Diary of a captain – Boxing

May 3, 2021

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first_imgSOME flirt with the idea for a few sessions, maybe even a fortnight, but you can spot the reaction in people’s faces: this is hard. When you enter the ring you know that there’s no team to back you up. The guy in the opposite corner has trained for weeks and has dedicated hours of his life to ensure these are the hardest three rounds you’ll ever face. You can’t afford to be weak, you can’t afford not to train hard and you can’t afford to make a mistake. For the squad the pinnacle of the season is Varsity. But to get there you need bouts, which means a continual cycle of peaking physically for fights throughout the season. No one can afford to be on anything other than top form for a contest, so the training is intense from the word go. Preparations begin before the start of Michaelmas when our nutritional plans kick in and the hard work starts. All squad members train 7-10 times per week with the emphasis on building up split second explosive power and technical ability. In a typical session sprints precede circuits on the rope, then sparring. Rounds on the bags are mixed with drills, shadow boxing and more body weight circuits. Track and hill sprint sessions are run two mornings a week, conditioning the body through intervals to reach maximum performance quickly with the fastest recovery time possible. You don’t eat before these! Weight circuits run in the evening focus on explosive movements to build strength and stamina without size, where dedicated sparring sessions focus on building the finished product. We have a mature squad this year, retaining talent from past Blues and others who have trained with the club before. The female squad has gone from strength to strength, receiving recognition from the Blues’ committee, although not counting towards our Varsity fight. We stand to make it 3 wins in 3 this year at the Town Hall, and the pressure of wanting to achieve is already bearing down on us.last_img read more


Amish barn fire claims more than 200 calves

April 20, 2021

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first_img Pinterest Amish barn fire claims more than 200 calves WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Previous articleSouth Bend man sentenced to 16 years in prisonNext articleMichigan voters set a record for turnout in primary election Tommie Lee Facebook Pinterest By Tommie Lee – August 6, 2020 0 285 Google+ (Photo supplied/Flickr Creative Commons) More than 200 calves died in a barn fire Wednesday night.WSBT reports the fire started around 4:30 p.m. in the 59,000 block of State Rd. 13 south of Middlebury.Firefighters battled the flames for more than two hours. The owner of the Amish barn and his children were inside when the fire began, but escaped without injury.The building was a total loss. Google+ Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Twitterlast_img read more


Phish, Dead & Company, And The String Cheese Incident To Headline New Festival

March 2, 2021

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first_img(Just kidding.)HAPPY 51st BIRTHDAY, RICK ASTLEY!<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>last_img


