A Birmingham bakery

April 21, 2021

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first_imghas bought three new ovens after receiving a £46,000 grant from Advantage West Midlands. With the grant, the 109-year-old Lewis’s Bakery in Garrets Green, Birmingham, has diversified production, added four new jobs to up the workforce to 15 and increased baking capacity by around 25%. Managing director Simon Lewis has forecast a 15 to 20% increase in turnover in the next six months.last_img


UB prepares for festivities

April 21, 2021

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first_imgUnited Biscuits (UB) has unveiled its festive selection, which features three new biscuit ranges, four new cake products and four bagged snack launches.McVitie’s Cake Company is moving UB’s Temptations brand into the cake market for the first time, with the launch of Temptations Swirl a chocolate sponge filled with chocolate cream, enrobed with dark chocolate; Temptations Cake Bar chocolate sponge layered with white cream and topped with chocolate sauce enrobed in milk chocolate; and Temptations Digestive Slices two new variants comprising a digestive biscuit base with sultanas, topped with smooth milk chocolate available in either orange or mint.UB will also be launching McVitie’s Temptations in a new assortment of bite-size biscuits, coated in milk, white or dark Belgian chocolate.In UB’s savoury biscuit line, its Carr’s Selection is back in a new format and has been developed to complement “the finest cheese and wine”, said the firm.last_img read more


Broadway.com Ranks the Top 10 Best-Dressed Stars at the 2015 Tony Awards

January 18, 2021

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first_imgTonight’s the night! The seats are filled and the lights are dimming at Radio City Music Hall, which can only mean that it’s time for our favorite part of the Tony Awards: ranking the fashions. After poring over Broadway’s brightest on the red carpet, we’ve picked our five best-dressed men and women from the 2015 Tony Awards. Whose looks did you love most? Let us know in the comments below! 2. ANDY KARLSome men can just wear the hell out of a tuxedo, and Andy Karl is definitely one of those men. His Kenneth Cole duds are the height of classic, and his gorgeous wife Orfeh on his arm doesn’t hurt. Now here’s hoping he can keep his hands off the Tony host (and his hands-on On the Twentieth Century co-star) Kristin Chenoweth! 3. VANESSA HUDGENSThank heaven for Naeem Khan! Gigi star Hudgens, who will join her cast to perform during tonight’s show at Radio City, is the picture of springtime in the designer’s flowing, watercolor floral print. 1. ALEX SHARPSharp, Tony-nominated star of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, looks good enough to touch in this textured suit from Billy Reid! It takes a bold man to pull off a white jacket, and we happen to think Sharp is doing one hell of a job. 4. SYDNEY LUCASThe Tony-nominated Fun Home star is the picture of perfection on her first red carpet! Lucas’ deceptively detailed ecru dress by Erin Fetherston is a perfectly cut, and the subtle tone-on-tone pattern makes it feel sophisticated without being too grown up. Well played, Sydney! 1. KRISTIN CHENOWETHWhat’s a lady is a lady to wear, when she’s doing Tony double duty as both a co-host and a nominee for Best Actress in a Musical? For On the Twentieth Century’s Kristin Chenoweth, the only solution is to shine as bright as a Tony Award itself, in an intricately beaded, totally bodacious silver number from Zac Posen. 2. KELLI O’HARAIs The King and I star is channeling a little Anna with her fashion tonight? O’Hara’s ankle length brocade-inspired dress has all the charm and elegance of her character’s famously flouncy gown, but with a streamlined shape and sleek black and gold color palette for a modern appeal.center_img 4. MAX VON ESSENMaybe he’s picked up a thing or two from starring in An American in Paris, because this nominee is looking every bit as sharp as his Parisian character in this sharp, tailored suit from Brooks Brothers. View Comments 5. MATTHEW MORRISONBefore the Finding Neverland star blows the roof off of Radio City peforming alongside his co-star Kelsey Grammer, he stormed the red carpet in his suave, signature style. And, as always, his best accessories are an extremely jaunty pocket square and that Morrison smile. 5. GENEVA CARRIt may be a Sunday, but the Hand to God nominee is no Sunday school puppet theater teacher tonight! Carr looks like the star she is in this sleek, mermaid-cut dress by Theia, and the stop-in-your-tracks-red is every bit as stunning as the carpet she’s walking.And now, the gents… 3. STINGNo matter what you think about the beard (we happen to think it’s Abraham Lincoln chic), there’s no denying that the Tony-nominated composer of The Last Ship is rocking this double-breasted jacket like, well, a rock star. Never change, Sting.last_img read more


