Utah hits 14 3-pointers, eases by LSU 95-71 in NIT

May 8, 2021

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first_img Written by March 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah hits 14 3-pointers, eases by LSU 95-71 in NIT Associated Press Tags: Basketball/Utah Utes FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Sedrick Barefield led five Utah starters in double figures with 17 points and the Utes hit 14 3-pointers en route to a 95-71 victory over LSU on Monday night in the first round of the NIT.Utah scored the first four points of the game and built a 21-point first-quarter lead after a 19-2 run — with eight points from Barefield. The Utes’ lead reached 27 points in the second quarter before LSU closed the half on an 8-0 run to pull to 47-30. Utah shot 63 percent from the field in the half, including 7 of 14 from 3-point range.Justin Bibbins added 16 points, hitting four 3-pointers, for Utah (21-11). Gabe Bealer added three 3s and 13 pointsFreshman Tremont Waters had 19 points, eight assists and four steals for LSU (18-15). Skylar Mays added 16 points and senior Aaron Epps scored 12.LSU, under first-year coach Will Wade, was attempting to win two games in the NIT for the first time since 1970.last_img read more


Celebrate 375

March 1, 2021

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first_imgIn 2011, Harvard celebrated the 375th anniversary of the founding of Harvard College in 1636. Experience this celebration through this video of the College’s momentous birthday party.Visit the official 375th website for more information about the University-wide celebration of Harvard’s 375th anniversary.last_img


Speaker predicts economic stagnation

January 26, 2021

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first_imgThe man once named Washington’s funniest celebrity, Robert P. Gwinn Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Austan Goolsbee, spoke Tuesday evening in the Eck Center on the future of the American economy. Emma Farnan | The Observer Austan Goolsbee, professor of economics at the University of Chicago, examines the past and present state of the U.S. economy in a lecture on Tuesday night.“It is usually the case that when you have a deep downturn, it is followed by a rapid recovery,” Goolsbee said. “We didn’t have this ‘V-shaped’ recovery after the worst economic downturn since we’ve had GDP data, it never came back.”These groups believe, according to Goolsbee, “we go through a recession, a financial crisis, and once the deleveraging finishes then we will start growing.”Goolsbee, who formerly served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors to President Obama, said proponents of this idea rely on flawed logic. “The FED and the private sector have been wrong year after year because they have embodied in their mind an implicit return to normal,” he said. “In their mind what is normal is defined as what it was in 2006.”Goolsbee said the economy has undergone fundamental changes which disprove this theory.“All the V-shaped recoveries in U.S. history have come when the economy can return right back to what it was doing before the recession,” he said, “This time we had a [housing] bubble, and the bubble popped, and we can’t return to that.”A transformation of the U.S. economy from that which existed before the 2008 financial crisis, according to Goolsbee, is necessary for a full recovery.“Transforming from what we were doing to something new, and that is never a fast process, and it is never an easy process,” he said. “ … It’s happening, but it’s happening slowly, and that is why we never had a V-shaped recovery.”There are four major factors that many economists believe could help save the American economy: consumer spending, other countries, oil prices and Washington. All these fail short according to Goolsbee. He said other countries cannot help the recovery, and lower oil prices won’t help the economy because of low global demand for goods and oil and the lessened importance of oil in the economy due to energy efficiency.As for Washington, Goolsbee said if the government did anything, it might do harm rather than good.“Probably they would do nothing,” he said. “There is a small probability that they do something way worse like we like default on the U.S. debt for no reason.”Despite the forecast of many economists that the U.S. economy is entering a period of stagnation, Goolsbee said there is reason to be hopeful.“We start from a position of strength and not of weakness,” he said. “ … The cost of capital is favorable, we have a productive workforce, we have a strong rule of law, and it is consistently shown in survey … the number one place to invest is the United States.“We remain the most entrepreneurially-oriented, innovative culture on earth, if you look at data. … The ability of U.S. businesses to adopt to new technology … we have proven better at that than anyone else.”Tags: economy, Politicslast_img read more


