Lions 2013: Five Things we’ve learned. Second Test

June 23, 2021

gtqxsfod

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img Captain’s performance: Sam Warburton drives deep into the Wallaby half but is now a doubt for the deciding TestBy Paul WilliamsThe pendulum has swungTHE LIONS lost the second test, and the Series momentum, in what was a tense, absorbing 15–16 defeat to the Wallabies.  The Lions can have no argument with this loss. Both the scrum and, to a lesser extent, the lineout, were fragile – the scrum was such an ‘Achilles heel’ in the first half that it was worthy of amputation. The inability to consistently secure ball from the set piece contributed to the Lions gaining an alarmingly low 36% territory and 37% possession – in fact the score was surprisingly close when you consider the disparity in these key stats.This isn’t to say that there weren’t any positives – there were. The breakdown was refereed as a contest which allowed Sam Warburton to thrive and to deliver his finest performance of the tour. The defensive line was solid and Leigh Halfpenny’s goal-kicking was once again above test standard – so good, in fact, that many drew breath even when he missed a mammoth 50 yarder. But this tour is no longer about taking positives – it’s about taking chances. The Lions have one left.Ongoing problem: The Lions lineout needs to improveLineout issues remainOn paper the Lion’s lineout functioned well – losing just one. However the quality of the possession secured wasn’t as clear cut. As has often been the case during this tour securing safer front and middle ball wasn’t a big issue – with the exception of the Lion’s final lineout from which Liam Gill leapt on the loose ball and won a penalty. But the ‘moneyball’ at the tail of the lineout once again eluded the Lions when it mattered – on two occasions the Lions squandered ball at the tail. Ball from the tail of the lineout is the highest quality possession available in modern rugby, particularly with the current instability of elite scrums.A seven-man lineout guarantees that all of the opposition’s forwards are out of the defensive line – which sits a full ten metres away. However, a messy ‘tap-down’ negates all of the advantages. Messy lineout possession requires the scrum half to wait for the ball to bounce, change his body shape and, often, the hand from which he passes – taking anything up to two seconds. A typical test back can cover 40 metres in 5.5 seconds, meaning that during a two second lineout ‘fumble’ the defensive line has moved up approximately seven yards. Seven yards was like seven miles in a game test match of this magnitude.Scrum collapseThe scrum has so far been one of the Lion’s strengths – in the second test, it became a crippling weakness. We haven’t seen such a rapid transition from strength to weakness since Samson nipped to the barbers and asked for a ‘Grade 1’. During the first half the Lion’s scrum conceded six points as a direct result of scrum penalties – two thirds of the Wallabies first half points haul. That is a sizeable concession of points when you consider that the two test matches have so far been decided by a combined margin of just three points. Many will blame Mako Vunipola, solely, for the failure, but that’s unfair. The scrum weakness wasn’t solely the loose-head’s fault – as the introduction of Richard Hibbard, a hooker, proved. A front row of Hibbard and Alex Corbisiero appears necessary for the final test.No gainline means no clean-breaksFor the first time on this tour, the Lions failed to make a single clean-break. But the lack of clean-breaks wasn’t the problem, it was the symptom. The problem was an inability to get over the gainline. If you consistently make it over the gainline, defensive lines need to scramble and thus defensive mismatches arise – quickly followed by the elusive clean-breaks. Due to a lack of possession and an unreliable set piece, the Lions laboured their way over the gainline and were consistently forced to carry the ball into well defended channels or kick possession away.The paucity of gain-line carries and clean breaks were further compounded by the team selection and on-going injury crisis. When the gainline is difficult to cross you need players who thrive in that scenario. This was a game made for Jamie Roberts and Mike Phillips. I suspect next week will be too.Iconic moment: George North takes man and ballThe iconic George North In truth, by his own vertigo inducing high standards, George North failed the make the impact in the second Test that he did in the first. He dived out of the defensive line and Israel Folau caused him problems when collecting cross-field kicks. However it is the sign of a world class player that even when things haven’t gone your way that you create an iconic moment of rugby history. North popping Folau on his shoulder will live long in the memory of supporters – and Israel Folau’s. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 29: George North of the Lions lifts Israel Folau of Wallabies while carrying the ball during game two of the International Test Series between the Australian Wallabies and the British & Irish Lions at Etihad Stadium on June 29, 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images for HSBC) It was as audacious a show of strength as you will ever see on the rugby field. Folau is 6ft 4inches tall and weighs 16 stone 2lbs – yet George North, whilst moving backwards, flicked him up over his shoulder like a piece of old kitchen linoleum and carried him six yards backwards. Of course, whilst North’s freakish power raised a cheer and a laugh from the Lions supporters, it was Folau and his chums who, in the end, laughed loudest.last_img read more


Scotland: Five things we learned v Italy

June 23, 2021

wmxqttkm

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It was at a point in the game when Scotland sorted their discipline in their own ‘red zone’ but were slightly passive in the tackle, some players worrying too much about not conceding a penalty and opting to have good defensive spacing rather than tearing out of the line. Why can’t Scotland have both after the clock ticks past 70?This is a sharp contrast to the first half where Scotland gave away ten penalties. Granted many of those were in a scrum where Moray Low was pinged off the park (although at least once this was harsh, as Alberto De Marchi pulled him down by the shirt). He will be replaced by Geoff Cross. There should be something said about Scotland’s Daim Bar defence, though – one minute it’s too soft, the other minute it’s too hard, on both occasions it’s brittle. Thumbs up: Duncan Weir acknowledges the crowd after winning the Italy Test at the death, with a drop-goalBy Alan DymockTHE SCOTLAND result was one that brought out relief. The kind of relief that has spectators and coaches strapped to oxygen tanks, so taxing was the enormous sigh everyone let go.However, as everyone was asked immediately after the game about the “monkey off the back” and then, the day after, everyone began talking about “papering over the cracks,” it became apparent that a little more finesse is needed when analyzing Scotland’s win.If it helps, let them do itAn Italy try: Tommaso AllanOnce the result was confirmed, Scott Johnson and Greig Laidlaw seemed somewhat bullish, post-match. A prepared statement sought to go beyond the press and thank the fans for their support.The impression this created was that in Scotland’s camp there is a sense of ‘it’s us versus the world, boys; some people are out to harass us.’ If this is the case, fine. As long as it leads to wins then they can have this attitude. After all, you then get moments where Duncan Weir – who had not taken a match to the heather so far in this tournament – swung a boot so well in the dying moments of the game in Rome, he did something magnificent. And brave. Fair play to him and his team: if there are people out to get them, they landed one blow in retaliation. Now they need more.Scotland appear to have Italy’s numberScotland took their biggest ever comeback win, bounding back from a ten-point deficit, and have now beaten Italy in their last three meetings in three different countries (Scotland in 2013, South Africa in 2013, Italy in 2014).To score tries based on momentum, while Scotland scored from one brilliant break and a one big Italian mistake you would be forgiven for thinking that Italy should win at home. Scotland did just enough though. They spooked Italy. They clawed their way through.The Scots may not have showed anywhere near as much grit against England or Ireland, but they had the confidence against Italy. There’s a lesson in there somewhere… It’s great to see confident backsWe’re used to seeing Stuart Hogg and Sean Lamont backing themselves and having a go from the back, when returning kicks. But how good is it to see a front-line midfielder like Alex Dunbar taking one on the chin and having a dig himself? It paid off.With Matt Scott edging closer to full fitness and Dunbar confident there is a chance they may be able to play with more verve in round four, which is all anyone ever wants to see. A competitive Scotland.Putting in a shift: Richie Gray returned to Scotland’s packPray for fitness miraclesThe day after the game Scotland’s engine room – Richie Gray and Jim Hamilton – were off back to France so they can play in the Top 14 this weekend. If Beattie is away too, three men who came out of the Italy Test with credit in the pack are running a physical gauntlet. Sure they face France who have injuries of their own and with some men playing in the tournament themselves, but they are used to it and have a lot more depth to pick from.This may be a nervous weekend for Johnson.80-minute concentration still elusive Josh Furno swept to a try at a crucial point of the game. After Italy pressured Scotland when the visitors should have been looking after ball and using it cleanly. Scotland’s lock Richie Gray (C) is tackled by Italy’s centre Gonzalo Garcia (R) and Tommaso Allan (L) during the Six Nations International rugby union match between Italy and Scotland on February 22, 2014 at the Olympic stadium in Rome. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLARO (Photo credit should read ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images) last_img read more


Record scorer Pritchard comes out of retirement to answer Canada call-up

June 23, 2021

htxauoum

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img“He announced his retirement but he said if the opportunity came up in the World Cup, he was available, and he’s obviously been training and playing with (English club) Bedford.”Canada face Italy in their second game of the World Cup on Saturday, having lost their opener to Ireland last weekend. James Pritchard comes into the Canada squad as a replacement to the injured Liam Underwood having originally retired from international rugby James Pritchard at the 2011 World Cup LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “It was a massive decision to leave him out (of the original 31),” Canada coach Kieran Crowley said at a press conference on Thursday. “James has been an outstanding servant to Canadian rugby, the highest points scorer. As I said to him at the time, the mix (of the squad) had gone past him, but be ready,” TAGS: Canada James Pritchard has been called into the Canada squad to replace the injured Liam Underwood despite having retired from international rugby last month.Pritchard, who is Canada’s record points scorer with 589 in 57 caps, was left out of the Canucks original 31-man squad and announced his retirement.But the 36-year-old, who plays for English Championship side Bedford Blues, informed coaches he would be available should they need him and Underwood’s injury has resulted in his comeback.last_img read more


Could a second-string World Cup knockout tournament work?