Questions, answers with Harvard’s Muslim chaplain

March 1, 2021

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first_imgKhalil Abdur-Rashid was named Harvard’s first full-time Muslim chaplain last July, bringing with him a strong foundation in civil rights, social work, higher education, and Islamic law and philosophy. Since choosing Islam as a youth, and embarking on a spiritual journey whose genesis began around the time of 9/11, Abdur-Rashid has cultivated a strong, personal understanding of the African-American Muslim experience.The holder of master’s of philosophy degrees in Islam and Middle Eastern studies, both from Columbia University, and an Islamic advanced doctorate (ijaaza ilmiyyah) in Islamic legal sciences and ethics from the ISAR Seminary in Istanbul, Abdur-Rashid is also nearing the completion of a doctorate in liberal studies, for which he is writing a history of the development of the African-American Muslim community, from the death of Malcolm X to the death of Muhammad Ali.But while his understanding of Islam is deeply steeped in rigorous academic inquiry, it is the imperative to help young people connect religious tradition to lived experience that largely drives his work at Harvard.Abdur-Rashid sat down with the Gazette to reflect on his first academic year, and to share his thoughts on the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for the religious community on campus, and in particular for Muslim American students at Harvard.Q&AKhalil Abdur-RashidGAZETTE: You’re closing in on completing your first academic year here. How has your time been spent, thus far?ABDUR-RASHID: My first year was about doing everything I could to map out the landscape. It was about beginning to understand the culture of the University and the students’ needs, both in terms of, generally speaking, students at the College, and also, more specifically, the Muslim students at the College and graduate schools. I’ve also sought to understand what kinds of programs I can offer to best root the students in a sense of stability. This is so important in today’s overwhelmingly changing social climate.GAZETTE: Talk more about the opportunity for a university to have a full-time Muslim chaplain. Why is this important to Harvard, and to the students themselves?ABDUR-RASHID: First and foremost, as President Drew Faust articulated in her rationale for creating this position, there was a matter of equality that needed to be addressed on behalf of Harvard’s Muslim students. Historically, many have felt the sense of being marginalized, of being targeted, and of being left behind. There was a need for somebody to be able to speak to their concerns in a way that represented both the University and where those students were coming from. I’m able to do this in a way that helps them better discover what it means to be a student of an American Muslim background. I can empathize with their feelings of being targeted or of feeling ashamed of their identity. And I can do these things in my role as a University representative, seeking to help those students to understand that they can be proud of who they are.GAZETTE: I imagine you draw on your experience for this work. You have your own unique story to tell as an American Muslim who chose his faith tradition at an early age.ABDUR-RASHID: Yes, I can very closely relate to these students. My own experience around a similar age challenged me to figure out what it means to be an American Muslim. I had just graduated from college on 9/11, a traumatic experience and a major turning point for our nation and for Muslims living in America and abroad. But this was also a defining moment for me personally, because it took place at the time when I went on my own spiritual journey, and also when I went out into the real world. It was a lot to deal with all at once. A lot of these students are experiencing similar feelings of so much happening at the same time. They’ve left the homes they grew up in and the families they grew up with. They’re living in dormitories for the first time, getting exposed to different foods that their moms didn’t cook. They’ve arrived in Cambridge, which is in one sense a bubble, and which is in another sense one of the most diverse places on the planet. So much is new, and I seek to help guide them through this newness.Of course, I draw upon my own background and experiences in my work. My youth as an African-American growing up in the South, whose family was very much involved in the Civil Rights Movement, mixed with my own studies in Islam and my own spiritual journey in a post-9/11 world, have afforded me the opportunity to look at the intersections of race and religion in an American context. These experiences have allowed me to explore the challenges that come with that intersection, and to learn how to rise above those challenges, and speak to those challenges, in a way that’s authentic and gives hope. “They’re living in dormitories for the first time, getting exposed to different foods that their moms didn’t cook. They’ve arrived in Cambridge, which is in one sense a bubble, and which is in another sense one of the most diverse places on the planet.” GAZETTE: What are some of the specific challenges for Muslim students at Harvard?ABDUR-RASHID: The major consistent challenges that I’ve seen since I’ve been here come in two domains. The first domain, which affects mostly students at the College, is about “What does Islam have to say about x, y, and z?” For example, police brutality. Gender identity. Can I take Adderall to help me stay up at night to study?Many of these students grew up in a Muslim home, from a cultural background, and even a religious background, but it was never articulated to them how to be a Muslim in the worldly sense, outside of ritual. Now, in this environment, they have to think for themselves. They have to try to find answers. Sometimes they may come across things in class or when they’re in dialogue with their peers that jar them, challenge them, and cause them to ask questions of