as possible negating them. That will include building stronger flood defences to reduce the vulnerability of communities along our coasts and rivers. It will include – if we want to avoid the Jaws of Death – investing in new reservoirs and desalination plants. And it will mean building infrastructure that is designed to be resilient to the more extreme weather we know is coming.But again, it’s not really about the hardware in our cities, it’s about the software in our heads. It’s about how we think and behave. While we do need more defences and more resilient infrastructure, we need most of all to work with rather than against nature and to build places and communities which are naturally resilient to a changing climate. And we need to face up to some inconvenient truths: like the fact that some of our communities are in places – eroding coastlines, flood-prone floodplains – which will not be safe or liveable over the long term; and that the best response may ultimately be not to build ever higher walls until the day the waves inevitably come over the top, but to move the communities away from the risk.Turning risk into opportunityPerhaps most important of all, we are beginning to understand that while climate change brings fearsome risks it also brings huge opportunities if we get our response right.There are opportunities for business. The insurance companies are pricing climate change into their policies and looking to help their customers become more resilient to its effects, not least because that can cut insurance payouts when things like flooding happen. The water companies, energy companies, retail sector and others see the hard-nosed business sense in investing now for resilience later.That’s why Clean Growth is a key plank of the government’s Industrial Strategy and why the Industrial Challenge Fund is putting £4.7bn into innovation, including energy transformation, industrial decarbonisation, electrification, and driverless vehicles.There are opportunities for Finance Ministries, business planners and investors. The cost of mitigating and adapting to climate change is far outweighed by the economic benefits – in terms of damage foregone, extra growth achieved through new investment and infrastructure, prosperity boosted through innovative technology, profits made from new business opportunity.There’s a fundamental point here and it’s this: good business can benefit the environment, and there’s money in mitigation. We can cut emissions, enhance resilience, make money and create a better world, all at the same time.Here’s an example. International pension funds are constantly looking to invest in opportunities which will bring a profitable but secure return over the long term. Establishing schemes which (say) allow those pension funds to invest in planting the right trees in the right places would offer multiple benefits.It would reduce flood risk, as forests slow the flow of water down into rivers; improve water quality, as water running into those rivers is purified by the woodland environment; mitigate climate change, as trees lock up the carbon that would otherwise cause global warming; help keep the rivers and roads cool (good for people and wildlife); reduce air pollution; enhance the landscape; boost amenity value and enhance the wellbeing of the humans who walked or lived near those trees. Critically, it would also produce attractive long term regular commercial returns for the pension fund as a proportion of the mature trees were harvested and sold every year.There are opportunities for government. We all know that you should never waste a good crisis. If (like Brexit) climate change has created an unfrozen moment where what was not politically possible now becomes essential, there’s an opportunity to craft new policies that will fit us for a climate changed future, and a better one.You can see that in the 25 Year Environment Plan launched last year by the Prime Minister and Michael Gove. It commits the government to take all possible action to mitigate climate change. But it also sees that action as a way to achieve the audacious ambition at the heart of the Plan: to be the first generation to leave the environment in a better state than we found it. There are opportunities for politicians. The climate strike movement among schoolchildren shows not only that young people put this issue at the top of the agenda, but that they are prepared to do something about it. The politicians and parties that embrace and capitalise on this youth movement will be far more powerful than those that don’t.There are opportunities for NGOs. Climate change offers them the opportunity to enlist a new generation of young people outraged at the risks to their future; and perhaps to reframe this debate in ways that will mobilise more than just the usual activists – as less about the environment and more about the future of the new generation and the planet they are about to inherit.There are opportunities for the Environment Agency and the work we do to reduce flood risk. The costs of building and maintaining flood defences are dwarfed by the benefits – economic, social and other – of the enhanced national resilience they bring. There are opportunities to think radically and differently about how we secure that greater resilience alongside greater prosperity. We will set out our new thinking next month when we launch our new Flood and Coastal Erosion Strategy.Seven Brexit lessonsI said climate change wasn’t the new Brexit. But I do think there are lessons we can learn from Brexit for how to tackle climate change.Lesson one: look for the opportunities as well as the risks. Brexit carries both: we are all seeking to manage down the risks and realise the opportunities. We should treat climate change the same way.Lesson two: if it matters, give it absolute priority. What they teach aspiring CEOs at Harvard Business School is this: the main thing is to make sure that the main thing really is the main thing. Brexit has been the main thing for many of us over the last three years. That makes sense: it is both urgent and important, and we have all been right to devote time, resources and energy to getting it right. But if you buy the argument that the main thing is actually climate change, then we all need to be devoting as much effort over the next few years to tackling that as we have devoted over the last few years to Brexit.Lesson three: if you’re tackling a unique challenge, don’t run it as business as usual. The Environment Agency, like the rest of government, the emergency services and local authorities with whom we work, has prepared for a possible No Deal exit as if it were a major incident, with proper contingency planning, incident rooms, mechanisms for real time decision making, etc. Maybe we need similar arrangements for tackling climate change, because climate change is the biggest incident there is.Lesson four: use reasonable worst case scenarios to stress test your organisation. That’s what all our organisations have been doing with a possible No Deal Brexit. We’ve all asked how, if there were disruption to ports and supply chains, economic shocks or civil unrest, we would sustain our operations. Doing that analysis taught us all something about our potential vulnerabilities in other scenarios too, gaps we are all now plugging. The same applies to climate change and its effect on our organisations, with one difference: unlike a No Deal Brexit, we know climate change will happen. If you aren’t already asking how your organisation would cope, why not? And if you aren’t, your Audit and Risk Committee soon will. As will your customers and stakeholders, which leads me to….Lesson five: think about your reputation. It is safe to say that not all reputations have been enhanced by Brexit. There’s a lesson there for climate change too. Ask yourself this: what will getting our response to climate change wrong do to the reputation of my organisation? Look for the hidden reputational risks. Is your vehicle fleet as low emission as it can be? Are your suppliers burning a lot of hydrocarbons? Are your pension funds invested in companies that are part of the solution, or are you actually funding part of the problem?Lesson six: mind your language. There have been a lot of intemperate words on all sides in the Brexit debate. They have usually generated more heat than light. The language we use matters. The right language can frame the debate in the right way. Striking language can get people’s attention. So too with climate change. If words like “climate change” and “global warming” have become a turn-off for most ordinary people, let’s use different words. Perhaps we should stop talking about climate change and call it what it now is: a climate emergency. Better still, let’s use language that lifts our emotions up rather than drags us all down. Let’s talk about what the right response to climate change will give us: sweet water, clean air, safe homes, a planet that stays blue and green not brown and grey.Seventh and final lesson from Brexit for how to tackle this climate emergency; and it’s this: if you want to succeed, build a broad coalition. Not just cross party, but between government, business and the third sector, and critically with the public. While climate change isn’t the new Brexit, pulling together as a nation to focus on tackling climate change could help bring our country back together. After nearly three years of argument over Brexit, all the polls show that most people want to move on. Many want something bigger to believe in that they can work towards and connect with on an emotional level. Climate change could provide that rallying point. Because while there may or may not turn out to be a Plan B for Brexit, there is no Planet B for us.last_img read more