June 23, 2021

cxvhjcui

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_imgIf nothing else, the “fallow” midweeks would be filled, and that means less talk about Craig Joubert and his toilet needs. Come on, let’s give it some serious thought. There is still a problem with the World Cup – the lack of a second-string knockout tournament. How about a competition for the pools’ 3rd and 4th-placed teams? Could England partake in another tournament? Photo:Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The crowd at the Rec would love a major international tournament gameAnd if there’s a worry that teams won’t be too enthusiastic about the idea, how about we take away the automatic qualification for the subsequent World Cup that goes hand in hand with finishing third in the pool?Instead, all 12 teams go into this further tournament – let’s call it the Qualifiers, just to be original – and qualification for the next World Cup is on the line. Win your pool – with one team from each pool – and you qualify. If you want to add to the excitement, all 12 teams could go into a random draw to decide the avenue they have to go through. Yes, it could mean England would be in a straight fight with Italy, Japan and Georgia (who all finished third in their pool) for one automatic qualification spot, but let’s be honest, how could that not be exciting?Jump to it: Will Fiji be involved in the 2019 World Cup? Photo: Getty ImagesIt would take a bit of thought, and the big teams would certainly need some convincing, but the quality of the “minnows” means they deserve every chance they get. Why should they constantly have to go through qualifying when the the established order don’t have to? At least this way the playing field is levelled, and over time, that can only improve the smaller sides. By Mark CoughlanOK, first thing’s first. Hats off and congratulations to the southern hemisphere. Plenty of other, better-qualified people have had their say this week on the gap between the north and south – not to mention Craig Joubert’s hot-footed departure, and England’s obsession with the name Ian – but I’m not here to talk about any of that. It’s simply that I still have a problem with the World Cup – it’s the lack of a second-string knockout tournament.Ever since the pool stages finished, there’s been a feeling – potentially stronger among those “more casual” rugby fans – that the World Cup has lost some of its sheen. Yes, the quarter-finals were excellent, but the week gap between games makes it difficult to keep the narrative going, and tough to keep interest high for some. Furthermore, the likes of Samoa (after their epic game with Scotland), Japan (after three victories and capturing the global imagination) and England (er… the hosts) leaving the tournament just seems a shame.Japan capturing the global imagination. Photo: AFP/Getty ImagesSevens has long had a tradition of minor knockout tournaments, where the teams who finish third and fourth in each pool go through to compete in their own separate knockout tournaments, and it’s an idea that I believe the World Cup could borrow heavily from. It certainly wouldn’t take anything away from the quarter-finals – they’re obviously still the pinnacle – but imagine if the teams who finished third, fourth and possibly even fifth in each pool headed off to compete in tournaments that are held midweek. The public imagination would continue to be held, and if lower ticket prices could be offered, there certainly wouldn’t be a problem filling the stadiums.Sevens has long had a tradition of minor knockout tournaments. Photo: Getty ImagesSpeaking of which, the manner in which the likes of Exeter, Gloucester and Leicester embraced the few games they hosted was rightly applauded – so isn’t it right that it should have been rewarded too? Allowing the smaller stadiums to host the Plate or Shield tournaments would ensure passionate support – it’s no coincidence that the rugby hotbeds provided some of the most colourful, vibrant atmospheres – and fill the long gap between weekends.Maybe the tournament could even be held at stadiums that didn’t get any of the pool games, to ensure a level of fresh excitement exists. Can anyone really tell me that The Rec, Welford Road or The Stoop wouldn’t pull out all the stops to host a major international game?last_img read more


France: Rugby the most popular team sport… for now

June 23, 2021

fmgwynbf

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A nationwide poll at the start of this month reported that rugby is now the most popular team sport in France. Some 39% of the population preferred rugby to football’s 29%. That could change in the next three weeks if France win the European Championships; expect scenes similar to 1998 when hundreds of thousands danced through Paris after their boys beat Brazil to win the World Cup.Back then Les Bleus were brilliant in both sports. France won their second successive Grand Slam in 1998 and 12 months later, in rugby’s World Cup, they produced the greatest comeback in the tournament’s history to beat the All Blacks en route to the final.How distant those days now seem. The fortunes of the national team have never been so low in the professional era with France languishing eighth in the latest World Rugby rankings and in danger of being overtaken by Scotland and Fiji.Last year’s World Cup was a fiasco, culminating in the record 62-13 defeat to New Zealand, and while hosts England were also humiliated, they’ve bounced back in impressive style, winning the Grand Slam in the spring and last weekend defeating Australia with a superb performance.Close but no cigar: Edwill Van Der Merwe of South Africa U20 evades FranceFrance, in contrast, finished fifth in the Six Nations, edging past Italy and Ireland in Paris with two displays of shambolic tedium. An under-strength France play Argentina in Tucuman on Sunday in the first of two Tests that has them as the firm underdogs for the series. If the Pumas do win it will be further evidence of their status as the world’s No1 Latin team, their U20 side having recently beaten their French counterparts in the age-group World Championships. France’s failure to get out of their group – they were well-beaten by the Baby Boks on Wednesday night – added to the air of despondency that has pervaded the sport in France this season.Even the Top 14 feels depressed, and last weekend’s play-offs in which Racing 92 beat Toulouse and Montpellier out-muscled Castres were dismal adverts for what the French still like to call the ‘best league in the world’. Only Montpellier managed to score a try in the 160 minutes of rugby, and their three scores were hardly works of art.No wonder that the LNR launched a desperate publicity campaign at the start of this week to try and sell out Roazhon Park in Rennes, venue for this weekend’s Top 14 semi-finals. There are a variety of reasons why many tickets remain unsold, including the Euros, fear of terrorism and the fact Rennes is hundreds of miles from the heartlands of French rugby. Fishing for answers: Former France coach Marc Lievremont isn’t impressedBut might not the dread of watching 80 minutes of slow, sterile rugby also be a factor? Judging by many of the comments posted on the message boards of French rugby websites after the play-offs, the patience of fans is wearing thin.The mood was articulated in an interview this week with former France coach Marc Lievremont in which he said of the Top 14: “It’s our window, our soap opera…but all we end up with is aggression and violence, but little in the way of entertainment.”Lievremont got himself into a muddle when he attempted to apportion blame for the Top 14’s plight. At one point he fingered the usual suspects – foreign players and their quantity – but he was closer to nailing the real culprits when he declared: “The clubs don’t want to play offensive rugby but rather a calculated, minimalist, risk-free rugby. It’s then executed by superb players who create very little”.Heavy traffic: Bordeaux carry into contact against Clermont AuvergneExactly. Don’t blame the players, they are after all executing the game plan produced by their coaches. Bordeaux are a good example. In 2014-15 they scored 66 tries in 26 matches (second only to Toulon) but this season they managed just 44, the fourth fewest in the championship. “I don’t think it means we have less enterprise that previous seasons,” said Bordeaux scrum-half Baptiste Serin in March. “It’s that we’re more pragmatic. We’re approach matches in a more intelligent manner than before, with more thought.”Not that it did them much good. Bordeaux finished seventh this season, as they did in 2014-15, when at least they entertained along the way.center_img It’s wonderful that 39% of the French people voted rugby as their favourite team sport, but neither the FFR nor the LNR can afford to be complacent. Rugby fans want to be entertained; they want tries, ambition, action. They don’t want 80 minutes of arm-wrestling. But if that’s what they continue to see in the Top 14 then they’re likely to start voting with their feet.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more


Hotshot: Ospreys scrum-half Harri Morgan

June 23, 2021

vppeeukb

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img Fine nine: Harri Morgan scores for Wales U18 against Ireland. Photo: Huw Evans Agency Get to know Wales U18 scrum-half Harri Morgan We are separate from the first team but a few months ago he gave us some pointers on box-kicking.Is it hard to juggle the training with your studies? I’ve got one more year of A levels and it is hard, but the Ospreys and the school work with each other really well and most of my lessons fit around training. I want to go to uni next year to study something to do with sport.How did you enjoy the Wales U18 tour to South Africa? It was awesome, the best experience in my life so far.What are your strengths? I don’t mind the physical side and I also enjoy it when the game becomes unstructured.What do you need to work on? Making sure I’m accurate in every part of the game. Even if I’m getting tired, I need to focus on being accurate.And your goals this season? To play Premiership rugby for Bridgend Ravens and have some U20s involvement. TAGS: Ospreys LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Born 16 March 2000 Birthplace Maesteg Region Ospreys Country Wales Position Scrum-halfWhen did you get involved in rugby?I played for my district side, Maesteg, at about 11 and joined my local club, Maesteg Celtic, after that.Did you play any other sports when you were younger? Football. I was with Cardiff City for a few years, until U11s, and was a midfielder. It’s helped with the kicking side of rugby and my vision.Have you always played scrum-half? I started off on the wing or at full-back but my father encouraged me to go to scrum-half. I wasn’t one of the biggest and looking down the line it was the best position for me.What do you like about the position? I just like being involved all the time. You have involvements with every single play, get your hands on the ball, and are mixing it with the forwards and backs.Who is your rugby hero? Aaron Smith is a big one for me. He’s just so accurate in everything he does and he makes it look easy.How did you get involved with the Ospreys? I’d moved from Maesteg Celtic to Bryncethin and came into the Bridgend District for U15s. I got picked up at 15 by the Ospreys and have been in the academy since. I train there Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, with a Wednesday game. They have helped me a lot with my game.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREHave you done any work with Rhys Webb? RW Verdict: Already called into a Wales U20 training camp, this teenager is highly rated by his coaches and is expected to go far. He is comfortable alongside older players and is keen to learn from the world’s best, saying: “I watch rugby 24/7.”This article first appeared in the November 2017 issue of Rugby World.last_img read more


Episcopal Church launches new iPad app, ‘Wayfarer’