Rules abandoning wildlife protections rejected by federal court for second time

January 1, 2021

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first_imgA federal court on Tuesday overturned the Bush administration’s last attempt to weaken rules governing management of America’s 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands. The Bush rules, issued April 21, 2008, repealed key protections for national forests mandated under the National Forest Management Act (NFMA).The case was filed by a coalition of conservation groups — including the Vermont Natural Resources Council — represented by Earthjustice. The ruling was handed down by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. The effect of the ruling in Vermont is that important safeguards will need to be maintained on the Green Mountain National Forest, according to Jamey Fidel, forest and biodiversity program director of Vermont Natural Resources Council.“For example, if the Forest Service decides to amend the existing forest plan for any reason, it cannot utilize any of the weaker resource protection standards that the Bush administration tried to implement in the 2008 Rule. Furthermore, the ruling ensures that the Green Mountain National Forest will continue to maintain viable populations of wildlife, which has been a bedrock principle of national forest management for many decades.” Earthjustice represented Defenders of Wildlife, Sierra Club, The Wilderness Society, as well as the Vermont Natural Resources Council.Read the court’s decision here: http://www.earthjustice.org/library/legal_docs/nfma-order-09-06-30.pdf(link is external)The 2008 rule mirrored another issued by the Bush administration in 2005, which was also thrown out by a federal court. Like the 2005 rule, the 2008 rule eliminated mandatory protections in place since the Reagan administration that require the national forests to be managed to guarantee viable populations of all wildlife species, to preserve clean, healthy streams and lakes, and to protect diverse natural forests. The Bush rules also sought to reduce public participation in decisions about the management of our public forests.In ruling on plaintiffs’ claims under the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act, the court’s opinion stated: “[C]ourts have rejected USDA’s argument that the programmatic nature of the plan development rule necessarily means that it will have no effect on the environment or protected species.  The USDA has simply copied those rejected legal arguments in a new document and called it a ‘Biological Assessment.’ This is not sufficient to satisfy the [Endangered Species Act]’s requirements….Because the EIS does not evaluate the environmental impacts of the 2008 Rule, it does not comply with [the National Environmental Policy Act]’s requirements.”Earlier versions of the forest planning rules contained enforceable standards that protected wildlife, water, and the forests. The earlier rules also provided opportunities for public involvement and required analysis of environmental impacts of forest plans on the national forests and impacts that result from plan decisions regarding uses of forest resources.“America’s diverse wildlife that inhabits our national forests will be safer because of this ruling, which will require forest managers to look out for the welfare of every species,” said Earthjustice attorney Trent Orr. “The Bush administration tried twice to eliminate vital protections for all wildlife living in the national forests. Fortunately, America’s strong environmental laws, and groups willing to fight to enforce them, kept them from succeeding both times.”The court found that the Forest Service violated the National Environmental Policy Act by approving the new regulations based on a faulty environmental impact statement that failed to analyze adequately the environmental impacts of the new regulations and violated the Endangered Species Act by failing to examine the effects of eliminating wildlife protection standards on protected species.A separate lawsuit known as Citizens for Better Forestry v. U.S. Department of Agriculture challenged the same rule, and was consolidated with this litigation.Background:Congress passed the National Forest Management Act in 1976 to reform the Forest Service and to ensure that the agency give due consideration to non-timber resources, such as recreation, wildlife, and water. The NFMA regulations targeted by the Bush administration include the critical legal requirement that national forests be managed to maintain viable wildlife populations. This rule supports populations of popular game species such as elk, moose, and black bear, and helps keep sensitive and rare species off the endangered species list by identifying and correcting wildlife population declines before species become imperiled.The Reagan administration adopted this wildlife viability protection in response to declines in the population and range of many species. The Bush administration’s attempt to repeal the NFMA wildlife protections threatened a future in which rare species would once again dwindle and disappear from the national forests.The National Forest Management Act also requires the Forest Service to allow citizens to participate fully in forest management decisions. Source: VNRC. June 2, 2009last_img read more