Negative ‘Impact’ on learning

March 1, 2021

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first_img Law School conference hears from coalition on roots of activism, ideas for improving police-community relations Student achievement gap same after nearly 50 years, study says Off-field experiences sharpen NFL players’ criminal justice focus But at least it’s not getting wider, say authors, who cite decline in teacher quality as offsetting programs like Head Start Assistant Professor in Sociology Joscha Legewie takes a big-data approach to his inequality research. His most recent scholarship, published in American Sociological Review, found that aggressive policing in New York City had significant educational and social consequences for African American boys. Researched with Columbia Law School’s Jeffrey Fagan, the study credits New York City’s Operation Impact — a program that added police officers to high-crime neighborhoods — with temporarily lowering crime rates in the impacted neighborhoods. However, linking information about Operation Impact with a quarter of a million teens shows that the program led to significantly lower test scores for African American boys. Legewie, who joined Harvard’s faculty last year, spoke to the Gazette about the work.Q&AJoscha LegewieGAZETTE: How did this research bubble up?LEGEWIE: For more than 10 years, I’ve been working on racial bias in policing. I was mainly interested in spatial and temporal patterns of policing, so I spent a lot of time looking at maps of New York City. One thing that struck me was the extreme level of exposure to policing in some neighborhoods, so I thought, “What are the consequences for the education and health of minority youth?” It started as a side project. The rate of police stops and arrests was as high as 976 per 1,000 for 18-year-old black men between 2004 and 2012. But at the time I didn’t have the data infrastructure in place to answer this question.GAZETTE: How much data are we talking about, and when did you know you had interesting material?LEGEWIE: The study is based on data from 1 million students in New York City Public Schools combined with information on millions of police stops, arrests, and crimes from the New York Police Department. One of the most challenging aspects of this research has been the access to and management of these different large-scale administrative data sources. It involves working with different government agencies, managing data contracts, and other administrative work. But it also involves understanding data systems that are not always designed for social science research and that might lack detailed documentation. The Research Alliance for NYC Schools at New York University has been a great help with that. In the end, it took several years to assemble and combine the various data sources. But I also think there are great benefits to building the relationships necessary for this kind of data access, which is a more direct connection to the policy world.GAZETTE: What did you find?LEGEWIE: The study started with a question: What are the consequences of aggressive, broken-window policing [a law enforcement theory holding that visible signs of crime, anti-social behavior, and civil disorder — for example vandalism — create an environment that encourages further crime and disorder] for the educational outcomes of minority youth? On the one hand, policing might reduce violent crime with potential benefits for students in high-crime areas. On the other hand, it might reduce educational outcome by creating stress or mistrust in policing that bleeds over from the criminal justice system to the school system. To answer this question, our study focused on Operation Impact, which quickly increased the number of police officers in so-called “impact zones.” We found a 40 percent increase in police stops and a 20 percent increase in low-level arrests after areas are designated impact zones. And we found that the program did decrease crime rates. But we also found that African American boys aged 13 to 15 experienced a substantial negative effect on their test scores, which roughly corresponds to about a fifth of the black-white test-score gap. The impact was confined to older black boys. Other groups — younger African American boys, Hispanic boys, and girls — were not affected by the policing program. GAZETTE: Why is this research important?LEGEWIE: Our study is part of growing literature that looks at the social consequences of policing, and I think our research contributes to this work in at least two important ways.center_img Related The first is that most research in the area focuses on parental incarceration, even though law enforcement and policing are a central — and the most visible — part of the criminal justice system. A large proportion of minority youth have some form of contact with the police at a very young age, and a majority experience indirect police contact through friends, family, or the community at large. I think it is extremely important to understand the consequences of this contact, and our study makes important contributions to this question.Secondly, most research focuses on the consequences of direct contact with the criminal justice system such as arrests or, in some cases, police stops, but very few look at indirect effects such as neighborhood-level exposure to police programs. Ethnographic research powerfully demonstrates that the consequences of policing are not confined to the individuals who are stopped and arrested by the police. So the focus on indirect, neighborhood-based effects is an important extension of previous research that helps us to better understand the link between the criminal justice system and social inequality. So when you think about police accountability, it is important to consider these broader social consequences and costs. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more