June 20, 2021

rcfvxfgk

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Office of Public Affairs Posted Feb 15, 2012 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI William Robison says: Betsy Jeffery says: February 18, 2012 at 10:35 am Hey is this the Bill Robison from Trinity Wauwatosa? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (5) February 16, 2012 at 7:29 am Wayfarer…means wanderer…completely perfect name for our wandering church Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 15, 2012 at 5:39 pm Hey folks, what a great idea. Downloading the first issue now, but how come there is no explicit mention of The Episcopal Church in the app description? Or when it loads? If we are producing this then our name should be on it. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Advocacy Peace & Justice, Bruce Green says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Dave Mitchel says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Michael Russell says: Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 15, 2012 at 5:21 pm Fabulous idea – looks to be a great thing. But why no availability for the iPhone too? Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church launches new iPad app, ‘Wayfarer’ First issue features the story of Kivalina, Alaska Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Episcopal Church Office of Communication has launched its first iPad app, Wayfarer.Available as a free, quarterly iPad app downloadable at iTunes, all the content can also be viewed in an Internet browser here.“Wayfarer features compelling stories told through video, photographs and words,” said Lynette Wilson, Wayfarer producer.Wilson, who is also an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service, addressed the appropriateness of the name. “We chose to name the app Wayfarer because we intend to tell a wide spectrum of stories about people, possibilities and action across a broad landscape,” she said.“This is an exciting moment – it represents our entry into mobile content, appealing both to Episcopal and broader audiences,” noted Anne Rudig, Director of Episcopal Church Office of Communication. “As the title suggests, each issue of Wayfarer has been shot in a different far-flung location.”KivalinaThe first issue is Kivalina, which chronicles the story of Indigenous Alaskans faced with having to move their entire village to higher ground because of rising sea temperatures.Wilson and two cinematographers, Cristina Valdivieso and Jon Connor, spent a week in Kivalina, AK, an island village some 80 miles above the Arctic Circle, reporting on and documenting the impact of climate change on this indigenous community.Kivalina unfolds over nine chapters, covering whaling, indigenous beliefs, village life and the village’s potential relocation.In the coming months, Wayfarer will release an issue on four Episcopal nuns, who had no previous farming experience and planted an organic garden in a move toward food self-sustainability.Wayfarer, along with Episcopal News Service, are part of the Episcopal Digital Network, a digital publication network that delivers news and feature stories to church leaders, members and general audiences.Follow on Twitter @WayfarerStoriesWayfarer: http://WayfarerStories.comiPad app: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wayfarer/id465079051?mt=8&ls=1Important note: The iPad app version of Wayfarer includes nine chapters of optimized high-definition video ranging in length from less than two minutes to just more than five minutes. The average download time is five minutes, but download times may vary based on the strength and speed of your WiFi connection and the number of people accessing WiFi through that connection. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 17, 2012 at 7:20 pm I need the iPhone app. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more


Children can grow in faith with Abundant Life curriculum at…

June 20, 2021

jgyicxwf

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Episcopal Relief & Development, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH General Convention 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA By Sharon SheridanPosted May 31, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Children can grow in faith with Abundant Life curriculum at convention Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group General Convention, Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Children, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Students at the Episcopal School of Knoxville display beans grown in their garden as part of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Abundant Life Garden Project curriculum, which will be used during the children’s program at General Convention in Indianapolis in July. Photo/Kelly Norrell[Episcopal News Service] While adult deputies and bishops conduct the business of General Convention this summer, the children gathered at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis will train to become mission ambassadors to their congregations back home.The Children’s Ministries of the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Indianapolis are partnering with the diocese’s Waycross Camp and Conference Center in Morgantown, Episcopal Relief & Development and National Episcopal Health Ministries to offer the children’s program for General Convention. Children from birth through fifth grade may participate from July 3-12, and may attend for all or part of the time depending on when they are at convention.The program will use Episcopal Relief & Development’s Abundant Life Garden Project curriculum.“One of the strengths of this curriculum is that a child can learn something just from a short time,” said agency formation consultant Cindy Coe, who developed the curriculum. Her 8-year-old son will attend the program at convention for four days.“Of course, if they attend for a longer time, it’s just that much deeper,” she said. “The purpose is to engage children in the work of Episcopal Relief & Development using images of the garden.”Children will once again have an area reserved for them to participate in worship services at General Convention. Photo/Paul HausmanThe children’s program is open during all committee and legislative sessions, but it’s not just child care, said Ruth-Ann Collins, Episcopal staff officer for lifelong Christian formation. “This is far from a babysitting experience. It’s a full faith-formation experience for children.”Program leaders want children to know, “Wow, we’re part of a bigger church than just our little church,” she said. “They get to meet kids from different parts of the country.”Participating children will attend the daily convention Eucharist. “They’re going to have their own spot up front so that they can see what’s going on and really feel like they’re included in it,” Collins said.They’ll also receive a behind-the-scenes tour of the worship space. “Some of these kids have probably never even been in a sacristy,” she said.In choosing the curriculum, Collins said, the thought was: “Let’s get these kids to be ambassadors.” The hope is that they’ll return home with their program “tool kits,” speak to their congregations or church leaders and perhaps demonstrate one of the projects.“It’s a real take-away,” she said. “Children can do mission and ministry, and that’s what we’re trying to show people.”The curriculum encompasses units on water, seeds, soil, animals and harvest, Coe said. Each of the five modules includes Old and New Testament lessons, a “story from the field” lesson and a meditation.“We can’t take children on an airplane and take them overseas and show them what Episcopal Relief & Development does, but we can show them in their own garden what we do overseas,” she said. By planting seeds and tending a garden, children “really do understand first-hand” what it’s like to have to grow your own food.In one of the program’s most successful activities, children walk 10 minutes to get a bucketful of water, Coe said.Children through fifth grade who attend General Convention can participate in their own faith-formation program. Photo/Paul Hausman“It starts out great, they go frolicking along,” she said. Children from the Episcopal School of Knoxville in Tennessee, for example, walked over a rough nature trail to a freshwater spring.“The problem is, they had to then walk uphill to get the water back to the garden. We always unwind that process, and they always say it’s fun. Then I say, ‘Would you like to have to do that every day?’ and they say, ‘No.’ They always come back with a wonderful appreciation of a fresh glass of water that they can get just by turning on the tap.”Overall, she said, program participants “come to an appreciation of things many of us take for granted.”The curriculum has been used with preschoolers through seminary students, in church schools and vacation Bible schools, and even overseas.At General Convention, the children will be divided into different age groups. During the program, they will visit the Waycross camp twice. Waycross counselors and counselors in training will be among the children’s program staff.“That’s a real intentional partnership, where we do leadership development for young people that are going to be camp counselors,” Collins said.National Episcopal Health Ministries was a natural connection for the program, Collins said. “We’re all trying to work to make children aware of good health, what it means to live a healthy life. They’re going to actually take our children on health walks” and will talk to them about healthy lifestyles.“We have our own chef, to make sure that they get nutritious food,” she said. And the program will have a nurse on staff.A student at the Episcopal School of Knoxville pours water on plants in the school’s garden, part of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Abundant Life Garden Project. The curriculum, which will be used during the children’s program at General Convention, teaches children to appreciate things like clean water that they normally take for granted in everyday life. Photo/Kelly NorrellBeyond serving the youngsters, Collins noted, “By having an intentional children’s program, it will help to make the opportunity to serve as a deputy more accessible to people with young children. … It allows someone of that age group to come and be part of the governance of the church without having the burden of, ‘Where do I leave my child for 10 days?’”“It also helps deputies who are grandparents and are the primary caregivers,” she said.Having the children at convention and present during worship, she said, “really is a visual way of reminding the General Convention floor of the future of the church. … What decisions we make today are impacting where the church will be for these young children as they grow up.”The children’s presence is a reminder to ask: “How are we being good stewards of the future?” she said.A registration form for the General Convention children’s program is available here. Cost is $65 per day, or $625 to $650 for all days, depending on the child’s age.The Abundant Life curriculum can be downloaded free here.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent.In Spanish: http://bit.ly/Lvxxcd Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more