Two Vermont organizations get more than half-million from USDA

January 1, 2021

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first_imgVermont is the beneficiary of more than $500,000 in federal funding to improve health care and education in the northern part of the state. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Thrusday that 100 recipients in 34 states and one territory will receive $30,172,507 to improve access to health care and educational services in rural areas. Funding is provided through the USDA Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) Program. The announcement included a $499,870 grant to North Country Supervisory Union in Newport, VT and an $84,141 grant to Orleans-Essex VNA & Hospice also in Newport.  ‘This program delivers educational and medical opportunities that are urgently needed in remote, rural areas,’ Vilsack said. ‘President Obama has said that no matter where you live in America, you should have access to quality educational opportunities.  Rural Americans deserve the same opportunities for education and medical care as metropolitan-area residents, and these funds will make that happen.’ Orleans-Essex VNA & Hospice, which provides home health care to a 1,000 square mile area in Orleans and northern Essex counties, will use the grant to continue implementation of in-home telemonitoring which was initiated in 2009.   An upgrade to the system will also expand the use of in-home videocams to monitor wound care.  North Country Supervisory Union will support the Northeast Kingdom Education Project that will link Lyndon State College (LSC) to 14 rural school districts primarily located in Orleans, Essex Counties.  Expanded videoconferencing technology at LSC will enhance their ability to offer dual enrollment courses in which high school students take college courses for both college and high school credit; provide information for students on the range of career opportunities available within key industries in the Northeast Kingdom and provide Masters in Education degree programs to the region’s teachers.  ‘Through this grant program, USDA Rural Development is working to level the playing field between rural and more urban areas.  Vermonters in the most remote locations will have access to advanced medical care and top notch educational opportunities because of these funds,’ according to Molly Lambert, State Director for USDA Rural Development. Further details on the DLT program can be obtained at www.rurdev.usda.gov/UTP_DLT.html(link is external)or by contacting Rhonda Shippee, Community Programs Director for VT/NH at 802-828-6033. For a complete list of awardees that will receive funding,  please click here  Awards are contingent upon the recipients meeting the terms of the agreement with USDA. USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, administers and manages housing, business and community infrastructure and facility programs through a national network of state and local offices. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural America. Rural Development has a portfolio of more than $160 billion in loans and loan guarantees. Visit http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/(link is external) for additional information about the agency’s programs or to locate a USDA Rural Development office.    WASHINGTON, December 8, 2011 ‘last_img read more


Who Owns the Hazel River?