Speakers explore significance of Saint Mary’s education

January 26, 2021

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first_imgFollowing the presentations, attendants were given an opportunity to respond to the speakers.Sr. Eva Hooker emphasized the importance of being welcoming as a community when she recalled a conversation she had with two members of the South Bend community who were not sure it was OK for them to enjoy their picnic lunch on campus.Ufomata was then asked how she thought the College community could help people live out their potential and embody the mission of Saint Mary’s.“I think what we’re doing here is a start,” she said.A Tuesday report incorrectly stated Dana Strait, vice president for strategy and finance at Saint Mary’s, received her Ph.D. in music theory. Strait received her Ph.D. in neuroscience. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: Landscapes of the Spirit Margaret Cicchiello | The Observer Provost Titilayo Ufomata spoke Monday about Saint Mary’s mission and the enduring power of its founding sisters’ spirit. Members of the Saint Mary’s community gathered on Monday to hear Dana Strait, vice president for strategy and finance, and Titilayo Ufomata, the provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, speak at “Landscapes of the Spirit.”Judy Fean, vice president for mission, introduced the speakers by discussing the event’s founding four years ago.“[The event was founded] so we could get a sense of how people here do live the mission and how being a Catholic Holy Cross Institution … makes a difference,” Fean said.Strait described several instances in which she’s experienced prejudice for being a woman, including being told to “stay realistic” when telling her mother she wanted to attend medical school and having a professor tell her “women just aren’t suited for Beethoven — it needs a man’s touch.”Strait said she went on to “devour Beethoven’s sonatas for the rest of [her] musical career,” and received a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Northwestern.“As I learned more about who we are and how we were founded and the mission that guides us — a mission that was founded by the sisters of the Holy Cross, these radical, devoted women with the mission to improve the world around them — the flame that drew me into this campus began to take shape,” Strait said. “… The Sisters who founded us and who continue to invite us to share in their ministry forged a radical history of pushing the limits of what is acceptable for young women in contemporary society and in the Church, always in response to the needs of the complex world around us.”Strait said she found herself and her story, or her “flame,” woven into the sisters of the Holy Cross.“It’s a story of risk-taking and being on the leading edge of what’s acceptable and appropriate for women to be doing, of doing things … like playing a Beethoven sonata, that might be thought of by some as needing a man’s touch,” Strait said. “It’s a story of empowering women to be auto mechanics in the 1920s, to be medical professionals serving on battlefields during the Civil War … and to enter the male-dominated fields of business and accounting as early as the 1970s. For those in the Church, the sisters founded the first graduate school, where women could earn a theological education — the first in the world.”Strait said living her mission is about bringing her “full self” to work.“This is the first job where I’ve been able to live out all of the parts of me: my woman-ness, my big ideas, my scientific and analytical self, my creative self, my spiritual and Christian identity, my belief that God has a flame burning on this campus and that God invites me and all of my parts to be a part of it,” she said.Ufomata began her address by reflecting on the mission of Saint Mary’s.“What does it mean to live the mission at Saint Mary’s College?” she said. “… I look at this question from the perspective of God’s work on Earth, particularly of building a Christian community.”Ufomata said she learned this sense of community from her upbringing in Nigeria, and she now carries it wherever she goes.“We have a saying in my language that translates roughly to ‘what can be divided can be shared,’” she said. “I grew up seeing a lot of people in a lot of need who never lost their dignity … because the community ‘covered them,’ as we say in my language. People took care to protect the dignity of those they supported. They understood that membership of community includes responsibilities to the whole and to each other.”last_img read more


Ding! The Lion King Rings the NYSE Opening Bell

January 18, 2021

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first_imgHakuna Matata! The Lion King’s Rafiki (also known as Nteliseng Nkhela), stopped by the New York Stock Exchange on August 29 to ring the opening bell. It was all in celebration of the fact that the Disney musical will play its 7,000th Great White Way performance on September 3, only the fourth show in Broadway history to reach the milestone. Long may The Lion King reign! from $75.00 View Comments The Lion King Related Showslast_img read more