South Carolinians say diocesan actions were ‘too far out of…

June 20, 2021

jigkvdfc

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img John Kirk says: Submit a Job Listing October 18, 2012 at 5:08 pm So the complaints of a few people and two priests out of thousands was enough for this complaint to go forward. No wonder the DoSC voted against the process. It reeks. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 23, 2012 at 8:13 pm Let us ask ourselves: “What would Jesus do?” David Yarbrough says: October 19, 2012 at 10:09 am Since moving to the Diocese (from England), it has been a pleasure and a relief to be under +Mark’s leadership. I’m sure I differ theologically from him in many ways, but he’s an excellent man and bishop, who is having action taken against him by a National Church which is comfortable with theosophical, Unitarian, and relativistic beliefs, but can’t seem to find a place for Evangelicals and other conservatives, whilst resorting to legislation and writ far too easily.I’m behind +Mark all the way on this one. Fr. Phillip Ayers says: Submit an Event Listing October 18, 2012 at 4:50 pm We all knew that Bishop Lawrence would be up to these kinds of shenanigans when he was showed his colors in the actions of the Bishop of the San Joaquin, John David Scofield, which was why he was elected Bishop of South Carolina. Leaving the Episcopal Church was part of the deal in the first place. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ October 24, 2012 at 2:58 pm The truth is that none of these people give a hoot about what Christ would do or say. TEC is a joke, a pathetic joke. They are the ones with the power and are using it like Bull Connor. What institution has a kangaroo court, double jeopardy, negotiates in bad faith, anonymous accusers, and trial in absentia? What kind of values are these? Face it. All these people in the Episcopal Forum care about is power. All the TEC cares about is power. They are a bunch of cowards. They are a joke. If you love Jesus, you will hear his voice and work towards peace. Jesus did not compromise. Nothing ticked Him off more than religious hypocrites. In fact, it was those guys who formed a kangaroo court and staged a mock trial against our Lord. The jokes is on you. Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 October 18, 2012 at 5:22 pm Please. This is an attempt to finally expel an orthodox Christian witness from the Episcopal Church as well as an attempt to steal a great deal of real estate that TEC will never be able to use again and will eventually have to sell to God only knows who. Any attempt to spin this as anything else is patently ridiculous. Press Release Service The Rev. Everett Lees says: Susan Thomas says: David Yarbrough says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME David Yarbrough says: Rector Albany, NY Comments (44) Christopher Cleveland says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY October 18, 2012 at 9:19 pm “There is definitely a place for orthodox and evangelical views within the diocese.”Those who filed the complaint don’t seem to appreciate the irony of this. God pour out His Grace on Bishop Lawrence and the orthodox under his care. May they make their way in sure certainty that they walk in the Light, toward the Light. Gloria Starns says: October 29, 2012 at 9:30 pm Bishop Lawrence (and Bishop Waldo) worked to try to find a means to create a space for dialogue. Katharine Jefferts Schori and the TEC staff slapped them down. Dr. John E. Waters says: October 20, 2012 at 12:39 am We should not forget that the TEC was born out of traditional Christian value fully compatible with the truth of the Bible. As a result Church increases many fold since its inception by Jesus Christ. History teaches uprooting roots does not bear good fruits.Recent doctrine changes under inclusion as publicized by TEC were made not to destroy traditional value of its entirety but to expand horizon of God’s love for entire human family. It sounds very good but sometimes it sounds too good to believe. Under present circumstances with exclusion of traditional believers by TEC it ensured that fear that all that glitters is not gold. The present circumstances show that the word inclusion has its boundary not because of trusting and believing the God TEC believes but because of its corporate laws. There is the catch 22 for present crisis, it implies that either you believe my way or leave my way. Under theology of inclusion, if there would have been godly love as preach, there would have way to accommodate them with change of corporate laws staying in core value to spread the Gospel of salvation for all mankind thru Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection, which both groups traditional and liberal have common value. (The Rev.) Stephen Alexander says: David Yarbrough says: John Kerrison says: October 19, 2012 at 3:12 am This seems a curious way to be “orthodox”! David Yarbrough says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID South Carolina October 20, 2012 at 12:36 pm May GOD grant them His wisdom to repent of their error. Christopher Johnson says: Comments are closed. Christopher Johnson says: October 20, 2012 at 1:45 pm Are you referring to the Diocese of South Carolina or ECUSA?Clearly ECUSA has lost sight of its Biblical mission and has turned into an agency of social progressivism, no different from the Unitarians and the United Church of Christ. October 19, 2012 at 11:50 am Susan,We were considering retirement in Charleston until this incident came to light, and like you, have decided that South Carolina is not a place we wish to spend what remains of our lives. Our Lord most certainly displayed righteous indignation from time to time–but I do not recall anywhere in the scriptures where he did so for the cause of bigotry. The Rev. Canon Will Mebane says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET October 23, 2012 at 7:26 pm I take him seriously, Christopher. What we’re dealing with is a Diocese that would rather self-destruct than submit their bishop to the discipline of the leadership of this church, the same discipline that all the other bishops are subject to. And all this because gay people are being made to feel too welcome. That’s not the glib makings of a leftist bumper sticker, it’s a huge theological problem, and the dispute he’s posing is simply this: a Diocese isn’t a martyr if it feels its blatant exclusion of others isn’t being respected on theological grounds. October 19, 2012 at 6:26 am Ms. McRae: If South Carolina’s diocesan convention, like Albany’s, is skewed toward conservative programs and speakers, it’s no wonder voters and votes lean hard right. Plenty of progressive folk just stay home. October 19, 2012 at 4:24 pm As a gay man who lives according to the virtues of the Christian religion i.e. chastity outside of marriage between one man and one woman, I fully support Bishop Mark for his robust and faithful support of the Faith even as it is destroyed by others from within. TEC is the least inclusive of all the mainline denominations. Liberals are the only ones welcome. Shame! Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Charlie Smith says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags October 20, 2012 at 12:58 pm The Church is called to uphold the Biblical principles of chastity outside marriage of one man and one woman, and it cannot with integrity deny those principles.I frequently compare the Church’s reaction to homosexuality and homosexual marriage to its reaction to those who don’t uphold and practice the Biblical principle of tithing – which hits a lot of people closer to home. The Church doesn’t react with ostracism and exclusion to these people – neither does it affirm their manner of living as worthy nor offer its blessing to those who operate outside Biblical principles.All have sinned and come short of the glory of God. God does not affirm us in our sins, but loves us in spite of them, and calls us to repentance and amendment of life. The Church doesn’t have the right to reverse that call. John Kerrison says: October 21, 2012 at 2:44 pm Here’s an idea, Charlie. How about you drop the leftist bumper stickers like “Jim Crow” and “states rights” and actually address the theological dispute here? Some of us might take you seriously if you do. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL October 19, 2012 at 8:41 am Well stated John, God bless…………………………….. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest David Yarbrough says: Thomas Andrew says: Featured Jobs & Calls nancy Golson says: October 21, 2012 at 7:05 pm This train wreck was entirely predicatble. The churchpeople of the South Carolina low country are not substantially different than those of Georgia, or North Carolina or any other southeastern state. What is different is the leadership. Some two decades ago a very conservative clique began monopolizing control over the apparati of that diocese and imposed a top-down authoritarian approach excluding all other viewpoints. They brought in Lawrence from the original breakaway diocese, San Joaquin. For years, SC put itself at direct odds with the structure and direction of the progressive-moving TEC. One should not feel sorry for Lawrence, but for his hundred clergy and 30,000 parishioners who are now being forced to choose between following him into the unknown beyond or staying with TEC. Unfortunately, he has shown no concen for them. He has projected onto them the delusion that the whole diocese can leave TEC intact, property and all. Thus, the real victims here are the faithful people of the diocese of South Carolina. There is a lot more grief ahead for all of them whatever happens with Lawrence. That will be his sad legacy in SC. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET October 29, 2012 at 9:03 pm Loving one another as Christ loves us requires the ability to speak the truth in love – not to ignore Biblical truth in order to achieve “inclusiveness”.Hospitality – “radical welcome” – does not involve turning our backs on God’s word but doubling down on proclaiming it, teaching it, and living it with integrity. Affirming the infinite value of all persons in the eyes of God doesn’t mean affirming every sinful behavior.And the Episcopal Church, like every other institution operated by sinful human beings, has no claim on “always being on the right side of history”. Whatever God has done through it is typically done in spite of its human agents.Maybe – just maybe – when TEC figures this out and starts to preach the entire word of God, the continual decline in the Church will end, and the Church can lead the way to the Third Enlightenment.That, Ms. Alford, is MY dream. Juan F. Perez, Jr. says: John Poynter says: October 18, 2012 at 8:17 pm The actions of this supposedly Christian denomination are truly shameful. The Gospel has been truly lost here. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Sam Chesnutt says: center_img October 21, 2012 at 2:40 pm So disagreement is bigotry? Good to know. Fr Bob Hector says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 18, 2012 Ronald J. Caldwell says: Hugh Magee says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ October 22, 2012 at 5:32 pm I just wonder if we have forgotten that Jesus faced the same ridicule that so called “liberals” are facing when he questioned the Law. If I recall, Jesus was about inclusion. Bringing those who where on the fringe to partake in the ever inclusive Love of God. If Bishop Lawrence was not in agreement with the TEC than he should have taken a lesson from Jesus and not try to severe ties but find a means to create a space for dialogue. October 18, 2012 at 6:53 pm I simply point to Bishop Dorsey Henderson’s comments, “It is also significant that Bishop Lawrence has repeatedly stated that he does not intend to lead the diocese out of The Episcopal Church—that he only seeks a safe place within the Church to live the Christian faith as that diocese perceives it.”When we say we are an inclusive church we don’t really mean it at times. A true inclusive church wants liberals and conservatives. We already live in a culture where we flock to people who look, act, vote, think like us…I guess my dream the church would be different than the culture is silly. October 20, 2012 at 9:11 pm BRAVO. About time. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA October 18, 2012 at 8:13 pm God bless our Bishop Lawrence and the members of the standing committee who follow the Biblical scriptures and are not lead astray by secular teachings. October 18, 2012 at 9:08 pm I now worship in Georgia because it became apparent that I needed to be a closet Episcopalian to remain a member of the Church of the Cross in Bluffton. I predicted that Chuck Owens had been ordained and placed in Bluffton by Bishop Salmon to take the congregation out of ECUSA shortly after his arrival and all of his “I will discern who may serve” instead of “congregation may choose from all who wish to serve” changes were implemented. Yes, there are many, many others who feel the same way as the Reverend Roger Smith,et al. May we all strive to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. Steve Caldwell says: October 25, 2012 at 11:36 am Secession was a bad idea in 1860 and it’s not any better in 2012. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Julian Malakar says: [Episcopal News Service – New Brunswick, New Jersey] The 12 lay people and two priests who filed complaints with the Episcopal Church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops alleging that the Diocese of South Carolina Bishop Mark Lawrence had abandoned the Episcopal Church said Oct. 18 that they filed those complaints “with great deliberation” because certain actions he and other diocesan leaders took “seemed to be going too far out of bounds.”Their statement came in a press release issued just after an attorney who worked with the 14 people had e-mailed a letter to Lawrence about their action. That letter, also e-mailed to Episcopal News Service, notes that they have made their names public “as a courtesy to you, so as not to have secrecy surrounding the action.”Melinda A. Lucka, an attorney in the Charleston, South Carolina, area and an active communicant in the diocese, said in the letter that the complainants “do not want possible misunderstandings” and stressed that no one from elsewhere in the Episcopal Church encouraged or initiated the complaint.”The 12 lay communicants include: Robert R. Black, Margaret A. Carpenter, Charles G. Carpenter, Frances L. Elmore, Eleanor Horres, John Kwist, Margaret S. Kwist, Barbara G. Mann, David W. Mann, Warren M. Mersereau, Dolores J. Miller, Robert B. Pinkerton, M. Jaquelin Simons, Mrs. Benjamin Bosworth Smith, John L. Wilder and Virginia C. Wilder. The clergy who were named are the Rev. Colton M. Smith and the Rev. Roger W. Smith.It was announced Oct. 17 that the disciplinary board had certified to Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori that Lawrence had indeed abandoned the Episcopal Church “by an open renunciation of the discipline of the church.”The diocese said in an Oct. 17 statement on its website that the board’s action “triggered two pre-existing corporate resolutions of the diocese, which simultaneously disaffiliated the diocese from the Episcopal Church and called a special convention.” That convention will be held Nov. 17 at St. Philip’s Church, Charleston.The disaffiliation resolution, passed by the diocesan Standing Committee on Sept. 18 is here.The church’s Executive Council discussed the South Carolina situation during a very brief executive session on the final day of its regularly scheduled meeting Oct. 15-18. Jefferts Schori said during a press conference just before the close of the meeting that she is “still hopeful that we can find a way for South Carolina to remain part of the Episcopal Church.”In their press release, the 14 people asked for prayers “for the bishop and all involved,” and stressed that “there is definitely a place for orthodox and evangelical views within the diocese; that’s the beauty of being under the large tent of the Episcopal Church.”