December 30, 2020

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first_imgNearly all of us enjoy public waterways—and very few of us ever stop to consider how those waterways became public in the first place. In most cases, beyond picking up a state fishing license, we don’t give much thought to who owns the river (and why) at all. Unfortunately, anglers from Montana to North Carolina and Idaho to Pennsylvania are discovering that ignorance of riparian water rights is no excuse for violating them. The trouble is that “the law” can be as slippery as an eel. In fact, there’s no one “law” that dictates water rights: From state to state, laws concerning private ownership of, public access to, and public use of navigable and non-navigable waters differ. As confusion mounts, so too are the number of unpleasant run-ins between river lovers and riparian landowners. And what begins as a nasty spat all too often ends in court.The King’s RiverHow bad can it be? Very. Consider sleepy Culpeper County, Virginia, where for years riparian landowners, county residents, and state officials have bitterly disputed who may enjoy certain sections of the bucolic Hazel River. On one side of the conflict are three families, two of whom are related by marriage.These families argue that the low-water bridge area near Monumental Mills attracts the community’s unsavory elements, who take advantage of the seclusion to litter, copulate, and deal drugs; and that prolific trespassing keeps them from being able to enjoy their riparian property. In 2005, the riparian landowning families told Gary Close, then-Commonwealth’s Attorney for Culpeper County, that they possessed a Crown grant to the property—a royal deed, issued by the King of England in the 18th century, that ensured that they alone owned both the banks and the bottom of that section of the Hazel River.This was a plausible claim. As an English colony, Virginia was settled with many such Crown grants. Indeed, at one time nearly all of Culpeper County was part of such a grant. In 1802, however, the Virginia General Assembly passed a law stipulating that all land under water that was not previously conveyed would henceforth be held by the Commonwealth in trust for the public. These riparian landowners argued that because their land was conveyed before 1802, the law didn’t apply to their property.Close concurred with the families, and on September 29th 2005, he wrote a five page letter to then-Sheriff Lee Hart concluding with “My office will prosecute all trespass warrants issued by your deputies whether on the banks of the rivers in the low water bridge area or upon the surface of the rivers” [emphasis added]. Unfortunately, Close was dead wrong: His directive flew in the face of both state and federal laws. Naturally the now-infamous letter shocked the community and contributed to the acrimonious public discourse that exists to this day.Sheriff Hart did a little legwork himself—including soliciting advice from then-Attorney General Bob McDonnell (now Virginia’s governor)—and came to a very different conclusion. On Feb 15th, 2006 Hart wrote Close about a meeting with representatives from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and the Virginia Marine Resource Commission to hammer out a resolution to the conflict. Close chose not to attend. After this meeting, Hart made it clear to Close that state law presumed that the rivers were owned by the state, and, if deemed navigable by the Army Corps of Engineers, were open to the public for their enjoyment; and that he had no intention of arresting citizens for simply enjoying the river. Hart agreed with the landowners that upland property (the dry land alongside the river’s edge) was indeed privately owned—and that trespassers on upland property could and should be prosecuted. However, citizens who enjoyed the Hazel River without leaving its riverbed certainly had a right to do so.Emboldened by Close’s 2005 letter to Hart, riparian landowners immediately began confronting citizens who had long fished and canoed in the river. Landowners made hundreds of calls to the Culpeper County Sheriff’s Office to report trespassers—so many calls, in fact, that the low-water bridge across the Hazel river had to be given its own address to help dispatchers and other law-enforcement officials track the calls. Soon sheriff’s deputies found themselves caught in the middle of the dispute, with Sheriff Hart on one side arguing that citizens had every right to use the river, and Mr. Close on the other side demanding that anyone in the river near the low-water bridge be cited for trespassing. Deputies spent untold hours responding to and patrolling the low-water bridge area in an effort to keep the peace.A Valid ClaimNot surprising given Virginia’s colonial past, numerous Crown grants are extant in the Commonwealth—and some involve such popular and venerable rivers as the James, New, Shenandoah, York, Cowpasture, and Jackson. Indeed, the Commonwealth of Virginia itself issued Commonwealth grants—more or less similar to a Crown grant—after the Revolutionary War.Nevertheless, it is no small matter to get the Commonwealth to recognize one’s Crown grant. First, the riparian landowner who claims to own the riverbed must own the land on both sides of the river. Second, the contested area must be ruled on by a court of law. According to Brian Gottstein, Director of Communication for the Office of the Attorney General of Virginia, not even Virginia’s Attorney General has the authority to unilaterally recognize a Crown grant outside of court. The riparian landowners along the Hazel River didn’t own the land on both sides of the river, and at no time was their Crown grant adjudicated in court. As a result and as far as the Commonwealth was concerned, their claim of river bottom ownership was invalid. The landowners, however, had assumed that Mr. Close’s assessment of their situation was accurate—and had acted accordingly.For the better part of five years, Culpeper County residents were swept up in this imbroglio: Sections of the Hazel River were essentially off-limits to anglers, swimmers, and canoeists—to folks who had enjoyed the river all of their lives. The acrimony escalated when, apparently as an ill-conceived joke, a resident set off a device commonly known as a salute cannon. The offending cannon was triggered on a roadway near the residence of one of the riparian landowners, and while it didn’t hurl a projectile, it did make a sound consistent with its name. The harassed landowners, weary of locals’ angry drive-by cursing and littering, felt rather less amused than frightened and threatened by the cannon going off so close to their home.  They summoned the authorities, who soon arrested the practical jokester, a very well-liked individual who not long after found himself guilty of the crime. Suddenly no one was laughing.The arrest and conviction of a popular county resident helped galvanize the community to demand a public meeting with Close and insist that he reexamine his position on the ownership of that section of the Hazel River. Locals did a bit of their own research, uncovering and producing evidence that they believed refuted Close’s legal opinion.Upon reexamination, Close grudgingly admitted that he had been wrong. On July 29th, 2010, Close wrote to Sheriff Hart that with regard to a claim of Crown grant ownership on the Hazel, “no such registered river exists in Culpeper County.” He continued, “Therefore the public is presumed to the use and enjoyment of any river in or adjoining the county. The impact on the issuance of trespass warrants for the use of any river in Culpeper County is clear. No trespass warrants should be issued.” By this time, however, the damage had been done: Neighbor had turned against neighbor. Residents were so thoroughly confused by the issue that many simply refused to come back to the Hazel River. Others fumed that local and state leaders had done little or nothing to rectify the issue, choosing to ignore it until the matter had escalated out of control.Virginia legislators have recently established a study group to examine the laws surrounding Crown grant ownership as it relates to river bottoms. Virginians eagerly await a decision that may bring clarity to this muddled, rancorous issue. Meanwhile, back on the Hazel River, the low-water bridge area is open to anglers, kayakers, and swimmers. But problems remain: One of the original three riparian landowners, citing his Crown grant, is preventing state workers from setting foot on his half of the riverbed to remove a dilapidated dam (at no cost to the landowner) which is delaying its removal. As a result plans for a canoe launch, a public parking lot, and other improvements to the river below the dam have been placed on hold.Check out BRO online editor Jack Murray talking about the issue on Charlottesville’s Newsplex. Beau Beasley (www.beaubeasley.com) is the author of Fly Fishing Virginia and an award-winning conservation writer who specializes in river access and use issues. He wishes to thank the riparian landowners, the Culpeper County Sheriff’s Office, and the citizens of Culpeper County for their assistance in researching this issue.last_img read more