themselves as to who they are and where they stand on these issues, not only as American students but as Muslim students. The American side of their brain might trigger one answer, but the Muslim identity might respond differently. Are they consistent? Are there divergences? What happens if the Muslim side says no or yes and the American side says no or yes, and they’re in contradiction? How do I reconcile those two? Is it even possible? And then, how do I think about this whole notion of a dual consciousness? That’s what I see at the level of the College.The second domain, which is more prevalent in the graduate Schools, is more about how to intersect Islam with a student’s field of study and planned career path. It’s about how do I “interdisciplinarize” my faith with my work?Let me give you an example. A young woman from the Kennedy School came into my office the other day. She’s a Muslim woman from an East Asian country, one year away from graduation, who told me she wants to go back to her country and become the first Muslim woman prime minister there. That was her goal. So her question to me was: What does Islam say about this, and how do I persuade the male-dominated culture that I come from that I should be prime minister? How do I work within an Islamic framework, using terminology and sources from the tradition, in a way that will resonate with Muslim clerics in her country, to the men in her country who are in parliament, and to those who would come to her website to learn more about her candidacy? Amazing, right?GAZETTE: Let’s talk more about this “interdisciplinarization” that you advocate for in your own work, because it reminds me of all of the diverse opportunities here at Harvard, the multitude of Schools, programs, activities, and perspectives that all make up this University, yet too often exist in silos. President Faust has spoken frequently about the importance of creating “One Harvard,” and breaking down barriers across campus. Have you had any One Harvard moments in your first year, and how can your work serve to further this important mission?ABDUR-RASHID: The vision of One Harvard is absolutely reachable within the work that I do, and especially through collaborations with the 30-plus Harvard chaplains here. We believe, together, that this University is sending the message that Harvard is about making the world a better place. And we believe One Harvard is about utilizing all of our individual strengths to leverage our collective strength in hopes of reaching that goal. As chaplains, of course, we advocate for the religious, spiritual, and ethical life to supplement the intellectual life, that the human being is not just a robust intellectual being but a spiritual being as well.GAZETTE: But Harvard is often seen as a secular institution. How does spiritual life fit in here, and how does it complement the academic journey being undertaken by Harvard students?ABDUR-RASHID: In life, just like there’s an IQ, there’s also an SQ, a spiritual quotient, and I believe that both of those things need to be synchronized. I also believe that faith and spirituality matter here at Harvard. And they matter because they help students to learn the right thing to do in an environment where the right thing is often based in very restrictive settings — in a math class based on algorithms, or in a language class that’s based on grammatical rules, or in another class that’s based on the rules that the teacher has outlined.One of the things I do with both undergraduate and graduate students is give them a religious language to use that makes sense in the secular environment. And often that language is ethics. How do you treat people, and how do you advocate for good treatment? My work is less about helping students to understand Islam as a theological tradition. For most of these students, that’s already a given. Instead, so many are looking for ways to translate the teachings that they know so well into a way that can be a part of their studies and their future professions. I seek to help them to understand Islam as a lived experience.GAZETTE: What are some of the programmatic offerings you’re working on to help students to enhance their “spiritual quotients”?ABDUR-RASHID: I’ve just finished putting together 10 programs that will be gradually introduced in phases over the next three years. These programs will be directed toward Muslim students, but also University-wide, open to everyone, even if they’re not students of faith. There will be two programs this coming fall, the first of which is called “Life Matters.” “Life Matters” is an interview show where I speak with an esteemed faculty member or prestigious person who is a part of the Harvard community, and ask her or him to share certain aspects of their life story that no one would have known before. We’ll discuss times when that person has faced a challenge, and how they’ve used some aspect of faith or spiritual teachings, or even family teachings passed down, in their decision-making process in order to overcome those obstacles. We hope to have these shows available as podcasts for archive and for the benefit of future students and alumni.We’ll also have a program called “Faith in Conversations,” a roundtable discussion involving me and two or three distinguished members of the faith community at Harvard. The conversations will not be about commonalities, but instead we’ll talk about our differences and how these differences can be used to get to know one another and eliminate blind spots that we have around each other.The whole idea is that narratives are very powerful, that when you get to know someone, this is what can break down walls. I’m looking forward to partnering with Pastor Jonathan Walton of Memorial Church, and the Rev. Kathleen Reed, who is president of the Harvard chaplains, for the first program. I hope to start with the Abrahamic traditions, and then go into other traditions. I’m very much looking forward to it.This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.last_img read more