“However, viewpoints and practices in the diocese began to take large leaps away from the broader church when various actions took place,” the complainants said. “Severing the legal connections to the governing laws of the church and essentially forming a new corporate entity, outside of the Episcopal Church by changing the diocesan corporate purpose statement to no longer accede to the constitution and canons of our church seemed to be going too far out of bounds.”“The hope of these individuals is that the diocese will continue to be a home for all Episcopalians to worship and live together in God’s love through Jesus Christ.”Lucka requested on behalf the 14 people that the disciplinary board look in various actions Lawrence had taken or encouraged over the past two years. She said in the release that she asked the board “if it could make a determination as to whether or not the actions were consistent with the mission and polity of the Episcopal Church.”Generally, names of individuals who initiate these requests are held in confidence through privacy provisions of the Episcopal Church’s canons, the release said. “However, the complainants in this request gave their approval to allow themselves to be made known to the bishop,” the release said, “as a courtesy to Bishop Lawrence, so as not to be cloaked in a shroud of secrecy.”The complainants hope that their disclosure “will prevent any suppositions that may be asserted in the upcoming days or weeks that the Episcopal Church may have initiated or encouraged the filing of this request,” the release said.The complainants said they also wanted to clarify that although most of them are members of the Episcopal Forum of South Carolina (an organization of what the release called “mainstream Episcopalians”), “this was not an action taken by the forum or its board.”“In addition to the individuals who made this request, there are many, many other loyal Episcopalians in the diocese who felt strongly that Episcopal Church officials should review the bishop’s actions,” the release said.ENS coverage of the Oct. 17 announcement is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Robert T. Dodd says: Comments navigation Newer comments Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events David Rowe says: October 24, 2012 at 7:13 am Sadly The Bishop has decided that we should not be “indiscriminately inclusive”. He is professing that we should be bigoted and reject certain member of society if they seek to worship with us. That is certainly NOT what TEC is about. Love others as Christ loved us. They say it every Sunday, but they don’t really mean it. The need to add “well except for this list of undesirables who don’t think, look or act like us”. The same argument was tried during slavery, women’s right to vote, civil rights and the admission of women and blacks as priests. TEC has always been on the right side of history and a leader in doing what is morally and legally right. Once again, someone is trying to keep us from doing that and being on the right side of history. I have a dream for that inclusive church too Rev Lees. I hope to live to see it in my lifetime. Other American Episcopalians can enjoy this, but not in the Eastern or Coastal Regions of SC. We are not all following Mark Lawrence, but sadly have no place to attend services so we practice our faith at home. Hopefully the courts and TEC will evict the non-Episcopalians from our properties and we can once again become completely inclusive and LOVE ONE ANOTHER AS CHRIST LOVED US. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 October 22, 2012 at 2:06 am Funny – I seem to remember that Father Mark Lawrence openly admitted that he had no desire to take SC out of TEC, which was the only reason that he was finally consented to by the Dioceses of the Episcopal Church to become the Bishop of SC. South Carolina has always been faithful to the Gospel as it has been passed down thru the ages (and was a founding member of the Episcopal Church) It has maintained the faith once delivered since before their was an Episcopal Church, and the majority of the diocese is just fine with that. Otherwise, they would have opposed and changes made at the last two conventions.This is the doing of a small minority of people in the diocese who have now forced this down the majorities throats. If the powers that be in TEC had really wanted to avoid this instead of making threats and rehashing complaints, they should have sat down with the Bishop in honesty. Instead, as usual, they smiled and talked nice, while plotting to bring down +Lawrence and make corrections to South Carolina’s faithful. TEC attacked the Bishop and the Godly people of South Carolina. And unlike other area’s of the country, this Diocese can leave TEC with their properties with the blessing of the South Carolina Supreme Court. I pray for you and your family Bishop Lawrence. God’s speed and hold the course, for the Holy Spirit will guide you correctly.Mark Nilsen Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Christopher Johnson says: Comments navigation Newer comments New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem thomas mauro says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA October 22, 2012 at 4:34 pm Why is it that conservative Episcopalians think that social progressivism, Unitarianism, and the United Church of Christ are “bad” labels they can stick on their opponents.Given the strong social justice and social progressivism stands taken in the Bible, it seems to me that being “an agency of social progressivism” would be very Biblical. After all, the Bible is full of very challenging social justice messges. “Blessed are the poor for theirs is the Kingdom of God” means in modern terms that any economic system where there is systemic injustice and economic exploitation that only the homeless and truely destitute are innocent. October 18, 2012 at 10:03 pm We were looking to buy a second home to become our retirement home in the greater Charleston area. As Episcopalians, we were dismayed to find such a schism in the area. We ended up buying our home in the Diocese of North Carolina to avoid these contentious issues. October 20, 2012 at 12:17 pm A few Sundays ago the reading from Numbers 11 was: “Would that all the LORD’s people were prophets, and that the LORD would put his spirit on them!” The job of the prophet is to make a prophetic community, not just to be a lone voice. In 2008 the Faith Communities Today survey took stock of the prophetic community called The Episcopal Church. It indicated that only 1/3 of the Church was considerably or somewhat liberal. However, the past 12 years of General Conventions has given deference and accommodation to the liberal and revisionist priorities that have been shaping our faith and practice. Why is it, then, that the faith community of the Episcopal Church so easily deferred to the divisive liberal minority who have been at the forefront of testing the patience and loyalty of the other 2/3? I think that if we believe that “all the people” can become prophets then let us examine their fruits. Liberal revisionist dioceses have been trending downward in numbers, closing their cathedrals, and relying on subsidies. The Executive Council just approved a $785,000 line of credit to maintain the small remains of the Diocese of San Joaquin – this after the majority of that prophetic community left over the divisive theological stands of a minority leadership in this Church. If we believe that the Lord forms the Church into prophetic communities then let us examine their fruits rather than be dismayed when patience has been tested past the breaking point. We have arrived at the new normal for the Episcopal Church. This Church has split. Pity that the 2008 Faith Communities Survey wasn’t taken more seriously. We might have avoided giving such deference to revisionism in the name of “prophetic witness”. We must not have believed that the Lord HAD formed a community and that it was already speaking. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Don Allen says: October 24, 2012 at 4:07 pm Scripture and the Church do preach tithing. It does not ostracise people who do not tithe. All sinners are welcome. I will leave their state of repentence to Jesus.The Episcopal Church does affirm homosexuality. Scipture does not. We orthodox Christians do not ostracise homosexuals. You might need to go to Iran if you want to see that.You needs to go backs to Sundays schools and brushes up. October 29, 2012 at 9:20 pm Mr. Kerrison, while the Church does not ostracize those who fall short of the standard of the tithe, it does not affirm and bless that state of life as worthy and compatible with Biblical Christianity.The Church affirms, and is moving rapidly to blessing, homosexuality as a worthy lifestyle compatible with Biblical Christianity. Scripture not only does not affirm homosexuality but proscribes it repeatedly.My point, which I have obviously failed to communicate, is that affirmation and welcome, and recognition of all persons as children of God, does not require denying the truth of God’s word or affirming sin – of whatever nature.And, as far as brushing up – my extensive Sunday School background (45 years tiimes 52 weeks of Baptist Sunday School, including summers and especially Easter Days) has been supplemented by extensive reading. (As a choir member, unfortunately my participation in Sunday School tends to be subverted by the universal desire of Episcopal choirmasters to rehearse during that hour).I commend to you a book called “Three Free Sins” by Dr. Steve Brown, seminary professor and broadcaster – even if you don’t agree with his viewpoint I believe you will find it refreshing. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS October 18, 2012 at 7:16 pm No doubt that the Episcopal Forum was behind these allegations. If they are so wanting to be open why only now admit as to who the complainants are? Why not after the first set of allegations? Only took them three tries to make the faux charges to stick. Hope they are happy now. God bless our godly bishop, The Right Rev. Mark Lawrence!Many, many other Episcopalians in the diocese who feel the same way? Doubtful. Look at the votes of the last couple of conventions- resolutions have passed with huge majorities! Maybe a handful – no more than a few percent of the diocese- would agree with the Forum’s actions. John Standard says: October 18, 2012 at 8:17 pm Gives thanks to G_D and prays for Robert R. Black, Margaret A. Carpenter, Charles G. Carpenter, Frances L. Elmore, Eleanor Horres, John Kwist, Margaret S. Kwist, Barbara G. Mann, David W. Mann, Warren M. Mersereau, Dolores J. Miller, Robert B. Pinkerton, M. Jaquelin Simons, Mrs. Benjamin Bosworth Smith, John L. Wilder and Virginia C. Wilder, the Rev. Colton M. Smith and the Rev. Roger W. Smith. May G_D grant them peace and courage. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Doug Desper says: Rector Belleville, IL South Carolinians say diocesan actions were ‘too far out of bounds’ Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI David Yarbrough says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 20, 2012 at 1:42 pm Diocesan conventions are meetings of the elected representatives of the parishes. While they aren’t held behind closed doors they aren’t “town hall” meetings. There’s been no attempt by SC parishes to abandon Diocesan Convention – nor, given the growth of the parishes in the Diocese, is there a wholesale exodus of parishioners.Mr. Dodd, this isn’t New York State, it’s low country South Carolina, one of the most conservative areas of the country, socially and theologically. Progressive folk are simply a tiny minority in this part of the country. October 19, 2012 at 5:59 pm I am heartbroken over this mess. In 1987 I spent a lovely three weeks in the Diocese of South Carolina, at Holy Savior Priory, Pineville, SC, when the brothers of the Order of the Holy Cross were there. It has since closed and the property sold to private enterprise. When I had a few hours between flights, I journeyed into downtown Charleston for a wonderful look at St. Michael’s and St. Philip’s churches. I have many friends from SC as well, including aformer seminary professor who has retired there.I try to weigh all the arguments and have great difficulty in doing so. I guess my prediction that “South Carolina will be next [after San Joaquin, Quincy, Fort Worth and Pittsburgh] to go” is coming true. Yes, there IS room in the Episcopal Church for all sorts and conditions of theological views, liturgical practices, ways of “doing and being Church” – but the bottom line, it seems to me, is the Church’s dedication to worship its Lord and to justice and mercy. Justice and mercy are incarnated in our being inclusive of all. And, yes, that includes conservatives and those who claim to be orthodox. I would invite such to consider, or re-consider, their definition of justice and mercy before they decide to bolt from the Episcopal Church. On the other hand, I do not appreciate the seeming heavy-handedness in the way some of these situations have been handled; but I have every confidence in Bishop Katherine and her staff and advisers to handle the situations amicably and for the greater good of Christ and His Church, His Body. Cannot something like what the Diocese of Kansas did with a “cardinal parish” that left be a model? I believe that entailed the parish paying the diocese for its building; much litigation was avoided as well.As Bread is broken at the Fraction of the Mass, so we are broken. I pray for healing and reconciliation all around us in these times. Meanwhile, let’s get on with worshiping in spirit and in truth, serving the poor, welcoming the stranger to our midst, and being the Body of Christ!Phillip Ayers Mark Nilsen says: Carol McRee says: October 19, 2012 at 9:44 am Why is it that we have such a hard time naming what this is all about. It’s about a diocese that believes it has a God given right to ostracize and exclude church-going gay people. It has never been about anything else. The split started at least 14 years ago when this diocese codified for itself the non-binding Lambeth resolutions of 1998. The leadership of this diocese, rather than being honest about what it opposed, reached back to it’s Jim Crow past and developed an entire lexicon of homophobic code words to use in defense of their defensless policies. I can assure you that in the diocese of SC the word “Orthodoxy” is to gay and lesbian Christians what the words “States Rights” are to African Americans. It is past time to bring this conversation back to what it’s about. Let’s stop using code words and smoke screens. And while everybody is praying for the former bishop, how about including a prayer or two for the thousands of churchgoing gay and lesbian Christians in my diocese who have felt like bastards at the family reunion for decades. Rebecca Alford says: Fr. Michael Neal says: October 18, 2012 at 4:52 pm Congratulations to Bishop Mark Lawrence for his character and the strength of his Biblical convictions. Many of our ancestors who came to South Carolina were Anglican – though current families may be associated differently now. As such, many of us still feel connected through our religious Anglican roots. Historically, South Carolinians have born political and spiritual heros who were brave and as willing to go against the tide of tyranny as they were against error in biblical praxis. Mark Lawrence is such a man. When men fail to speaks up, matters of faith and doctrine drift from orthodoxy allowing the barnacles of easy believism to alter the course of the church of Jesus Christ. Keep the course, Bishop Lawrence, and thank you. Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more