Ecstasy Seizures in Chile Are on the Rise

December 20, 2020

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first_imgBy Guillermo Saavedra/Diálogo September 10, 2020 Ecstasy seizures in Chile have increased drastically, rising from about 400,000 doses to more than 1.2 million between 2018 and 2019, according to the Office of the Attorney General’s Narcotrafficking Observatory of Chile 2020 Report, published on July 29. The report also notes the proliferation nationwide of labs for synthetic drugs, especially ecstasy, a phenomenon it describes as “a different phase in narcotrafficking than what was carried out Chile.”In 2019, Chile’s National police and the Investigations Police found at least 15 clandestine labs, six of which were likely used to process synthetic drugs, the report says. The document specifies that “these labs do not produce nor synthesize drugs, only dosing.”“What did happen is that criminals have set up a process to manufacture pills, using pure ecstasy that comes from abroad,” Commissioner Patricio Navarro, head of the Ministry of the Interior’s Department of Controlled Chemical Substances, told the Chilean newspaper La Tercera.According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime’s World Drug Report 2020, ecstasy continues to be mainly produced in Europe.The report says that two-thirds of the ecstasy labs that authorities dismantled worldwide between 2014-2018 were located in Europe. Several indicators, such as the number of dismantled labs, the number of seizures carried out, and the quantity of ecstasy seized suggest that the global supply has likely increased between 2010 and 2018, the report says.The Chilean Office of the Attorney General’s Anti-drug Unit has identified three main ecstasy-smuggling routes into Chile, La Tercera reported: by mail from Europe — more specifically from the Netherlands and Spain — by mail from Colombia and other neighboring countries, and by land from Argentina.“This country [Argentina] has reported the existence of a route from the Netherlands, with stopovers in Brazil and Uruguay,” Luis Toledo, director of the Anti-drug Unit, told La Tercera. “The contact between Chilean traffickers and their Argentine counterparts allows the former to travel and obtain the substance in the neighboring country and then bring the drug into Chile, hidden in bags and in vehicles’ void spaces.”In September 2019, during a combined operation between Chilean and Argentine security forces, authorities disrupted a gang that was sending drugs from Buenos Aires to Santiago. According to InSight Crime, an organization that specializes in security threats in Latin America and the Caribbean, authorities captured 10 people, after detecting a mail package containing 1.6 kilograms of powdered ecstasy. The criminal gang used the powder to make pills.“No other drug in the history of the country has increased so drastically in such a short period, both in seizures and […] consumption,” Toledo told La Tercera.last_img read more