South Africa’s Eskom plans 1.4GWh battery storage tender, largest on the continent

December 31, 2020

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:South Africa’s utility Eskom is preparing to launch a tender for 1.4 gigawatt-hours of battery storage that will need to be installed by December 2021.The large-scale energy storage tender, the first of its kind in the country and in Africa as a whole, will be split into two phases, with an initial 200 megawatts/800 megawatt-hours of capacity to be built by December 2020, an Eskom official said.This first phase of implementation will be divided into four packages, and will be followed by 160 megawatts/640 megawatt-hours to be installed a year later, Prince Moyo, general manager for power delivery engineering at Eskom, said during a Wednesday webinar. The second phase will include 60 megawatts of solar to be integrated with the battery storage, along with an asset performance management system.The tender has already been approved by South Africa’s Ministry of Finance, Moyo said. The only ministry that has not yet signed off is the Department of Public Enterprises, Moyo added. That consent “has been escalated to the highest level,” he said, without committing to a launch date for the solicitation. “It’s imminent,” he said.Moyo called the battery tender “a flagship project” for Eskom, which supplies around 90 percent of South Africa’s electricity via more than 45 gigawatts of generation. “We are moving toward cleaner power,” he said.More: South Africa’s Eskom preparing first large-scale battery tender South Africa’s Eskom plans 1.4GWh battery storage tender, largest on the continentlast_img read more


Athlete Diet: Vegetarian or Paleo?

December 30, 2020

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first_imgVegetarianNot so long ago, most athletes looked at a plant-based diet as an unfortunate affliction. Tell another athlete you didn’t eat meat (voluntarily!), and you’d get a look that was at once puzzled and sympathetic, as if you’d just said you put Yoo-Hoo in your gas tank.Now, athletes at the pinnacle of their sports, from ultramarathoner Scott Jurek to mixed martial arts fighter Mac Danzig, have settled on vegan diets to resounding success–and with limited amounts of tree hugging and granola crunching!Why the dramatic shift in attitude? Professional athletes tell me that the crucial benefit of a plant-based diet is in the recovery. After a tough workout, they simply need less time to rest than when they used to eat meat. This means they can get back out there sooner to do it all again–and at the elite level, more workouts means more success.But what about the rest of us, the weekend warriors who may have no reason to work out any more than we already do? For us, recovering faster with plant fuel still has benefits. For one, being more prepared for your next workout means fewer injuries.A vegetarian diet also means cleaner arteries, reduced risk of heart disease, and a healthier, happier body. Our bodies are built to digest vegetables. The caveman is a myth. For all of human history, most of our calories came from plants.But how can you possibly get enough protein from plants, right?Getting enough protein as a vegan athlete isn’t such a big deal, honest. Yes, you lose a lot of calories when you cut out meat, dairy, and eggs, and you’ve got to replace most of them if you want to get and stay stronger and faster. But there’s nothing special about the protein that comes from animals, and you can get all you need–which isn’t nearly as much as we’ve been led to believe—from plants.As a vegetarian (and even a vegan), I’ve found that these restrictions have made me more conscious of what I put into my body each day. Whereas I used to excuse the occasional hamburger or ice cream sundae as perks in an otherwise healthy diet, being vegan literally takes those indulgences off the table.Elite athletes may be interested in faster recovery and more workouts, but even we mere mortals can benefit from a vegetarian diet—whether that means a faster marathon time or just less time logged at McDonald’s.Matt Frazier is a vegan marathoner and ultramarathoner who shares his experiences and advice at his website NoMeatAthlete.com. Paleo I first encountered the Paleo lifestyle in 2008, when I wanted to transition into lightweight rowing.  This means that two hours before I race, I step on a scale and must weight under 130 pounds. My race lasts seven minutes plus, and my heart rate averages 180 beats per minute. I race a heat, a semi and a final and sometimes even a fourth heat if I don’t advance by placing in top positions.Just to keep up, I need recovery and consistency.  I need acute focus and agility to maneuver long skinny oars and balance the boat, all while attempting repeated perfect  strokes, even in extreme temperatures, wind, and rain. The Paleolithic diet was my answer to the intense demands of my transition to lightweight rowing.Paleo principles are about getting sunshine and eating real food (lean animal protein, vegetables, fruits, and healthy fats from coconut, avocado, olive oil, and moderate amounts of nuts and seeds). Along with dairy and processed fats and sugars, I stay away from beans and legumes, which contain saponins that act as toxins in the body. In addition, grains contain lectins and anti-nutrients that result in gut irritations in much of the population.Within the first three months of Paleo-eating I noticed how alive I felt. That may sound overly Zen, but as an athlete, you are mostly walking around depleted—tired from the training load. With Paleo, I recover faster, need less sleep, and have more energy and excitement for workouts. My nerves are sharper and I absorb technical changes more quickly. I started rowing late in the game, as a  twenty-six-year-old rower competing against eighteen-year-olds. I need all the extra energy I can get.I also find that I can really taste my food. And with every dollar I spend at farmers’ markets and on grass-fed meat, I am sending a message that corporate feedlots and GMOs are not okay. I go straight for the dark, leafy greens  for calcium and antioxidants. Root vegetables and tubers give me the energy to train, and the protein from wild-caught, naturally-fed meat contains the amino acids my muscles need to recover. Best of all, I don’t feel like I’m going hungry.Calorie for calorie, I’m getting the biggest bang per mouthful, and you can too. Beans and rice might keep you alive, but you won’t thrive. I’m moving towards thriving, and that is why I train, race, and eat Paleo.Ursula Grobler has spent three years on the U.S. Rowing National Team and is the current lightweight world record holder on the Concept 2 Ergometer.last_img read more