TREC issues a letter to The Episcopal Church suggesting changes

June 20, 2021

wlmtxkfy

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,


first_img General Convention 2015, General Convention, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ David Chee (Rev. Canon) says: September 24, 2014 at 10:20 am I agree. Getting rid of the provincial representatives is a mistake. If you need to cut down the size, get rid of the at large members instead. The proposed change will just result in a further consolidation of power into the hands of GenCon leadership. It will also take away one of the few actual reasons for having a provincial meeting. Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Structure, September 5, 2014 at 1:24 am They lost me with the Lazarus quote. Seriously. If their messaging is they’re here to save a “dead church” then I’m not their girl.I promise I’ll read the whole thing later “for comprehension.” But right now I’m too busy gearing up for a program year with 100 congregational dinners happening throughout the community, over 80 acolytes to train, five children and youth choirs doing signups on Sunday and Homecoming Sunday next week … where we’ll have a video stream into the overflow room for the people who won’t fit into our 900 seat church at 9 or 11:15.Everything can be improved. Even the Episcopal Church. But in my corner of the kingdom we are FAR from “DOA.”The Reverend Canon Susan RussellAll Saints Church, PasadenaDiocese of Los Angeles Douglas M. Carpenter says: Submit an Event Listing September 4, 2014 at 10:02 pm Glad it’s not just me–just give the bullet specifics, please! How many lengthy meetings went into this? I respect the effort, but still have in idea what real changes are being recommended. And the grammar….”Neither IS….” not “Neither are!” Sigh. How about just outfitting church bathrooms with stools for kids to wash hands, changing tables in all bathrooms, young family-friendly basics? A sense of fun and meeting people where they are in their everyday lives? This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 September 4, 2014 at 9:02 pm I found this way too long and convoluted. Need some editing, We need more than anything some bold leadership- a “Pope Francis” who I, even tho an avowed Epsicopalian, will boldly speak out on really important issues, Not a peep out of our Presiding Bishop, she is way too corporate, and does not elicit the type of leadership that garners headlines, “Working quietly behind the scenes” is a bunch of baloney- we need BOLD statements from our leaders and REAL leadership, not just careful bureaucrats and politicians, Douglas M. Carpenter says: September 5, 2014 at 10:47 am That’s the bottom line, yes. Tending the flock and those who tend, Jim Murdock says: Ted Chase says: Cathy Cox says: Rector Knoxville, TN John McCann says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 4, 2014 at 4:53 pm This is important work for the future of the Church and it appears you are on the right track. Thank you for all the time and talent you are giving to the job before you. My prayer is that the next convention will take your suggestions for significant change and not only approve but make sure that we follow-through with the necessary changes. Our corporate weakness has always been to approve a change by resolution at General Convention, but not making sure the necessary work takes place after the convention adjourns. Scott Johnson says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN September 6, 2014 at 3:34 pm The report gives the impression there are no people on the committee who are experiencing the Episcopal Church in parishes that are very much alive. Let’s learn from these parishes. September 4, 2014 at 4:21 pm It is ironic, to me, that TREC has chosen to invoke the story of Lazarus — for, from what I can read of their proposals, the gist of it seems to be “kill off TEC, then hope that Jesus will raise it again.” Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tamika Caston-Miller says: September 4, 2014 at 9:52 pm The Conclusion and the Prayer for Continued Work are the only readable and coherent parts of the report. I pray the Holy Spirit can forge through the BOMFOG and bring some simple understandable suggestions. Frank Bergen says: September 5, 2014 at 12:59 am As a non-stipendiary clergywoman (deacon), I hold down a secular job five days a week and deal with the corporate world. I am bothered that some of the ideas come straight from the corporate mindset and tradition – it doesn’t always work. Our Presiding Bishop is a bishop, not a CEO. Do we really have to go the corporate route? Dale Osborn Rains says: Tags Gary Goldacker says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 September 4, 2014 at 9:16 pm Ditto Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Jeff Douglas says: September 8, 2014 at 10:20 pm Amen. Reads like a bunch of consultants from Accenture wrote it, rather than churchfolk. Applaud the sincere work and time spent, but sometimes the medium is the message. Christopher Myers says: Comments navigation Newer comments Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs September 4, 2014 at 7:24 pm Sounds like rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic. The church does not need more “program”, rather conversion. No mention of the need for repentance, greater faith in Jesus or in living the Holy Gospel. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Frederick Rivers says: Tom Fitzhugh says: James Manuel says: Rector Smithfield, NC Douglas M. Carpenter says: Don Plummer says: [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The Taskforce for Reimagining The Episcopal Church (TREC) has issued A Word To The Episcopal Church.TREC Letter to the Church: September, 2014Jesus cried with a loud voice, “Lazarus, come out!”  The dead man came out, his hands and feet bound with bandages, and his face wrapped with a cloth.  Jesus said to them, “Unbind him, and let him go.”                                                                                                                                                               (John 11:43–44)As the Taskforce for Reimagining The Episcopal Church (TREC) has progressed in our work, we have come to see the raising and unbinding of Lazarus as a helpful way of understanding this moment in the life of The Episcopal Church. We believe Jesus is calling our church to new life and vitality, but the church is held back by its bindings—old ways of working that no longer serve us well.We write this as we begin the final months of our work, to give you an update about our thinking and emerging recommendations for your prayerful consideration and feedback. We will publish our final report and specific legislative proposals in December 2014.In the 18 months since we first met as a Task Force, we have been in conversation with many of you—in person and virtually—about your hopes, dreams, ideas, and concerns for the church and about our collective mission to serve Christ. We have appreciated your feedback, your encouragement, and your criticism of our work so far. We look to continue our dialogue with you in the months to come and encourage you to respond to this letter, to participate in our virtual town hall meeting that we will webcast from Washington National Cathedral on October 2, and to engage in dialogue with us as we join provincial meetings and other forums. We thank you for your input to date and for your prayers for our work together.The Need for ChangeThe Episcopal Church’s structures and governance processes reflect assumptions from previous eras that do not always fit with today’s contexts. They have not adapted to the rapidly changing cultural, political, and social environments in which we live.  The churchwide structures and governance processes are too disconnected from local needs and too often play a “gating” or regulatory role to local innovation. They are often too slow and confusing to deal decisively with tough and urgent tradeoffs or to pursue bold directions that must be set at the churchwide level.Our study and observations would suggest, for example, that:■             General Convention has historically been most effective in deliberatively discerning and evolving the church’s position on large-scale issues (e.g., prayer book revision, reform of clergy formation and discipline canons, women’s ordination, same sex blessings). This should continue to be the primary role of General Convention.■             However, General Convention is not organized to drive clear prioritization of resourcing; address technical issues; set a clear agenda for churchwide staff; launch bold programs of innovation or reform; or ensure accountability for effective and efficient execution by the churchwide staff. At the churchwide level, we lack the ability to focus on the priorities that are most urgent at the local level, where much if not most of our primary mission and ministry take place.■             Neither the Executive Council nor the Presiding Bishop’s office are fully effective in complementing the General Convention by making tough tradeoffs, setting bold direction, or driving accountability of churchwide staff to local needs. The roles of the Executive Council and the Presiding Bishop’s office are often ambiguous and unclear, and neither are structured, selected, or sized appropriately for their tasks in governance and execution. As a result, churchwide staff report significant confusion as to who sets direction. Power struggles emerge, with all factions claiming alignment with General Convention resolutions, and conflicts are resolved through churn and delay, rather than through clear analysis and accountable authority. We have not demonstrated the capacity at the churchwide level to develop the kind of strategic focus that allows us to address some of our highest and most pressing priorities.■             Churchwide staff functions have evolved their roles and mindsets to be increasingly responsive and supportive of local mission, but their purpose and scope are not clear and broadly understood across the church. Highly skilled people and well-developed programs are underutilized because local groups do not know they exist.  In other situations, dioceses report frustration that churchwide programs are not responsive or adequate to meet their local needs. There are not sufficient systems of transparency around how churchwide resources are used or held accountable for their effectiveness and resource stewardship.A New ParadigmWe live in an age of networks, yet our churchwide structure has not fully adapted to this organizational paradigm. The evolution from a bureaucratic/regulatory agency paradigm to a network will profoundly change the role, culture, decision making processes, and leadership paradigms of and within The Episcopal Church’s churchwide structures. This would not be unlike other significant evolutions that have occurred historically around our church’s governance and structures.We have previously written about the historical evolution of churchwide structural paradigms and described four clear roles that we recommend for the 21st century:■             Catalyst: The Episcopal churchwide organization should inspire and provoke all members of the church to live fully into its mission of “restoring all people to unity with God and one another in Christ” (Book of Common Prayer, p. 855).–    Specific examples of what the churchwide structure must and should do to fulfill this role would include inspiring and calling the whole church to baptismal ministry and helping every member interpret the world through the eyes of the gospel, including exercising a prophetic voice on social justice issues and representing the voices of marginalized people.■             Connector: The churchwide organization should establish and maintain relationships among its member communities and constituents in order to cultivate Episcopal identity, to magnify the mission impact of local communities by connecting them to each other, and to facilitate the sharing of ideas and learning across the Episcopal and broader Anglican networks.–    Specific examples of what the churchwide structure must and should do to fulfill this role would include representing The Episcopal Church in the Anglican Communion; forging ecumenical relationships and alliances; exercising canonical authority to foster and preserve the church’s catholicity (unity in diversity with the wider Christian Church); maintaining the church’s institutional history through the Church Archives; and fostering communication across the church around new ideas, learning, and opportunities for collaboration.