4 ways to tackle credit card debt

December 17, 2020

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first_imgWhen it comes to reducing debt, there’s a disconnect between desire and action.A Northwestern Mutual 2018 Planning & Progress Study found that while 53% of Americans say debt reduction is their top financial priority, the average personal debt in 2018 is $38,000 and climbing.Consumers can’t keep up. Thirty-three percent have accumulated $5,000 to $25,000 in debt instead of building their personal savings. And two in 10 consumers said they’d need to set aside 50% to 100% of their income to achieve debt repayment.About 13% believe they will be in debt for the rest of their lives.Credit cards and mortgages tied as the top source of consumer debt. Educational loans and car loans rounded out the top three.It may be a case of giving in to an “urge to splurge” mentality; 56% of respondents said they don’t believe debt will really have an impact on their financial security.It may feel overwhelming or hopeless to try, but you can pay down debt, save and still have fun. Here are a few ways to make a dent in credit card debt.Know what you owe: Yes, get all those statements and write down the total due, minimum payments and interest rate. You can’t make a plan if you don’t know what you are working with. Rank balances from highest to lowest interest rates and decide which one to tackle first. For some that means going after the largest balance and highest rates. For others, they get a boost from seeing something zeroed out, so they pay off the smaller balances first.Give a little more: Pay a bit more than the minimum balance due. Every little bit helps.Look into balance transfers: You may be able to score a balance transfer rate as low as 0% for up to 18 months. As long as you aren’t running up any new charges on the card from which you’ve transferred the balance, it can give you some breathing room. It’s a chance for your minimum payment (or even paying a little more than the minimum) to go further in whittling down that balance. As always, read the fine print and see if it makes financial sense for you.Consider personal loans: With a lower interest rate, this may be an option to consolidate the debt; but again, only if you no longer are using any of the credit cards. If you are running up credit card debt on top of the personal loan payments, you will sink even deeper into debt. 236SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Myriam DiGiovanni After writing for Credit Union Times and The Financial Brand, Myriam DiGiovanni covers financial literacy for FinancialFeed. She is also a storytelling expert and works with credit unions to help … Web: www.financialfeed.com Detailslast_img read more


Lu Zhang, Fushion Fund, on data regulation in China, US

November 20, 2020

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first_imgData protection laws and approaches differ in the U.S., Europe and China.- Advertisement – Lu told CNBC that while there are some short-term pains, in the longer term, regulation results in a healthier environment. But the challenge is putting together laws that would work for everyone — which require efforts from government agencies, investors, entrepreneurs and big corporations, she said.“If we just put a one-stop solution on it … not only we may have short-term problem with potential growth, may also extend to the long-term issue,” she said.U.S.-China splitWhen asked about the technology rivalry and possibility that the U.S. and China might go their separate ways, she said in recent years, start-up founders in Silicon Valley have shied away from foreign capital.“Most of the Silicon Valley founders would prefer to take local VC money like us instead of taking foreign capital,” she said, explaining that they do so to avoid any regulatory complications. Those companies are generally short on cash and if they had to wait for six months or longer to clear regulatory hurdles before fundraising, they may not survive, according to Lu.“There is sufficient capital in the United States, especially in Silicon Valley, to fund the local start-up companies,” she said.KPMG in a report said that in the third quarter of 2020, VC-backed companies in the U.S. raised $37.8 billion across 2,285 deals. “Regulation has been a popular topic for the past couple of years, especially within the VC (venture capital) industry,” Lu Zhang, who is also managing partner at Fusion Fund, said on CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia” on Friday. The interview was part of CNBC’s annual East Tech West conference, which is being held this year both remotely and on the ground in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.With digital transformation happening across all industries, many of the big tech companies are sitting on large volumes of data that are being generated, Lu explained. Gaining access to that data in order to innovate is “much, much harder for the smaller start-ups.”“I think fundamentally we really welcome the regulation especially focused on data monopoly,” she said.Data privacy laws- Advertisement – SINGAPORE — Regulation aimed at addressing data monopoly among big tech firms could create a healthier environment for start-ups to innovate, according to the founder of Fusion Fund.The California-based venture firm invests in early-stage technology companies in the U.S. and Canada in sectors including health-care applications and has backed the likes of SpaceX and Lyft.- Advertisement – Meanwhile, regulators in Europe and in California, for example, have implemented rules aimed at giving users more control over the personal information that companies collect about them in exchange for services. The United Nations said as of early 2020, about 66% of countries have some form of data privacy laws and another 10% have draft legislation in place.Critics have raised concerns that sweeping data protection laws can potentially stifle innovation and hurt smaller businesses that need to fork up capital in order to comply with the rules. Dünzl | ullstein bild | Getty Images – Advertisement –last_img read more


Xavier Amaechi annoyed over Europa League final snub as fears grow over his Arsenal future