Victims Pistol-whipped in Baywood, North Bay Shore Home Invasions

December 18, 2020

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating a pair of armed home invasions during which victims were pistol whipped about one mile apart on the same day last week in Baywood and North Bay Shore, authorities said.In the first case, a gunman with his face covered kicked in the door of a Baywood home on Sonia Road, hit the victim in the head with a gun and demanded money at 4:25 a.m. Thursday, police said. The attacker fled empty handed.In the second case, three men—two of whom were armed with handguns—and a woman rang the doorbell of a Hemlock Drive apartment in North Bay Shore and then forced their way inside when the victim answered the door shortly before 10 p.m. Thursday, police said.That victim was also pistol whipped before the assailants fled with two watches, police said.There were neither any arrests nor descriptions of the suspects in either case. Third Squad detectives are continuing the investigations.last_img read more


5 ways to help members get financially ready for the holiday season

December 17, 2020

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first_imgBy using these five tips, your team can support members’ efforts to be financially ready for the holidays, helping them focus more on enjoying the wonder of the season. LSC is also here to help you offer simple gift solutions like prepaid gift cards with designs to fit every style. Contact us today to learn how your credit union can offer these and other prepaid cards to your members. 22SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Naomi Anderson Naomi Anderson is Vice President of Prepaid for LSC. In her current role, her team manages the day to day program support, customer service functions and implementations as well as … Web: Lsc.net Details The holiday season is here! It’s a wonderful time of year to enjoy with family and friends, but extra holiday expenses can add strain, especially for the 22% of Americans expecting to find themselves in holiday related debt (LendEDU). With the five tips below, you can help your members reduce holiday stress by getting financially ready for the season.Prepare for the unexpected: Nothing can cut into a holiday budget like emergency expenses. Remind your members to carry out regular maintenance on their cars and regularly check major appliances like furnaces to avoid expensive repairs cropping up in the middle of the holiday season. Health expenses are costly too, so you might also consider reminding members to go for regular check-ups to help avoid any unexpected health costs. Of course, no one can plan for everything, so most of all, encourage your members to create or build emergency funds.Focus on economical ways to celebrate: Help your members save money by notifying them of free or low-cost community events. You could also consider hosting a holiday event at your credit union. Also, share creative gift ideas such as acts of kindness in place of bought gifts.Start planning and saving ahead of time: What savings plans do you offer? Does your credit union have a Christmas club or other program to help members save for the season? If you do, be sure to remind them about it year round so they can build up the funds they need.Consider all holiday expenses: A survey by Deloitte reveals only 34% of holiday spending goes for gifts. The rest goes towards holiday get-togethers. The same study shows that 78% of people spend holiday money on themselves, mostly for food, liquor and clothes. Other holiday expenses include donations, entertainment, eating out, travel costs, and home items.Help members address these costs by sharing tips on social media or in emails highlighting the different expenses they should consider in their budgets. If your credit union offers prepaid cards, remind members how they can use the cards to keep their spending in line with their budgets. A gift card can work as both a budgeting tool for special holiday expenses and as a popular gift that allows members to easily stay within their budgets. With gift cards, members know exactly what they are spending.Bring the community together: Dealing with holiday expenses can be difficult, but a fresh perspective helps ease the strain. Encourage your members to share the ways they get financially ready for the holidays on your social media page. You can even share some of these suggestions on your website, bulletin board or lobby screen to reach members who are less active on social media.last_img read more