■             Capability Builder: The Episcopal churchwide organization should support leadership development centered around the critical skills necessary for individual and communitywide Christian formation in 21st century contexts. The Episcopal churchwide organization should also ensure that the church is a learning organization—rapidly learning from successes and failures across the church and rapidly sharing these lessons across the church’s network. Key capabilities needed in today’s missionary context include skills in ministry, community organization, reviving congregations, planting congregations, multicultural leadership, evangelism, Christian formation, reaching new generations, and reaching new populations. The expertise in these areas lies primarily at the grassroots level, but the churchwide structure can foster mutual learning, especially on a peer-to-peer basis.–    Specific examples of what the churchwide structure must and should do to fulfill this role would include cultivating and fostering the sharing of expertise for targeted training and professional development.■             Convenor: The Episcopal churchwide organization should assemble the church in traditional and non-traditional ways as a missionary convocation. The Episcopal churchwide organization should also convene the church with the broader Anglican Communion, with ecumenical church partners, and with other potential partners and collaborators in proclaiming Christ’s gospel and living the Five Marks of Mission.[1]–    Specific examples of what the churchwide structure must and should do to fulfill this role would include convening a General Missionary Convocation both in person and virtually, potentially concurrent with General Convention.Implications for Existing Churchwide StructuresTo begin to change the church’s operating paradigm in the ways that we believe will be necessary, we have identified several “critical path” priorities and have worked to more fully develop them. We have concluded these areas are in the most need of our attention if we are to make the church work more effectively in our 21st century context.  These changes will not fully transition the churchwide structures and governance to the network-based model that we describe above. The work of reimagining our church and restructuring the church’s institution will need to be an ongoing process of adaptation as our context continues to shift and change. Taken together, however, we believe addressing these areas constitute a critical first step and will enable further change. We must streamline and focus  the scope of our churchwide agenda, to become a more distributive, networked, and nimble church that is focused on local faith formation and local mission and that enables and accelerates local innovation and adaptation; while at the same time enhancing, not diminishing our prophetic voice to the world around us.■             At the churchwide level, we must select and fully empower clear and effective leadership to define agendas, set direction, develop expertise around complex issues and their implications, make tough choices, and pursue bold and disruptive ideas where appropriate. There are implications for the General Convention, for the Executive Council, the central executive function of the church, and for General Convention’s Commissions, Councils, Agencies, and Boards (CCABs).■             Once the direction is set for the work necessary at the churchwide level, we must empower a lean churchwide staff to build capacity across our church and act as network catalysts and network builders. This staff must be directed and supervised by professionals with deep and relevant expertise and experience in the areas that are the focus of their respective projects. The scope of mission-related staff work should be specific and time-bound (see “Developing Recommendations” below).■             We must create accountability in our churchwide structure so that we are able to measure whether that structure is following the direction that has been set, ensuring a high quality of work, and driving efficiency. For churchwide staff, this means that objectives must be set at the start of any project or endeavor with basic, guiding metrics that are tracked and reported.We believe that addressing these priorities will enable the church to continue to evolve and streamline its governance and structures in areas that we have not addressed.  We also believe that addressing these priorities will enable the church to be more effective in addressing its most complex and urgent issues where deep study and bold action is required (e.g., sustainability of stipendiary clergy; implications for clergy education and pension structures).Developing RecommendationsThe recommendations that we will submit to the church and to the 2015 General Convention will likely take several different forms:1.            A complementary set of resolutions that suggest amendments to the Canons and Constitution in order to implement what the Task Force considers “critical path” changes to churchwide structures, governance, and administration. We will strongly recommend that these resolutions be implemented as a total package.2.            Draft resolutions for further streamlining of churchwide structures and governance that our work tells us represent the wishes of a large segment of church members and that we believe should be debated and resolved in the 2015 General Convention.3.            A recommended agenda of serious and deep issues on which our church must take urgent action in order to be as bold, adaptive, and resilient as it needs to be over the coming decades, plus an illustration of how this agenda would be effectively and efficiently informed and progressed if our legislative recommendations were adopted.4.            More specifically, the “critical path” proposals we are considering putting forward in the form of General Convention resolutions calling for amendments to the Canons and Constitution currently include:■             Improvements to the effectiveness of the General Convention, e.g.:–    Limits to the overall length of the General Convention and efforts to focus and prioritize its legislative agenda.–    Reduction in the number of legislative committees for General Convention–    Express permission for legislative committees to let resolutions die in committee–    The evolution of General Convention to become a General Missionary Convocation of the Church, with networking and sharing around mission and ministries its primary focus, and hopefully reducing the scope and size of legislation and both legislative bodies, while still increasing overall participation and relevance to mission at the local level.■             Clarifications around the role of the central executive structures of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS)–    Presiding Bishop retained as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Church, Chair of the Executive Council, and President of DFMS, with managerial responsibility for all DFMS staff–    President of the House of Deputies (PHoD) retained as Vice President of the Church, Vice Chair of the Executive Council, and Vice President of DFMS–    Presiding Bishop responsible for nominating three people to serve in the following offices, with concurrence by the PHoD:  Chief Operating Officer (COO), Treasurer/Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Chief Legal Officer. These positions would serve at the pleasure of the Presiding Bishop.  Approval for the Presiding Bishop to fire any of these officers would not be required from the PHoD or the Executive Council.■             Changes to the role, size, and selection of the Executive Council–    The role of the Executive Council clarified as a “governance” role, similar to a non-profit Board of Trustees–    Size of the Executive Council reduced from 40 to 21 members (retaining proportionality among the orders) to improve its effectiveness as a Board–    Executive Council membership to include the Presiding Bishop, the President of the House of Deputies as ex officio voting members, and the COO, Treasurer/CFO and Secretary as non-voting members, plus 20 members elected “at large” rather than as representatives of each province■             Reduction in the number of CCABs and their scope–    Elimination of all Standing Commissions except the Joint Standing Committees on Nominations and Program, and Budget & Finance–    Charging the presiding officers to appoint such task forces as might be necessary to carry out the work of a General Convention on a triennium by triennium basis.■             A transition in the mission or program-related staff of DFMS to a primarily contractor-only model–    Contractors to be hired based on a specific project scope, length, and set of objectives–    Project effectiveness to be monitored by the Presiding Bishop’s office and reviewed annually by Executive Council against a set of pre-agreed metricsStaff in “support functions” like Human Resources, Finance, IT, Legal, Communications, or Archives would not be impactedIn our final report, we will illustrate how these recommended changes would help The Episcopal Church to more effectively and efficiently address critical and urgent agenda items, with the flexibility to innovate and experiment more rapidly and to adopt bold courses of action where necessary.In the course of our work as a Task Force, we have identified and are continuing to develop a set of agenda items that we believe must be addressed by The Church in coming years. These agenda items include:■             Building capacity and capability across the Church around evangelism, community leadership, and non-traditional parish formation■             The sustainability of a fully stipendiary clergy model and the likely predominance of mixed models of employment and clergy leadership■             Implications for seminary education, requirements, and debt burden■             Opportunities for Pension Fund policy changes to improve clergy and lay leadership incentive alignment■             Diocesan viability, the number of dioceses, and assessment requirements/expectations■             Parish viability, the number and geographic distribution of parishes, and fostering new church plantsWe believe that addressing these types of issues will require strong, inspired and accountable leadership, informed input, and, in some cases, quick action. With the changes we have recommended in churchwide structures, governance, and administration, we see these issues being addressed as follows:■             The General Convention would call for these issues to be part of the DFMS agenda, to be directed by the Presiding Bishop’s office and accountable to the Executive Council and to subsequent General Conventions■             The Presiding Bishop’s office (most likely through the COO) would identify the expertise and type of resources required to effectively study these issues and to develop recommendations. The Presiding Bishop’s office, in consultation with the Executive Council, would charter time-bound projects with specific objectives and metrics, and it would hire qualified contractors and establish advisory boards as necessary. The Presiding Bishop’s office would direct these projects and the people hired to accomplish them.■             The Executive Council would review and provide appropriate oversight of DFMS’s total portfolio of projects relative to pre-established metrics on an annual basis.ConclusionIt is important to state clearly and emphatically that the work of innovation and adaptation is already underway at all levels of the church. It is clear that with or without the General Convention, with or without any recommendations from TREC, the re-imagining of our Church is already and will continue to take place. The Holy Spirit has breathed new life into the Church at countless times and in countless ways in the past, and the same Spirit will continue to do so in the future. Our hope is that our recommendations will ultimately help focus and direct the extraordinary spiritual, human, and material resources God has entrusted to us toward a clear set of priorities that will help us be most faithful and effective in continuing to participate in God’s mission in the world.A Prayer for Our Continued WorkHoly Spirit, who broods over the world, fill the hearts and minds of your servants on the Taskforce for Reimagining The Episcopal Church with wisdom, clarity, and courage.  Work in them as they examine and recommend reforms for the structure, governance, and administration of this branch of the one holy catholic and apostolic Church. Help them propose reforms to more effectively proclaim by word and example the Good News of God in Christ, to challenge the world to seek and serve Christ in all persons—loving our neighbors as ourselves—and to be a blazing light for the kind of justice and peace that leads to all people respecting the dignity of every other human being. Be with The Episcopal Church that we may be open to the challenges that this Taskforce will bring to us, and help the whole church to discern your will for our future. In the name of Jesus Christ our Mediator, on whose life this Church was founded.  AMEN__________________________________[1] To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom. To teach, baptize and nurture new believers. To respond to human need by loving service. To seek to transform unjust structures of society, to challenge violence of every kind and to pursue peace and reconciliation. To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.