HMDA, prepaid products top CFPB spring final rulemaking agenda

December 18, 2020

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first_imgCFPB’s rulemaking agenda for the spring of 2015 focuses on finalizing the bureau’s proposed rule updating the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act and, among other things, finalizing a proposal establishing consumer protections for prepaid financial products.CFPB estimates the final rule on HMDA will be ready in August and that the prepaid products final rule will be ready in January 2016. Under the HMDA proposed rule, depository and non-depository institutions meeting all other criteria under Regulation C, and which had originated 25 or more covered loans in the previous calendar year, would be required to report HMDA data, including 39 data fields.NAFCU has raised concerns about the prepaid product proposal’s changes to the definition of a “finance charge,” as well as its potential to limit consumer access to credit and stifle innovation in terms of products and services.CFPB said it is continuing to analyze overdraft services and to research whether rulemaking is warranted. Earlier this month, Credit Union Times reported that CFPB ordered core processor Fiserv to turn over data related to its overdraft programs. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


Eye on Payments 2019: Part III – The three trends fueling the future

December 17, 2020

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first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Mobile wallets, contactless cards and choice – they represent three distinct, but interconnected trends when it comes to consumer payment preferences, and will no doubt serve as the fundamentals for credit union success in the immediate future.Welcome to part III of our blog series on Eye on Payments 2019. This annual payment study by PSCU examines the factors that influence consumers when it comes to their choice and usage of different payment methods.In our first blog from our 2019 study, we revealed that convenience and ease of use are now the main drivers behind a consumer’s choice in payment method, and in our second, we shared insights behind the newest payment preference for debit over credit. Today, we’re going to highlight three of the newest trends within the payments landscape, and share a few of the ways credit unions can keep pace with consumer demand.last_img read more


The crisis hiding in plain sight

December 17, 2020

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first_img 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Andy Janning Andy Janning is a popular keynote speaker at events across the country, a national award-winning expert in talent development, the host of NCUF’s Herb Wegner Memorial Awards, and a … Web: https://www.andyjanningphoto.com Details My wife was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer on August 13, 2019. Many of you know that. I haven’t been shy about it. I’ve talked about it in previous articles and documented her #KarlaStrong journey on Facebook and Instagram.I join countless others who use social media and other online platforms to learn about, rage against, find support for, and cope with the physical, emotional, and psychological toll of cancer.But the actual monetary cost of the disease in the United States – the out-of-pocket expenses for identifying, treating, and defeating the second-leading cause of death on Earth – is still a taboo subject for patients and their families … many of whom are our members, colleagues, and clients.Much like their cancer, a patient’s reasons for silence about their personal financial situation are diverse, personal, and painful. Fear unites them all because of these truths:40% of all Americans will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their livesEvery year, cancer patients will pay over $4 billion in out-of-pocket treatment-related expensesOnly one-third of cancer patients continue working full-time after their diagnosisAdult cancer patients are nearly three times more likely to file for bankruptcy42% of insured cancer patients reported a significant or catastrophic financial burdenBecause cancer annihilated them financially:29% of patients skip appointments with their doctor because they can’t afford the office visit38% postpone or do not fill drug prescriptions31% cut oral medications in half, against medical advice34% skip doses entirelyThis collective devastation has a name: financial toxicity. It is, to borrow a phrase from FamilyReach.org (the source of most of the statistics above), “a national health and economic crisis hiding in plain sight.”If you want to stop reading, I don’t blame you. The coronavirus-shaped gash in the American psyche and economy, coupled with massive social upheaval, has flooded all of us with fear, anger, and doubt. The last thing we need is another world-shattering crisis.The good news is that, right now, some credit unions are fighting financial toxicity, one member at a time. Their efforts embody every good thing about our industry, and help members find hope when all seemed lost.Who are they? What are they doing? And how can more credit unions join the fight?You’ll see.last_img read more