NYSEG warns customers about new scams

December 8, 2020

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first_imgThe company will never force customers to purchase products such as Green Dot cards to complete payments. If unsure about the identity of the caller, ask for the last five digits of the account. If they do not have that information, hang up and call authorities. All NYSEG employees have a photo ID with an employee number. It is recommended that individuals ask for the employee’s ID before providing any personal information. Be wary of unexpected emails from NYSEG, especially if you are not an eBill customer. If you are unsure about the email, payments can be made at nyseg.com.When making a payment by phone, always use company phone numbers: NYSEG customers can call (800) 600-2275. NYSEG says they are not entering customers homes or going door-to-door for non-emergency work at this time. (WBNG) — NYSEG released a statement saying they have received reports of customers getting calls from individuals who claim to be employees of the company on Friday. The company says if any customer is unsure if they received a call from an actual employee, they should call the phone number provided on their bill. center_img NYSEG is asking customers to refrain from giving out personal information to unsolicited callers. They say customers have reported receiving calls threatening to cut service unless immediate payments are completed over the phone.  NYSEG has provided customers with some helpful tips:last_img read more


Split Airport expects 3 millionth passengers this year

November 18, 2020

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first_imgSplit Airport is connected with more than a hundred flights a day during the summer months by direct flights of about 60 European airlines, which connect Split as the main center of Dalmatia with 108 destinations in Europe.In the past eight years, Split Airport has recorded an increase in the number of passengers every year, and their number increased from 1,2 million in 2010. to last year’s record of 2,8 million. According to the announcements of an excellent post-season, by the end of this year, over 3 million passengers are expected to pass and fly through Split Airport.Low cost carriers are the most important group in Split, bringing as many as half of passengers to Resnik. According to previous announcements by airlines, the growth trend of traffic and passengers, as well as aircraft, continues in the off-season. The number of passengers has more than doubled in the last ten years, although the practice of doubling traffic at airports over 15 years is another proof of the exceptional success of this domestic airport.Growth also brings challenges, ie the need to expand capacity. Thus, the works on the reconstruction and extension of the passenger terminal, which is being expanded by an additional 35 thousand square meters, for which the Airport has partially provided its own funds, should be completed by the 2019 season.Tourist records of Split-Dalmatia CountyPhoto: Action Let’s buy Croatian in Split, Croatian Chamber of CommerceThe record-breaking results achieved in the peak season in the Split-Dalmatia County continue with excellent results in the post-season period. According to the eVisitor system and the SDŽ Tourist Board, 431.504 arrivals and 2,117.324 overnight stays were realized in commercial accommodation in Central Dalmatia in September, which is an increase of 9 percent in arrivals and 1 percent in overnight stays.In the first nine months, 3.231.624 arrivals (an increase of 8 percent) and 16.928.079 overnight stays (an increase of 5 percent) were realized in commercial accommodation. Our most numerous guests in the first nine months are Poles with 308 thousand arrivals and 2,3 million overnight stays and Germans with 2 million arrivals, which grew by 6 percent in arrivals and 2 percent in overnight stays. Significant growth in arrivals and overnight stays in the first nine months compared to last year was recorded from the US market, with 25 percent in arrivals and 23 percent in overnight stays, as well as Scandinavian, British and French guests. The Split-Dalmatia County is a record holder in Croatian nautical tourism with 1,34 million overnight stays by boaters in the first nine months, or almost half of all nautical overnight stays made in Croatia.last_img read more