________________________________________For more info, questions or comments, contact TREC members at [email protected] plans a churchwide meeting on October 2. Details are available here. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY September 4, 2014 at 11:07 pm In spite of the mentioning of networking and the Holy Spirit, the bulk of this seems (at first sight) to lie in the centralizing of power around the Presiding Bishop. Won’t this lead to a loss of diversity and the imposition of a single point of view? Where is there any mention of prayer and deepening the spirituality of the church so that the Holy Spirit can act more creatively? Posted Sep 4, 2014 Len Freeman says: Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Rev. John Donnelly says: September 4, 2014 at 5:42 pm I pray that the people of The Episcopal Church, especially General Convention deputations, Standing Committees, and Executive Council, will read, digest, and dialogue about this report and offer additional thoughts about the reimagining of the church. I also pray that we will be faithful stewards of all the gifts given to the church, including the love and labor of our staff at various levels, and make any changes with both thought and care. Robert Walker says: September 4, 2014 at 5:50 pm Very sermonic and filled with executive consultant jargon. You don’t define your acronyms and assume that those in the pews know them. They don’t. However, it seems to be an attempt to raze the bureaucracy and refocus the Church on mission which is commendable. I do worry about adopting the corporate board model with the CEO, CFO and CLO (all endowed in this proposal with greater power to determine the direction of the church) at a time when corporate structures and top-down thinking allow for less bubbling up from those on the front lines, the missionaries, planters, parishioners and priests. Lip service is given to networking but until it is a reality, I don’t think the sense that the national church has little connection to the daily spiritual lives of those in the pews will change. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA September 4, 2014 at 6:16 pm Ah, yes! And something needs to be done about this report’s reliance on a significant amount of organizational-technocrat, insider jargon that is at least as difficult for many committed church members to read, mark, learn and inwardly digest as the recently vilified terms, Eucharist, coadjutor and diocese, are for outside observers! September 4, 2014 at 4:34 pm This shows real thoughtfulness, courage and wisdom. The Spirit has been with you…. and may it continue with all of us as these processes move forward.Blessings Comments (63) Shirley Banks says: September 5, 2014 at 3:51 pm Some very thoughtful analysis on the national church. However, I wonder if the change we need is more local? One faithful Episcopalian once said, “Revive your church, beginning with me.” Maybe the problem is not policy, but love. Do we really love the lost people who do not know the love of Christ? If I did, then I would spend more energy, time, and money in tryng to reach them through the power of the Holy Spirit. God bless. Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rev. Ellen Ekstrom says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Daphne Hedges says: September 4, 2014 at 9:46 pm More power to the TREC! May the Holy Spirit guide each and every one of you, much wisdom, greater knowledge ,coupled with a sound mind and body, so that you can come out with a good recommendations , for the good of our beloved Church, and more importantly, for the glory of God. Sarah Williams says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release September 5, 2014 at 12:34 am I believe the reference alludes to the TEC being dead in its boldness and needs a resurrection. At least, that’s what it means to me. September 4, 2014 at 7:01 pm What you have proposed is generally good. However, I was hoping for a lot more specificity. Perhaps, I hope, that will come. Susan Russell says: Livingston Prescott Humboldt IV says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Dorothy Leland says: September 5, 2014 at 12:22 pm Bingo! Tune in on the 2nd, Ellen. There’s a lot in the TREC report about catalysts for mission and prophetic voices. This is the deacon’s identity, and if you add in nonstipendiary, I personally am of the mind that it is possible that the deacons are pre-adapted to help the church do this. My line is: deacons have been making gold from straw for 40 years! Rector Belleville, IL September 4, 2014 at 4:39 pm Brilliant and insightful. Praying for success in your efforts. There will be strong push back from everyone who has special interests, but the tenor of this report and the fact that it clearly states who needs to do what is absolutely wonderful. A huge, fresh wind! Press Release Service Lelanda Lee says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET September 4, 2014 at 9:45 pm A good first draft for setting the scene and identifying some of the characters, with just enough plot to keep me paying attention. As someone ordained during the struggle for a new prayer book and hymnal, the role of women, minorities, LGBT persons in the full ministry of the Church and development of important justice ministries, I feel like I am part of a whole new era for us as the Church. I look forward to our future and thank TREC for it’s exciting work. Prayers for your continuing faithfulness to the Gospel. Featured Events September 4, 2014 at 7:57 pm While Lazarus as dead seems odd to describe us (the church) at any point in time whether past or present, to rekindle life in those parts of Lazarus (us) that have died or fallen asleep seem appropriate, so that we can experience a whole Lazarus resurrection or resuscitation, with the words of Jesus setting the tune: let the resurrected Lazarus be “unbound and set free”. Having been on Executive Council but basically one who worked at grass-root level, I congratulate the task force for its great insights and extremely good work. I look forward to reading its final report, but can now already start to imagine all the good things that can happen as we continue to move ahead in the 21st. century. Donald Graves says: September 5, 2014 at 12:50 am Brilliant analysis! … A hearty “Amen” for this preliminary effort headed in the right direction. I do agree it is good in general but lacks being specific on vital issues of the existing structure of the American Episcopal Church and needed changes in line with … ” we have come to see the raising and unbinding of Lazarus as a helpful way of understanding this moment in the life of The Episcopal Church. We believe Jesus is calling our church to new life and vitality, but the church is held back by its bindings—old ways of working that no longer serve us well. … The Need for Change The Episcopal Church’s structures and governance processes reflect assumptions from previous eras that do not always fit with today’s contexts. They have not adapted to the rapidly changing cultural, political, and social environments in which we live.” Curate Diocese of Nebraska September 4, 2014 at 10:47 pm I am pleased with the idea of this group working to improve our church. However, when we need to encourage people to be involved with the church, why do we want to limit participation? To have the Executive Committee elected at large rather than having representation from each province seems to me a mistake. Surely there are people in each of our provinces who would be suitable for the task of serving on this committee. I have no office, am not ordained, but feel a need to speak my mind on this one thing. I hope you will reconsider. Dorothy Leland Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest September 5, 2014 at 10:25 am Agree with Dorothy. Sounds like a way to establish a selected group to follow the selecters’ wishes.That is one of the few specific, “non-technojargon” phrases. I have to agree with the criticisms of the language. Really! September 4, 2014 at 11:33 pm ” A transition in the mission or program-related staff of DFMS to a primarily contractor-only model– Contractors to be hired based on a specific project scope, length, and set of objectives”A primarily contractor-only model? Which is it? Primarily contractors or only contractors?“The sustainability of a fully stipendiary clergy model and the likely predominance of mixed models of employment and clergy leadership”Outsourcing DFMS program work and wanting priests to work part-time is a way to avoid paying benefits. As health insurance companies, big pharma, and some types of hospitals have record profits, health care remains simply too expensive for many Americans, especially those of us who are under-employed. Like it or not, having a full-time job remains the only viable means of access to health care. Really, are we OK with depriving our ministers of health insurance and pensions? Do we think they will have another part-time job that offers benefits (nope), or a wealthy spouse, or a trust fund? New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books September 4, 2014 at 9:51 pm So much gobbledygook it seems to this retired English teacher and editor. Get to the point, if you have one. All this technobabble jargon is meaningless. Sounds like something a consultant would get big bucks for cutting and pasting. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA September 4, 2014 at 8:42 pm This reminds me of a writing course I once took. The main criticism came like this: “Please rewrite this in half the words.” – Doug Carpenter Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bob Boyd says: nancy sargent says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York September 10, 2014 at 9:41 pm John McCann hit the nail on the head. This document is mind-numbing and verbose with little attention paid to specificity on important issues that all too often get steam-rolled by the latest fad of “mission-speak” that makes my eyes glaze over. He’s absolutely correct about the ineffectiveness of so-called “working quietly behind the scenes” – unadulterated baloney. We must do better in our selection of the next Presiding Bishop if we don’t want the next Presiding Bishop to be the last Presiding Bishop. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Harold L Carter says: Rector Washington, DC September 5, 2014 at 11:38 am Totally agree John McCann – and this whole TREC document is sleep-inducing. Someone earlier wrote that we seem to be urging mission without any idea what that might mean – Unless it is God’s mission undertaken by God’s converted people there isn’t any, no matter how expertly managed. September 5, 2014 at 2:02 pm I agree with Rev. Susan. Our focus at the local level is on the kinds of things she outlined. As one in the pews not in church leadership, I couldn’t find anything in the very church-speak written report that relates to parishes. At some point any redesign of the church will need the buy in of parishioners. I’m not sure TREC has laid out for us in the pews a detailed case for the why such changes are needed in the first place let alone why we should adopt their suggestions. More groundwork is needed I think. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing TREC issues a letter to The Episcopal Church suggesting changes Featured Jobs & Calls September 4, 2014 at 8:46 pm After a lengthy sermon, our homiletics professor would often say. “Now, please tell us what you were trying to say.” Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY James David Walley says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments navigation Newer comments The Rev’d Anthony C. Dinoto says: September 4, 2014 at 9:25 pm agree Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Sarah Williams says: Lorraine Mills-Curran says: September 17, 2014 at 12:41 pm Criticism of the Presiding Bishop, like criticism of the President of the United States, ignores the sad truth that institutions do make midgets of us all. Efforts to remake institutions seem to me to be based on the assumption that our vitality as people of God is dependent on the vitality and relevance of the institutions, and I’m not at all sure that is the case. From the local to the national, even to the world-wide level it is the people, not the structures, who live and make known the Good News. My Jesuit brother Francis recognizes this and at least at times ignores the structures to share the Good News with the people of the world, be they within the church or not. Is it not just a tad ironic that he would be ineligible to be considered a candidate for the primacy of our church or of the Church of England — perhaps any Anglican church, due to his age? It is less changes to the size, shape, building materials of the box that we need; it’s leaders willing to step outside the box. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more