October 18, 2020

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first_imgXavier Amaechi annoyed over Europa League final snub as fears grow over his Arsenal future Advertisement Emery gave the token place on the bench to Iliev instead of Amaechi (Picture: Getty)There will be pressure on Emery to give Amaechi a shot in the first team over pre-season this summer, and the campaign that follows, or risk him leaving for nothing when his contract expires.Arsenal have lost other promising talents in recent years, such as Chris Willock and Marcus McGuane to Benfica and Barcelona respectively, and would expect a decent fee should any club try to prise Amaechi away this summer.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisement Commentcenter_img Metro Sport ReporterSunday 2 Jun 2019 5:26 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2.1kShares The teenager went to Baku but was the only player left out of the squad (Picture: Getty)Arsenal are increasingly worried about the prospect of losing one of their most promising young players, Xavier Amaechi, after he was left out of the Europa League final squad.The 18-year-old is widely regarded as a future first-team player and the latest talent off Arsenal’s conveyor belt of young starlets, netting four times and laying on five assists in 14 outings for the Under-21s.He travelled with the squad to Baku for the Europa League final against Chelsea last Wednesday – which the Gunners lost 4-1 – but did not make the expanded 12-man bench. Amaechi travelled to Baku but was not in the 23-man matchday squad (Picture: Getty)According to Football.London, that did not go down at all well with Amaechi, with the youngster particularly annoyed with Unai Emery’s decision to list goalkeeper Dejan Iliev ahead of him – even though Bernd Leno was already on the bench.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTHe was the only player in the travelling party not to be included, and it is likely to cause problems in Arsenal’s negotiations to get the teenager to sign a new deal.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityHis current contract expires at the end of next season but he has been stalling on talks over a renewal and is considering leaving the Emirates to further his development.Arsenal are conscious of a number of clubs circling around Amaechi, notably Bayern Munich – who have restarted their hunt for British talent afresh after Callum Hudson-Odoi’s injury.last_img read more


Unique design in international inspired contemporary home

October 6, 2020

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first_imgMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoInside 58 Wendouree Crescent.“It is great for storing stuff like luggage and Christmas decorations — things that you don’t use very often.”Set on a 714sq m block on a street that is right behind the Brisbane River, the home has extra-high ceilings, French glass doors and large glass windows to make it ideal for Queensland’s sunny lifestyle. 58 Wendouree Crescent, WestlakeWHEN Randy Rainbolt moved from his native home of Texas to sunny Queensland, he made his home a little bit American.He purchased an empty block close to the river at 58 Wendouree Crescent in Westlake 19 years ago where he planned on building his ideal family house.The double-storey, four-bedroom home has influences in its design from all around the globe.“I actually designed the house,” Mr Rainbolt said.“It has a casual, Mediterranean kind of feel.”Hidden at the top of the home is an American style walk-in attic, which is a real rarity in Australian homes. “I use it all the time,” he said. Perfect for outdoor entertaining.An outside undercover dining area has wooden flooring and ceiling fans to keep it cool in the hot summer afternoons. He picked up some of the furnishings and for the outdoor area from Bali and Singapore to give it a unique feel.“It would be good for someone that likes entertaining. We have had a lot of good parties here,” he said.The house is a quick walk from the banks of the Brisbane River and is close to a number of parks. With his kids having grown up he plans to sell the home and move into something a bit smaller in the area. “It is probably a good house for families with kids that need to have space to run around,” he said.The home is on the market through Centenary Real Estate for offers above $1 million.last_img read more


EIOPA: ‘No clear evidence’ of short-termism from pension funds

September 29, 2020

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first_imgThe supervisor made two main recommendations.One is for a “cross-sectoral” framework to be developed, which should be the base for developing concrete definitions and good practices to identify unjustified short-term behaviour, and for identifying measures to promote long-term investment and sustainable economic growth.There should be defined objectives and concrete targets, but the framework should respect the principle of investment freedom and not prescribe specific or mandatory holding periods or turnover ratios.EIOPA also called for the development and publication of long-term performance benchmarks, saying the “availability of transparent and commonly understandable long-term benchmarks should benefit both providers and customers”.It is up to the European Commission to decide whether to take up any of the supervisory authorities’ recommendations. The European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) found “no clear evidence of undue short-termism” in insurance companies and pension funds, the supervisory authority said in feedback to the European Commission.EIOPA and the other two European supervisory authorities last month delivered their reports in response to a European Commission request for them to investigate whether parts of the financial sector put companies under “undue” short-term pressures on companies, with short-termism defined as “prioritising near-term shareholder interests over long-term growth of the firm”.EIOPA said the Commission’s request had not given a concrete definition of what excessive short-termism meant in practice, and that the lack of an appropriate framework and commonly accepted definition meant it was challenging to find “clear evidence from which to draw conclusions”.Although it had not found any clear evidence of undue short-termism in insurance and IORPs, EIOPA said the entities’ adaptation to macroeconomic circumstances, such as the persistent low interest rate environment, “may imply a shift in their role as long-term investors and insurance and pension providers to their clients”.last_img read more